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Study of capital requirements for solar energy. Final report, Volume 2. Appendix B: The Hudson-Jorgenson energy/economic model (Long-term interindustry transactions model): a description

Description: The Hudson-Jorgenson Energy/Economic Model - formally known as the Long Term Interindustry Transactions Model (LITM) - is an econometric model of the structure of the US economy. LITM integrates two separate models into one integrated system. These models are the Macroeconomic Model, a growth model incorporating the underlying trends of economic development, and the Interindustry Model, an endogenous coefficient input-output model of the structure of the economy incorporating patterns of expenditure, prices, and production on a sectoral basis. LITM emphasizes the energy system and its role within the economy. Applications of LITM have, therefore, focused on energy, the effect of energy changes on the economy, and the effect of econometric changes on the energy system. In addition, LITM can be used as framework for long term economic projection and structural analysis.
Date: July 19, 1979
Creator: Hudson, E.A. & Jorgenson, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparative assessment of energy-economy interactions

Description: This analysis is concerned with the impact of energy-policy measures on the level, growth, and structure of the US economy. In particular, the nature and magnitude of the causal relationship between variations in the prices of various energy forms and economic performance, as measured by real gross national product (GNP), is studied. The combined Brookhaven National Laboratory/Dale W. Jorgenson Associates (BNL/DHA) energy-economy model system is used to determine the economic effects of three energy-price futures combined with an invariant set of energy policies. The price alternatives are intended to characterize the uncertainty that exists in the policy-planning environment. In addition, the results are compared to those obtained from another DOE-sponsored analysis which used the Data Resources, Incorporated (DRI) quarterly macroeconomic model to assess the effects of these same three cases. Significant numerical differences in the results from these modeling systems are observed and are attributed to structural differences between the two methodologies. The methodological issues emerging from this comparison have important policy implications which are independent of the specific numerical conclusions. Since it is uncertain which, if either, of the models is correct, the use of one for policy analysis entails the risk that policy will be predicated on inaccurate information. This risk is analyzed within an explicit framework and clear decision rules for information selection and the choice between the modeling systems are formulated.
Date: December 1, 1978
Creator: Goettle, R.J. IV; Hudson, E.A. & Lukachinski, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

X-ray absorption studies of uranium sorption on mineral substrates

Description: Uranium L{sub 3}-edge x-ray absorption spectra have been measured for uranium-mineral sorption systems. An expansible layer silicate, vermiculite, was treated to obtain a collapsed and non-expanding phase, thereby limiting access to the interior cation exchange sites. Samples were prepared by exposing the finely powdered mineral, in the natural and modified form, to aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride. EXAFS spectra of the encapsulated samples were measured at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results indicate that the uranyl ion possesses a more symmetric local structure within the interlayer regions of vermiculite than on the external surfaces.
Date: November 1994
Creator: Hudson, E. A.; Terminello, L. J. & Viani, B. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategic cost-benefit analysis of energy policies: overview

Description: This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. In the first, no additional programs or policies are initiated beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is directed toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third promotes increased domestic supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. The results indicate that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, involves substantial environmental costs and slows the rate of economic growth. These relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation are less than anticipated, or if the costs of synthetic fuels can be significantly lowered. Given these uncertainties, both conservation and RD and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy. However, between these policy alternatives, conservation appears to be the preferred strategy. The results of this study are presented in three reports (see also BNL--51127 and BNL--51128).
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Davitian, H; Groncki, P J; Kleeman, P; Lukachinski, J; Goettle, IV, R J & Hudson, E A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of capital requirements for solar energy. Final report, Volume 1. Analysis of the macroeconomic effects of increased solar energy market penetration

Description: This report defines the analytical framework for, and presents the results of, a study to determine the macroeconomic effects of increased market penetration of solar energy technologies over the 1977-2000 time period. For the purposes of this document, solar technologies are defined as wind, photovoltaics, ocean thermal electric (OTEC), small-scale (non-utility) hydroelectric and all solar active and passive thermal technologies. This research has been undertaken in support of the National Plan to Accelerate Commercialization (NPAC) of Solar Energy. The capital and operating requirements for three market penetration levels are first determined; the effects of these requirements on economic performance are then estimated using the Hudson-Jorgenson Energy/Economic Model. The analytical design, computational methods, data sources, assumptions and scenario configurations for this analysis are defined in detail. The results of the analysis of the economic impact of solar energy are presented in detail, and the implications of these results are discussed. Appendix A explains the methodology for transforming investment to capital stocks. Appendix B, which is provided in a separate volume, describes the Hudson-Jorgenson Model in greater detail. (WHK)
Date: July 19, 1979
Creator: Pleatsikas, C.J.; Hudson, E.A.; O'Connor, D.C. & Funkhouser, D.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic assessment of alternative energy policies

Description: Current US energy policy includes many programs directed toward the restructuring of the energy system so as to decrease US dependence on foreign supplies and to increase our reliance on plentiful and environmentally benign energy forms. However, recent events have led to renewed concern over the direction of current energy policy. This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. The first strategy is to initiate no additional programs or policies beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is to direct policy toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third is to promote increased supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. The analysis indicates that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, and involves substantial environmental costs and impacts on economic performance. However, these relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation turned out to be less than anticipated; therefore, both conservation and R, D, and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy.
Date: April 1, 1980
Creator: Groncki, P J; Goettle, IV, R J & Hudson, E A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategic cost-benefit analysis of energy policies: comparative analysis

Description: Current US energy policy includes many programs directed toward restructuring the energy system in order to decrease US dependence on foreign supplies and to increase our reliance on plentiful and environmentally benign energy flow. This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. In the first strategy no additional programs or policies are initiated beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is directed toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third promotes increased domestic supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. The results indicate that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, involves substantial environmental costs, and slows the rate of economic growth. These relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation are less than anticipated, or if the costs of synthetic fuels can be significantly lowered. Given these uncertainties, both conservation and RD and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy. However, between these policy alternatives, conservation appears to be the preferred strategy. The results of this study are presented in three reports: The Overview; The Detailed Projections; and The Comparative Analysis.
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Davitian, H.; Groncki, P.J.; Kleeman, P.; Lukachinski, J.; Goettle, R.J. IV & Hudson, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resonant soft x-ray fluorescence studies of novel materials

Description: The authors are using resonant soft x-ray fluorescence at the Advanced Light Source to probe the electronic and geometric structure of novel materials. In the resonant process, a core electron is excited by a photon whose energy is near the core binding energy. In this energy regime the absorption and emission processes are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways. In boron nitride (BN), the resonant emission spectra reflect the influence of a ``spectator`` electron in an unoccupied excitonic state. The resonant emission can be used to distinguish between the various bulk phases of BN, and can also be used to probe the electronic structure of a monolayer of BN buried in a bulk environment, where it is inaccessible to electron spectroscopies. For highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) a coherent absorption-emission process takes place in the resonant regime, whereby crystalline momentum is conserved between the core excited electron and the valence hole which remains after emission.
Date: February 8, 1995
Creator: Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Jia, J.J.; Callcott, T.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department