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Fuel Used for Off-Highway Recreation

Description: The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile. Two factors governed the development of this estimation procedure. First, individual state shares of the total Trust Funds need to be developed using a uniform approach. Second, data needed for the estimation procedure should be publicly available and easily obtainable so that estimates for all subsequent years can be generated easily. Estimates were developed based on existing data sources. Adjustment factors were developed to take into account different vehicular off-highway recreational usage among states.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Hu, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light-duty vehicle summary

Description: This summary covers more than fifteen years of light-duty vehicle data (i.e., automobiles and light trucks combined) from model year 1976 through the first six months of model year 1991, on a nameplate level (e.g., Chevrolet Corsica is a nameplate). Included in this summary are estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, sales, and market shares of new automobiles and new light trucks sold in each model year. Comparisons and observations are made on the trends from one model year to the next.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Hu, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1995 NPTS Databook

Description: Policymakers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-alleviating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the Department of Transportation (DOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, and 1995. The 1995 survey was cosponsored by four DOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), Federal Transit Administration (FTA), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey.
Date: December 5, 2001
Creator: Hu, P. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proof of Concept of ITS as An Alternative Data Resource: A Demonstration Project of Florida and New York Data

Description: The use of ITS-generated data as a data resource is a multifaceted challenge. The most effective way of confronting this challenge is to focus early efforts on localized areas with well-defined parameters. With the idea of starting with a well-defined problem, this research demonstrates the feasibility of using ITS-generated data to meet traffic information needs. Specifically, this study focused on two crucial traffic parameters: (1) total traffic volume, and (2) total VMT--basically, the information collected from the Traffic Monitoring Program. Traffic data collected from Florida and New York ITS deployments were used to test the communications and estimation procedures.
Date: December 5, 2001
Creator: Hu, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Variability in continuous traffic monitoring data

Description: Each state in the United States can be viewed as a universe of road segments. For each road segment in each state, it is desired to know various traffic characteristics based on count data, classification count data, and weigh-in-motion data. These data are absolutely essential for highway design, maintenance, safety, and planning. Given no cost constraints, each road segment would be continuously monitored every day of the year. However, in practice, a few road segments are monitored continuously every day of the year to produce annual characteristics of traffic flow. The remaining road segments are monitored for one or two days each year, and this resulting data are `adjusted` (using factors based on data collected from the continuously monitored road segments) to produce estimates of annual characteristics. With this general approach, each state strives to provide estimates of annual characteristics for each road segment within its jurisdiction. In 1985, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published the Traffic Monitoring Guide to assist states in achieving this end. As with almost any data collection effort, the monitoring data suffers from errors from many sources. In this paper, we report some empirical findings in a research project sponsored by the FHWA. This research project studied the variability in the traffic data from the continuously monitored road segments from state(s) and, the extent to which this variability is transferred to and affects the precision of the data produced from the road segments which are monitored only one or two days each year. The ultimate hope is that states will eventually be able to not only publish an estimate of a characteristic such as Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) for each road segment, but also that each estimate will be accompanied by a statement expressing how good the estimate is in terms of its estimated ...
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Wright, T.; Hu, P.S. & Young, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Projecting Fatalities in Crashes Involving Older Drivers, 2000-2025

Description: As part of this research effort, we developed a new methodology for projecting elderly traffic crash fatalities. This methodology separates exposure to crashes from crash risk per se, and further divides exposure into two components, the number of miles driven and the likelihood of being a driver. This component structure permits conceptually different determinants of traffic fatalities to be projected separately and has thorough motivation in behavioral theory. It also permits finer targeting of particular aspects of projections that need improvement and closer linking of projections to possible policy instruments for influencing them.
Date: March 23, 2001
Creator: Hu, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary assessment of fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act

Description: To facilitate the goal of decreasing oil imports by 10 percent by the year 2000 and 30 percent by 2010, two sections of the Energy Policy Act encourage and mandate alternative fuel vehicles in the acquisition of fleet vehicles. The first step in estimating the contribution of these mandates toward meeting the aforementioned goal entails identifying affected fleets. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of potential vehicle fleet coverage. Only a limited number of companies in the methanol, ethanol, and hydrogen industries are likely to quality for this mandate. Whereas, many of the oil producers, petroleum refiners, and electricity companies are likely to be regulated.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Hu, P.S.; Davis, S.C. & Wang, M.Q.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Revision of the MCSAP Allocation Formula: Summary Report

Description: In 1982, Congress authorized the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP), a Federal grant-in-aid program to improve commercial motor carrier safety. MCSAP was reauthorized in 1986, 1991, and 1998. In June 1997, in anticipation of and preparation for reauthorization, a MCSAP Formula Workgroup convened to analyze requirements for a new allocation formula and to develop the formula. Because of provisions in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21), a major change in approach was to consider including performance (i.e., safety improvements) in the formula. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) actively participated in the Workgroup activities, provided technical assistance in evaluating factors and conducting scenario analyses, prepared regulatory language for the Federal Register Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), analyzed NPRM comments and recommended responses to the comments, assisted with preparation of the Federal Register Final Rule, developed the final spreadsheet, and prepared an informational brochure on MCSAP for use by the States. The allocation of MCSAP funds for FY2001 will use the new formula.
Date: September 1, 2000
Creator: Truett, L.F.; Davis, S.C. & Hu, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model

Description: The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA required that certain tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-road recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Funds to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual States equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1993 to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-road recreation in the State level by different vehicle types. A modification of the methodology developed by ORNL has been used to apportion funds to the States since that time.
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F. & Hu, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Variability in traffic monitoring data. Final summary report

Description: For highway maintenance and planning purposes, it is desirable to characterize each road segment by its traffic flow [such as the annual average daily traffic (AADT) and the AADT for each vehicle class], by the weight distribution of vehicles that travel on its roads [such as the annual average daily equivalent single axle loadings (ESAL) and the annual average daily weight per vehicle for each vehicle class]. As with almost any data collection effort, the monitoring data suffer from errors from many sources. This report summarizes results of a two year empirical research effort, which was sponsored by the Federal highway Administration, (i) to study and characterize the variability in the traffic data (volume, classification, and weight) from the continuously monitored road segments, and (ii) to study the extent to which this variability is transferred to, and affects the precision of the data produced form the road segments which are monitored only one or two days each year. The ultimate hope is not only that states will eventually be able to publish an estimate of a characteristic such as AADT for each road segment, but also that each estimate will be accompanied by a statement of how good the estimate is in terms of the estimated variability or precision which will likely be experienced as a coefficient of variation (i.e., the quotient of a standard deviation and a mean). This report provides highlights of research reported in five working papers.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Wright, T.; Hu, P.S.; Young, J. & Lu, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Registrations and vehicle miles of travel of light duty vehicles, 1985--1995

Description: To obtain vehicle registration data that consistently and accurately reflect the distinction between automobiles and light-duty trucks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was asked by FHWA to estimate the current and historical vehicle registration numbers of automobiles and of other two-axle four-tire vehicles (i.e., light-duty trucks), and their associated travel. The term automobile is synonymous with passenger car. Passenger cars are defined as all sedans, coupes, and station wagons manufactured primarily for the purpose of carrying passengers. This includes taxicabs, rental cars, and ambulances and hearses on an automobile chassis. Light-duty trucks refer to all two-axle four-tire vehicles other than passenger cars. They include pickup trucks, panel trucks, delivery and passenger vans, and other vehicles such as campers, motor homes, ambulances on a truck chassis, hearses on a truck chassis, and carryalls. In this study, light-duty trucks include four major types: (1) pickup truck, (2) van, (3) sport utility vehicle, and (4) other 2-axle 4-tire truck. Specifically, this project re-estimates statistics that appeared in Tables MV-1 and MV-9 of the 1995 Highway Statistics. Given the complexity of the approach developed in this effort and the incompleteness and inconsistency of the state-submitted data, it is recommended that alternatives be considered by FHWA to obtain vehicle registration data. One alternative is the Polk`s NVPP data (via the US Department of Transportation`s annual subscription to Polk). The second alternative is to obtain raw registration files from individual states` Departments of Motor Vehicles and to decode individual VINs.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Hu, P.S.; Davis, S.C. & Schmoyer, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fleet vehicles in the Unites States: composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices

Description: As fleets become a larger proportion of the new vehicle population on the road, they have more influence on the characteristics of the total US motor vehicle population. One of the characteristics which fleets are expected to have the most influence on is the overall vehicle fuel economy. In addition, because of the relatively large market share and the high turnover rate of fleet vehicles, fleets have been considered as a useful initial market for alternative fuel vehicles. In order to analyze fleet market potential and likely market penetration of alternative fuel vehicles and to infrastructure requirements for successful operations of these vehicles in the future, information on fleet sizes and composition, fleet vehicle operating characteristics (such as daily/annual miles of travel), fuel efficiency, and refueling practices, is essential. The purpose of this report is to gather and summarize information from the latest data sources available pertaining to fleet vehicles in the US This report presents fleet vehicle data on composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices. The questions these data are intended to address include: (1) How are fleet vehicles operated (2) Where are they located and (3) What are their usual fueling practices Since a limited number of alternative fuel fleet vehicles are already in use, data on these vehicles are also included in this report. 17 refs.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Miaou, S.P.; Hu, P.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) & Young, J.R. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department