33 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Energy from hot dry rock

Description: The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Hendron, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy extraction operations: some preliminary results

Description: An experimental project being conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has extracted thermal energy from Precambrian granitic rock by injection and circulating water through fractured zones or reservoirs. Two boreholes were drilled to depths of about 3 km (10,000 ft) in a location selected for high heat flow and an apparent lack of faulting. Bottom-hole temperature was 205/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F). The holes were connected at depth by hydraulic fracturing to form a flow path and heat extraction surface. Energy has been extracted at rates exceeding 5 MW(t) in three operations totaling 2847 h. These operations are summarized.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Hendron, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hot dry rock energy project

Description: A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Hendron, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA

Description: The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Hendron, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hot dry rock energy extraction operations

Description: Progress in the establishment of a two-hole and connecting-fracture system on the southwest flank of the Valles Caldera in north-central New Mexico is summarized. Piping and equipment to complete the energy extraction system, the initial operation, and some brief and early interpretations of results are reported. To date the loop has run 52 days with several minor interruptions of short duration and 3 longer ones of up to 14 h. (JGB)
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Hendron, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America Performance Analysis Procedures for Existing Homes

Description: Because there are more than 101 million residential households in the United States today, it is not surprising that existing residential buildings represent an extremely large source of potential energy savings. Because thousands of these homes are renovated each year, Building America is investigating the best ways to make existing homes more energy-efficient, based on lessons learned from research in new homes. The Building America program is aiming for a 20%-30% reduction in energy use in existing homes by 2020. The strategy for the existing homes project of Building America is to establish technology pathways that reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in American homes. The existing buildings project focuses on finding ways to adapt the results from the new homes research to retrofit applications in existing homes. Research activities include a combination of computer modeling, field demonstrations, and long-term monitoring to support the development of integrated approaches to reduce energy use in existing residential buildings. Analytical tools are being developed to guide designers and builders in selecting the best approaches for each application. Also, DOE partners with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to increase energy efficiency in existing homes through the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program.
Date: May 1, 2006
Creator: Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Whole-House Energy Analysis Procedures for Existing Homes: Preprint

Description: This paper describes a proposed set of guidelines for analyzing the energy savings achieved by a package of retrofits or an extensive rehabilitation of an existing home. It also describes certain field test and audit methods that can help establish accurate building system performance characteristics that are needed for a meaningful simulation of whole-house energy use. Several sets of default efficiency values have been developed for older appliances that cannot be easily tested and for which published specifications are not readily available. These proposed analysis procedures are documented more comprehensively in NREL Technical Report TP-550-38238.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America Research Benchmark Definition, Updated December 15, 2006

Description: To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines (RESNET 2002), with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. Unlike the reference homes used for HERS, EnergyStar, and most energy codes, the Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without the complication of chasing a ''moving target''.
Date: January 1, 2007
Creator: Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated December 19, 2008

Description: To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams.
Date: December 1, 2008
Creator: Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated December 20, 2007

Description: To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines (RESNET 2002), with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. Unlike the reference homes used for HERS, EnergyStar, and most energy codes, the Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without the complication of chasing a 'moving target'.
Date: January 1, 2008
Creator: Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America Research Benchmark Definition: Updated August 15, 2007

Description: To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Building America industry teams. The Benchmark is generally consistent with mid-1990s standard practice, as reflected in the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Technical Guidelines (RESNET 2002), with additional definitions that allow the analyst to evaluate all residential end-uses, an extension of the traditional HERS rating approach that focuses on space conditioning and hot water. Unlike the reference homes used for HERS, EnergyStar, and most energy codes, the Benchmark represents typical construction at a fixed point in time so it can be used as the basis for Building America's multi-year energy savings goals without the complication of chasing a 'moving target'.
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint

Description: In order to meet whole-house energy savings targets beyond 50% in residential buildings, it will be essential that new technologies and systems approaches be developed to address miscellaneous electric loads (MELs). These MELs are comprised of the small and diverse collection of energy-consuming devices found in homes, including what are commonly known as plug loads (televisions, stereos, microwaves), along with all hard-wired loads that do not fit into other major end-use categories (doorbells, security systems, garage door openers). MELs present special challenges because their purchase and operation are largely under the control of the occupants. If no steps are taken to address MELs, they can constitute 40-50% of the remaining source energy use in homes that achieve 60-70% whole-house energy savings, and this percentage is likely to increase in the future as home electronics become even more sophisticated and their use becomes more widespread. Building America (BA), a U.S. Department of Energy research program that targets 50% energy savings by 2015 and 90% savings by 2025, has begun to identify and develop advanced solutions that can reduce MELs.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Hendron, R. & Eastment, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Standardized Domestic Hot Water Event Schedules for Residential Buildings

Description: The Building America Research Benchmark is a standard house definition created as a point of reference for tracking progress toward multi-year energy savings targets. As part of its development, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established a set of domestic hot water events to be used in conjunction with sub-hourly analysis of advanced hot water systems.
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Hendron, R. & Burch, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Method for Evaluating Energy Use of Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, and Clothes Dryers: Preprint

Description: Building America teams are researching opportunities to improve energy efficiency for some of the more challenging end-uses, such as lighting (both fixed and occupant-provided), appliances (clothes washer, dishwasher, clothes dryer, refrigerator, and range), and miscellaneous electric loads, which are all heavily dependent on occupant behavior and product choices. These end-uses have grown to be a much more significant fraction of total household energy use (as much as 50% for very efficient homes) as energy efficient homes have become more commonplace through programs such as ENERGY STAR and Building America. As modern appliances become more sophisticated the residential energy analyst is faced with a daunting task in trying to calculate the energy savings of high efficiency appliances. Unfortunately, most whole-building simulation tools do not allow the input of detailed appliance specifications. Using DOE test procedures the method outlined in this paper presents a reasonable way to generate inputs for whole-building energy-simulation tools. The information necessary to generate these inputs is available on Energy-Guide labels, the ENERGY-STAR website, California Energy Commission's Appliance website and manufacturer's literature. Building America has developed a standard method for analyzing the effect of high efficiency appliances on whole-building energy consumption when compared to the Building America's Research Benchmark building.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Eastment, M. & Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America Developments, September 2000, Information Bulletin Number 1 (Revised)

Description: Building America Developments on-line newsletter highlights the Erie-Ellington Homes publicly-funded housing project in Boston, Massachusetts. A Building America and industry partnership that produced energy-efficient manufactured homes built with foam core panels is featured. Also, Habitat for Humanity dedicates two energy-efficient test houses in East Tennessee, and affordable, healthy homes are offered in metro Atlanta. Upcoming events in the Building America Program are also listed.
Date: December 1, 2001
Creator: Hendron, R.; Anderson, J. & Epstein, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building America House Simulation Protocols (Revised)

Description: The House Simulation Protocol document was developed to track and manage progress toward Building America's multi-year, average whole-building energy reduction research goals for new construction and existing homes, using a consistent analytical reference point. This report summarizes the guidelines for developing and reporting these analytical results in a consistent and meaningful manner for all home energy uses using standard operating conditions.
Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Hendron, R. & Engebrecht, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Power from the hot-dry-rock geothermal resource

Description: The history of the development of the first HDR reservoir at the Fenton Hill site is presented. Particulars on the surface piping and data collection system are described, as well as a brief historical account of the individual experiments. Field research results at Fenton Hill are described. From the research, it has been learned that the geothermal reservoir growth is due in large part to pressurization and thermophysical effects. The impedance to flow along the fractures within the reservoir decreases as thermal contraction and pressurization of the reservoir continue to open natural joints. Minimal environmental effects have been noted as a result of closed-system circulation; and the chemical quality of the geothermal fluid has been good, in contrast to the corrosive geothermal fluids in many hydrothermal systems. Some of the general as well as site-specific problems at the Fenton Hill site are discussed. In-spite of these problems, an HDR system is operational, and is being used to answer questions raised by the theoretical research. The types and options of power generation available are addressed. A binary-fluid cycle that can use nonaqueous working fluids is an alternative to single- or multiple-flash systems. These nonaqueous fluids may fall within a large range of hydrocarbon, fluorocarbon, and organic fluids. R-114 was tested in binary cycle at Fenton Hill and was chosen largely for its heat-transfer characteristics and previous industrial experience.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Becker, N.M.; Pettitt, R.A. & Hendron, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tool to Prioritize Energy Efficiency Investments

Description: To provide analytic support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of the Building Technology Program (BTP), NREL developed a Microsoft Excel-based tool to provide an open and objective comparison of the hundreds of investment opportunities available to BTP. This tool uses established methodologies to evaluate the energy savings and cost of those savings.
Date: August 1, 2012
Creator: Farese, P.; Gelman, R. & Hendron, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

Description: The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.
Date: September 1, 2013
Creator: Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D. & Pless, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: Annual operating plan, fiscal year 1989

Description: With completion of the repairs of EE-2 wellbore in FY88, the major effort in FY89 will be directed toward the remaining preparations for the Long-Term Flow Test (LTFT) now scheduled to begin in September 1990. Procurement of components and equipment and installation of the surface system will continue through this and the next fiscal year to be ready for the LTFT in September 1990. Reservoir experiments will consist of pressurization and flow tests to establish further characteristics of the Phase II reservoir, particularly operating water losses. Laboratory studies will continue work on fracture healing and complete adsorption tests for chemically-reactive tracer work. Cleaning and relining of the EE-I pond to meet New Mexico State requirements, started in FY88, will be completed. Reanalysis of seismic data and automation of seismic data techniques will continue. Monitoring for environmental information, routine operations, security, health and safety training, and reporting activities will continue. The program's objectives are: (1) To develop HDR drilling, hardware and instrumentation technology for energy extraction and conduct a successful energy extraction field experiment of the Phase II reservoir. (2) To verify that the environmental consequences of HDR development are acceptable. (3) To improve HDR technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known hot dry rock resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh. (4) To evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir by 1992. That performance consists of system operating characteristics, including thermal drawdown, energy output, reservoir impedance, and water consumption.
Date: September 1, 1988
Creator: Franke, P.R.; Hendron, R.H. & Murphy, H.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of a High-Performance Solar Home in Loveland, Colorado: Preprint

Description: Building America (BA) partner McStain Neighborhoods built the Discovery House in Loveland, Colorado, with an extensive package of energy-efficient features, including a high-performance envelope, efficient mechanical systems, a solar water heater integrated with the space-heating system, a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV), and ENERGY STAR appliances. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Building Science Consortium (BSC) conducted short-term field-testing and building energy simulations to evaluate the performance of the house. These evaluations are utilized by BA to improve future prototype designs and to identify critical research needs. The Discovery House building envelope and ducts were very tight under normal operating conditions. The HRV provided fresh air at a rate of about 35 l/s (75 cfm), consistent with the recommendations of ASHRAE Standard 62.2. The solar hot water system is expected to meet the bulk of the domestic hot water (DHW) load (>83%), but only about 12% of the space-heating load. DOE-2.2 simulations predict whole-house source energy savings of 54% compared to the BA Benchmark. The largest contributors to energy savings beyond McStain's standard practice are the solar water heater, HRV, improved air distribution, high-efficiency boiler, and compact fluorescent lighting package.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G. & Reeves, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma

Description: The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G. & Reeves, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department