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IMS applications analysis

Description: This report examines the market potential of a miniature, hand-held Ion Mobility Spectrometer. Military and civilian markets are discussed, as well as applications in a variety of diverse fields. The strengths and weaknesses of competing technologies are discussed. An extensive Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) bibliography is included. The conclusions drawn from this study are: (1) There are a number of competing technologies that are capable of detecting explosives, drugs, biological, or chemical agents. The IMS system currently represents the best available compromise regarding sensitivity, specificity, and portability. (2) The military market is not as large as the commercial market, but the military services are more likely to invest R and D funds in the system. (3) Military applications should be addressed before commercial applications are addressed. (4) There is potentially a large commercial market for rugged, hand-held Ion Mobility Spectrometer systems. Commercial users typically do not invest R and D funds in this type of equipment rather, they wait for off-the-shelf availability.
Date: March 1, 2000
Creator: RODACY,PHILIP J.; REBER,STEPHEN D.; SIMONSON,ROBERT J. & HANCE,BRADLEY G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

Description: This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.
Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E. & SCHMIDT,C.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery.

Description: Networked systems of low-cost, small, integrable chemical sensors will enable monitoring of Nonproliferation and Materials Control targets and chemical weapons threats. Sandia-designed prototype chemical sensor systems are undergoing extended field testing supported by DOE and other government agencies. A required surety component will be verification of microanalytical system performance, which can be achieved by providing a programmable source of chemical signature(s) for autonomous calibration of analytical systems. In addition, such a controlled chemical source could be used to dispense microaliquots of derivatization reagents, extending the analysis capability of chemical sensors to a wider range of targets. We have developed a microfabricated system for controlled release of selected compounds (calibrants) into the analytical stream of microsensor systems. To minimize pumping and valve requirements of microfluidic systems, and to avoid degradation issues associated with storage of dilute solutions, we have utilized thermally labile organic salts as solid-phase reservoir materials. Reproducible deposition of tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide onto arrays of microfabricated heating elements can provide a pair of calibration marker compounds (one fast and one slow-eluting compound) for GC analyses. The use of this microaliquot gas source array for hydrogen generation is currently under further development. The goal of the latter effort will be to provide a source of high-pressure, low viscosity GC carrier gas for Sandia's next-generation microfabricated gas-phase chemical analysis systems.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Staton, Alan W.; Simonson, Robert Joseph; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Rawlinson, Kim Scott; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Hance, Bradley G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distributed Sensor Particles for Remote Fluorescence Detection of Trace Analytes: UXO/CW

Description: This report summarizes the development of sensor particles for remote detection of trace chemical analytes over broad areas, e.g residual trinitrotoluene from buried landmines or other unexploded ordnance (UXO). We also describe the potential of the sensor particle approach for the detection of chemical warfare (CW) agents. The primary goal of this work has been the development of sensor particles that incorporate sample preconcentration, analyte molecular recognition, chemical signal amplification, and fluorescence signal transduction within a ''grain of sand''. Two approaches for particle-based chemical-to-fluorescence signal transduction are described: (1) enzyme-amplified immunoassays using biocompatible inorganic encapsulants, and (2) oxidative quenching of a unique fluorescent polymer by TNT.
Date: November 1, 2001
Creator: SINGH, ANUP K.; GUPTA, ALOK; MULCHANDANI, ASHOK; CHEN, WILFRED; BHATIA, RIMPLE B.; SCHOENIGER, JOSEPH S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department