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Influence of orientation on fracture toughness and tensile moduli in Berkeley granite

Description: Fracture toughness and tensile modulus values for Berkeley granite show pronounced orientation dependence. Apparent fracture toughness values (K{sub Q}) correspond to natural strong and weak planes in the rock: cracks propagated in the head grain (strongest) plane have K{sub Q} = 1.81 MPa ..sqrt..m, those grown in the rift (weakest) plane have K{sub Q} = 1.01 MPa ..sqrt..m and those in the grain (intermediate) plane have K/sub Q/ = 1.40 MPa ..sqrt..m. These directional K/sub Q/ data also correlate with tensile modulus values, E, which are 50.7 GPa,, 21.6 GPa and 39.3 GPa, respectively. An empirical relationship between K/sub Q/ and E is demonstrated. Monitoring of acoustic emission events shows promise as a detector of onset of crack growth.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Halleck, P.M. & Kumnick, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical effects in rock under negative effective pressures: sound speeds and hydraulic diffusivity

Description: A method for creating negative effective pressure in the laboratory has been developed and longitudinal sound speed and gas diffusivity under these conditions have been measured. The pressure field is created inside an annulus of fluid injection holes in a cylindrical sample; fluid flows radially outward down the pore pressure gradient to the sample's exterior. Pore pressure is monitored through capillary probes and the pressure field is uniform inside the injection ring. With pore fluid pressures to 1.2 MPa, decreases in both acoustic velocity and amplitude in an unconfined sample of fine-grained granite are observed. The velocity decrease is about 1.5% per MPa while amplitude decreases by approximately 10% per MPa. By measuring pressure relaxation after stepwise pore pressure increases, increases in gas diffusivity of approximately a factor of three between 0 and -1 MPa effective pressure are determined.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Shankland, T.J. & Halleck, P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary evaluation of the radioactive waste isolation potential of the alluvium-filled valleys of the Great Basin

Description: The occurrences, geologic features, hydrology, and thermal, mechanical, and mineralogical properties of the alluvium-filled valleys are compared with those of other media within the Great Basin. Computer modeling of heat conduction indicates that heat generated by the radioactive waste can be dissipated through the alluvium in a manner that will not threaten the integrity of the repository, although waste emplacement densities will be lower than for other media available. This investigation has not revealed any failure mechanism by which one can rule out alluvium as a primary waste isolation medium. However, the alluvium appears to rank behind one or more other possible media in all properties examined except, perhaps, in sorption properties. It is therefore recommended that alluvium be considered as a secondary isolation medium unless primary sites in other rock types in the Great Basin are eliminated from consideration on grounds other than those considered here.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Smyth, J.R.; Crowe, B.M.; Halleck, P.M. & Reed, A.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

Description: Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.
Date: November 17, 1997
Creator: Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A. & Halleck, P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

Description: The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in the presence ...
Date: April 20, 2002
Creator: Grader, A.S.; Elsworth, D.; Halleck, P.M.; Alvarad, F.; Yasuhara, H. & Alajmi, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural-gas-hydrate deposits: a review of in-situ properties

Description: The Los Alamos hydrate project has concentrated on: evaluating techniques to produce gas from hydrate deposits to determine critical reservoir and production variables; predicting physical properties of hydrate-containing sediments both for their effects on production models and to allow us to develop geophysical exploration and reservoir characterization techniques; and measuring properties of synthetic hydrate cores in the laboratory. Exploration techniques can help assess the size of potential hydrate deposits and determine which production techniques are appropriate for particular deposits. So little is known about the physical properties of hydrate deposits that it is difficult to develop geophysical techniques to locate or characterize them; but, because of the strong similarity between hydrates and ice, empirical relationships between ice composition and seismic velocity, electrical resistivity, density, and heat capacity that have been established for frozen rocks may be used to estimate the physical properties of hydrate deposits. Resistivities of laboratory permafrost samples are shown to follow a variation of Archie's equation. Both the resistivities and seismic velocities are functions of the unfrozen water content (Sw); however, resistivities are more sensitive to changes in Sw, varying by as much as three orders of magnitude, which may allow the use of electrical resistivity measurements to estimte the amount of hydrate in place. We estimated Sw, assuming that the dissolved salt in the pore water is concentrated as a brine phase as the hydrates form, and the brine content as a function of depth, assuming several temperature gradients and pore water salinities. Hydrate-bearing zones are characterized by high seismic velocities and electrical resistivities compared to unfrozen sediments or permafrost zones.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Halleck, P.M.; Pearson, C.; McGuire, P.L.; Hermes, R. & Mathews, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

Description: The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can ...
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Jr, J.H. Frantz; Brown, K.G.; Sawyer, W.K.; Zyglowicz, P.A.; Halleck, P.M. & Spivey, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

Description: The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are ...
Date: October 28, 2002
Creator: Grader, A.S.; Elsworth, D.; Halleck, P.M.; Alvarado, F.; Yasuhara, H.; Alajmi, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

Description: The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the fracture, its ...
Date: December 7, 2005
Creator: Grader, A.S.; Elsworth, D.; Halleck, P.M.; Alvarao, F.; Alajmi, A.; Karpyn, Z. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

Description: The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to quantify the ...
Date: June 15, 2005
Creator: Grader, A.S.; Elsworth, D.; Halleck, P.M.; Alvarado, F.; Alajmi, A.; Karpyn, Z. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

Description: The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to quantify the ...
Date: June 15, 2005
Creator: Grader, A.S.; Elsworth, D.; Halleck, P.M.; Alvarado, F.; Alajmi, A.; Karpyn, Z. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department