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Report of scouting study on precipitation of strontium, plutonium, and americium from Hanford complexant concentrate waste

Description: A laboratory scouting test was conducted of precipitation methods for reducing the solubility of radionuclides in complexant concentrate (CC) waste solution. The results show that addition of strontium nitrate solution is effective in reducing the liquid phase activity of 90Sr (Strontium) in CC waste from tank 107-AN by 94% when the total strontium concentration is adjusted to 0.1 M. Addition of ferric nitrate solution effective in reducing the 241Am (Americium) activity in CC waste by 96% under the conditions described in the report. Ferric nitrate was also marginally effective in reducing the solubility of 239/240Pu (Plutonium) in CC waste
Date: September 5, 1995
Creator: Herting, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

Description: Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.
Date: October 18, 2006
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

Description: Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 2224 Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cesium-137 sulfate and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.
Date: April 13, 2007
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) WASTES LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT

Description: Laboratory studies demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable process for separating Hanford medium-curie waste into high-curie and low-curie fractions. The product salt from the crystallization process qualifies as low-curie feed to a supplemental treatment system (e.g., bulk vitrification). The high-curie raffinate is returned to the double-shell tank system, eventually to be sent as feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Process flowsheet tests were designed with the aid of thermodynamic chemical modeling. Laboratory equipment design and test procedures were developed using simulated tank waste samples. Proof-of-concept flowsheet tests were carried out in a shielded hot cell using actual tank waste samples. Data from both simulated waste tests and actual tank waste tests demonstrate that the process exceeded all of the separation criteria established for the program.
Date: December 5, 2006
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test Plan for Tank 241-C-104 Retrieval Testing

Description: Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document.
Date: August 25, 1999
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Saltcake dissolution FY 1998 status report

Description: A laboratory scouting study was completed on the dissolution characteristics of Hanford waste from three single-shell waste tanks: 241-BY-102, 241-BY-106, and 241-B-106. Gross dissolution behavior (percent undissolved solids as a function of dilution) is explained in terms of characteristics of individual salts in the waste. The percentage of the sodium inventory retrievable from the tanks by dissolving saltcake at reasonable dilution levels is estimated at 86% of the total sodium for tank BY-102, 98% for BY-106, and 79% for B-106.
Date: May 18, 1999
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of dilution studies with waste from tank 241-AN-104

Description: This report documents the completion of the B and W Hanford Company functional and Safety Review Board reviews and the Fluor Daniel Hanford review for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), HNF-SD-CP-SAR-021, Revision 1. The reviews for the FSAR were conducted during the period from December 9, 1998 to January 14, 1999.
Date: May 18, 1999
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tank plan for tank 241-C-104 retrieval testing

Description: Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document.
Date: May 21, 1999
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Saltcake Dissolution FY 2000 Status Report

Description: Laboratory tests were completed on the dissolution characteristics of Hanford saltcake waste from single-shell waste tanks 241-TX- 113, 241-BY-102, 241-BY-106, 241-A-101, and 241-S-102 (henceforth referred to as TX-113, BY-102, BY-106, A-101, and S-102, respectively). This work was funded by the Tanks Focus Area (EM-50) under Technical Task Plan Number RL0-8-WT-41, ''PHMC Pretreatment--Saltcake Dissolution''. The tests performed on saltcake from tank TX-113 were similar in scope to those completed in previous years on waste from tanks BY-102, BY-106, B-106, A-101, and S-102 (Herting 1998, 1999). In addition to the ''standard'' dissolution tests, new types of tests were performed this year related to feed stability and radionuclide distribution. The River Protection Project (RPP) is tasked with retrieving waste from double-shell and single-shell tanks to provide feed for vitrification. The RPP organization needs chemical and physical data to evaluate technologies for retrieving the waste. Little significant laboratory testing has been done to evaluate in-tank dissolution parameters for the various types of saltcake wastes that exist in single-shell tanks. A computer modeling program known as the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP), produced by OLI Systems, Inc of Morris Plains, New Jersey, is being used by the RPP organization to predict solubilities during dilution and retrieval of all tank waste types. Data from this task are provided to ESP users to support evaluation, refinement, and validation of the ESP model.
Date: September 27, 2000
Creator: HERTING, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test plan for Simulated Saltcake Retrieval Test

Description: This document describes the plan for a bench-scale laboratory test to evaluate physical and chemical parameters associated with dissolution of a simulated saltcake waste. Parameters to be measured during the test include water addition rate, liquid drainage rate, visual observations of flow patterns, physical appearance and volume of dissolving saltcake, chemical composition of drained liquid, and polarized light microscopy analysis of solids.
Date: July 19, 2000
Creator: Herting, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean salt process final report

Description: A process has been demonstrated in the laboratory for separating clean, virtually non-radioactive sodium nitrate from Hanford tank waste using fractional crystallization. The name of the process is the Clean Salt Process. Flowsheet modeling has shown that the process is capable of reducing the volume of vitrified low activity waste (LAW) by 80 to 90 %. Construction of the Clean Salt processing plant would cost less than $1 10 million, and would eliminate the need for building a $2.2 billion large scale vitrification plant planned for Privatization Phase 11. Disposal costs for the vitrified LAW would also be reduced by an estimated $240 million. This report provides a summary of five years of laboratory and engineering development activities, beginning in fiscal year 1992. Topics covered include laboratory testing of a variety of processing options; proof-of-principle demonstrations with actual waste samples from Hanford tanks 241-U-110 (U-110), 241-SY-101 (101-SY), and 241-AN-102 (102-AN); descriptions of the primary solubility phase diagrams that govem the process; a review of environmental regulations governing disposition of the reclaimed salt and an assessment of the potential beneficial uses of the reclaimed salt; preliminary plant design and construction cost estimates. A detailed description is given for the large scale laboratory demonstration of the process using waste from tank 241-AW-101 (101-AW), a candidate waste for 0044vitrification during Phase I Privatization.
Date: September 30, 1996
Creator: Herting, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test plan for tank 241-AN-104 dilution studies

Description: Tank 241-AN-104 (104-AN) has been identified as the one of the first tanks to be retrieved for low level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount and type of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed and to re-dissolve major soluble sodium salts while not precipitating out other salts. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document. Tank 241-AN-104 is on the Hydrogen Watch List.
Date: January 9, 1998
Creator: Herting, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste Slurry Particle Properties for Use in Slurry Flow Modeling

Description: Hanford's tank farm piping system must be substantially modified to deliver high-level wastes from the underground storage tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant now under construction. Improved knowledge of the physical properties of the solids was required to support the design of the modified system. To provide this additional knowledge, particle size distributions for composite samples from seven high-level waste feed tanks were measured using two different laser lightscattering particle size analyzers. These measurements were made under a variety of instrumental conditions, including various flow rates through the sample loop, various stirring rates in the sample reservoir, and before and after subjecting the particles to ultrasonic energy. A mean value over all the tanks of 4.2 {micro}m was obtained for the volume-based median particle size. Additional particle size information was obtained from sieving tests, settling tests and microscopic observations.
Date: February 26, 2003
Creator: Jewett, J. R.; Conrads, T. J.; Julyk, L. J.; Reynolds, D. A.; Jensen, L.; Kirch, N. W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department