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Selective Anion Exchange Resins for the Removal of Perchlorate [(CIO{sub 4}{sup -})] from Groundwater

Description: The primary objective of this project was to evaluate a novel bifunctional anion exchange resin for the cost-effective, in situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}). Both laboratory and field studies were performed to determine the selectivity and capacity of the bifunctional synthetic resins to sorb ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from simulated or actual contaminated groundwater. A number of synthetic bifunctional resins, including two commercial versions made by Purolite International and three commercially available, mono-functional resins, were tested. Initial laboratory batch and column breakthrough studies determined the best synthetic resins and the optimal conditions for the field experiment. Laboratory results indicated that the bifunctional synthetic resins, D-3696 and RO-02-119 were highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed {approx}5 times better than the best commercial nitrate resin (Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than some nonselective commercial resins (e.g. Amberlite{reg_sign} IRA-900). The bifunctional resins were particularly effective in removing trace quantities of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater to below the detection limit ({approx} 3 {micro}g/L). A field trial demonstrated that the bifunctional resin (D-3696) was able to treat {approx} 110,000 bed volumes of groundwater before a 10% breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred under the column flow-through conditions (running at {approx} 2 bed volumes per minute). On the other hand, the Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E resin was able to treat {approx} 23,000 bed volumes of groundwater under the same experimental conditions. No pretreatment was needed to remove either dissolved organic matter or other competing anions (such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) in the groundwater, and the treatment process did not alter the water quality by removing or adding secondary by-products because of the high selectivity of the bifunctional resins. The results thus demonstrated that the new bifunctional resin could provide an efficient and ...
Date: May 20, 1999
Creator: Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater Using Highly-Selective, Regenerable Anion-Exchange Resins at Edwards Air Force Base

Description: Selective ion exchange is one of the most effective treatment technologies for removing low levels of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from contaminated water because of its high efficiency without adverse impacts on the water quality caused by adding or removing any chemicals or nutrients. This report summarizes both the laboratory and a field pilot-scale studies to determine the ability and efficiency of the bifunctional synthetic resins to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from the contaminated groundwater at the Edwards Air Force Base in California. Regeneration of the resins after groundwater treatment was also evaluated using the FeCl{sub 3}-HCl regeneration technique recently developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. On the basis of this study, the bifunctional resin, D-3696 was found to be highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed much better than one of the best commercial nitrate-selective resins (Purolite A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than the Purolite A-500 resin (with a relatively low selectivity). At an influent concentration of {approx} 450 {micro}g/L ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater, the bifunctional resin bed treated {approx} 40,000 empty bed volumes of groundwater before a significant breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred. The presence of relatively high concentrations of chloride and sulfate in site groundwater did not appear to affect the ability of the bifunctional resin to remove ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. However, the presence of high iron or iron oxyhydroxides and/or biomass in groundwater caused a significant fouling of the resin beds and greatly influenced the effectiveness in regenerating the resins sorbed with ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Under such circumstances, a prefilter ({approx} 0.5-1 {micro}m) was found to be necessary to remove these particulates and to reduce the risk of fouling of the resin beds. Without significant fouling, the resin bed could be effectively regenerated by the FeCl{sub 3} displacement technique. ...
Date: May 30, 2003
Creator: Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Method for In-situ Characterization of Important Actinides and Technetium Compounds via Fiberoptic Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

Description: This project serves to fill information gap through the development of a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to selectively and sensitively monitor and characterize the chemical speciation of radionuclides at trace levels. The SERS technique permits both of these measurements to be made simultaneously, and results in significant improvement over current methods in reducing time of analysis, cost, and sample manipulation. Our overall goal is (a) to develop a scientific basis for this new methodology to detect radionuclides via SERS and (b) to rationally synthesize and evaluate novel sol-gel based SERS substrates tailored to sensitively detect and characterize inorganic radionuclides such as TcO4 -, actinyl ions (e.g. UO2 2+, NpO2 +, and PuO2 2+) and other chemical compounds of interest.
Date: September 28, 2005
Creator: Sheng, Dai & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An investigation of groundwater organics, soil minerals, and activated carbon on the complexation, adsorption, and separation of technetium-99

Description: This report summarizes studies on the interactions of technetium-99 (Tc) with different organic compounds and soil minerals under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The report is divided into four parts and includes (1) effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the complexation and solubility of Tc, (2) complexation between Tc and trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solutions, (3) adsorption of Tc on soil samples from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), and (4) adsorption and separation of Tc on activated carbon. Various experimental techniques were applied to characterize and identify Tc complexation with organic compounds and TCE, including liquid-liquid extraction, membrane filtration, size exclusion, and gel chromatography. Results indicate, within the experimental error, Tc (as pertechnetate, TcO{sub 4}) did not appear to form complexes with groundwater or natural organic matter under both atmospheric and reducing conditions. However, Tc can form complexes with certain organic compounds or specific functional groups such as salicylate. Tc did not appear to form complexes with TCE in aqueous solution.Both liquid-liquid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) gave no indication Tc was complexed with TCE. The correlations between Tc and TCE concentrations in monitoring wells at PGDP may be a coincidence because TCE was commonly used as a decontamination reagent. Once TCE and Tc entered the groundwater, they behaved similarly because both TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and TCE are poorly adsorbed by soils. An effective remediation technique to remove TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from PGDP contaminated groundwater is needed. One possibility is the use of an activated carbon adsorption technique developed in this study.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Gu, B. & Dowlen, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Method for In-situ Characterization of Important Actinides and Technetium Compounds via Fiberoptic Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

Description: This project serves to fill information gap through the development of a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to selectively and sensitively monitor and characterize the chemical speciation of radionuclides at trace levels. The SERS technique permits both of these measurements to be made simultaneously, and results in significant improvement over current methods in reducing time of analysis, cost, and sample manipulation. Our overall goal is (a) to develop a scientific basis for this new methodology to detect radionuclides via SERS and (b) to rationally synthesize and evaluate novel sol-gel based SERS substrates tailored to sensitively detect and characterize inorganic radionuclides such as TcO4 -, actinyl ions (e.g. UO2 2+, NpO2 +, and PuO2 2+) and other chemical compounds of interest.
Date: June 15, 2003
Creator: Dai, Sheng & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Method for In-situ Characterization of Important Actinides and Technetium Compounds via Fiberoptic Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

Description: This project serves to fill information gap through the development of a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to selectively and sensitively monitor and characterize the chemical speciation of radionuclides at trace levels. The SERS technique permits both of these measurements to be made simultaneously, and results in significant improvement over current methods in reducing time of analysis, cost, and sample manipulation. Our overall goal is (a) to develop a scientific basis for this new methodology to detect radionuclides via SERS and (b) to rationally synthesize and evaluate novel sol-gel based SERS substrates tailored to sensitively detect and characterize inorganic radionuclides such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, actinyl ions (e.g. UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) and other chemical compounds of interest.
Date: June 24, 2004
Creator: Dai, Sheng & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

Description: Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Tio, J.; Wang, W. & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Factors Controlling In Situ Uranium and Technetium Bio-Reduction and Reoxidation at the NABIR Field Research Center

Description: Summary of Recent Field Testing: Extensive in situ (in ground) field testing using the push-pull method has demonstrated that indigenous microorganisms in the shallow (< 8 m) aquifer in FRC Areas 1 and 2 are capable of coupling the oxidation/fermentation of injected ethanol, glucose, or acetate to the reduction of U(VI) and Tc(VII). Despite highly variable initial (prior to testing) contaminant concentrations (pH: 3.3-7.2; Nitrate: 0.1-140 mM; U(VI): 1-12 uM; Tc(VII): 200-15000 pM), sequential donor additions resulted in increased rates of microbial activity (Denitrification: 01.-4.0 mM/hr; sulfate reduction: 0- 0.03 mM/hr; U(VI) reduction: 10-4 to 10-3 uM/hr; Tc(VII) reduction: 4-150 pM/hr) in all wells tested. Tc(VII) reduction and denitrification proceeded concomitantly in all tests. U(VI) reduction was concomitant with Fe(II) production in Area 1 but little Fe(II) was detected under sulfate reducing conditions in Area 2. Reoxidation of U(IV) (precipitated in the vicinity of the wells during previous tests) but not Tc(IV) was observed when injected test solutions contained initial nitrate concentrations > {approx} 20 mM. Field data and laboratory studies suggest that U(IV) is likely oxidized by Fe(III) minerals produced by enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation or by Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite. U(IV) reoxidation rates (10-3 to 10-2 uM/hr) were somewhat larger than U(VI) reduction rates indicating that sustained nitrate removal will be necessary to maintain the stability of U(IV) in this environment.
Date: May 5, 2004
Creator: Istok, Jonathan; Krumholz, L; McKinley, J. & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

Description: The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Gu, B. & Siegrist, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Method for In-situ Characterization of Important Actinides and Technetium Compounds via Fiberoptic Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)

Description: This project serves to fill information gap through the development of a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to selectively and sensitively monitor and characterize the chemical speciation of radionuclides at trace levels. The SERS technique permits both of these measurements to be made simultaneously, and results in significant improvement over current methods in reducing time of analysis, cost, and sample manipulation. Our overall goal is (a) to develop a scientific basis for this new methodology to detect radionuclides via SERS and (b) to rationally synthesize and evaluate novel sol-gel based SERS substrates tailored to sensitively detect and characterize inorganic radionuclides such as TcO4 -, actinyl ions (e.g. UO2 2+, NpO2 +, and PuO2 2+) and other chemical compounds of interest.
Date: June 15, 2002
Creator: Dai, Sheng & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by Fe and Fe-Pd bimetals in the presence of surfactants and cosolvents

Description: Surfactants and cosolvents are being used to enhance the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) from contaminated soils. However, the waste surfactant solution containing TCE and PCBs must be treated before it can be disposed. This study evaluated the use of zero-valence iron and palladized iron fillings on the dechlorination of TCE and a PCB congener in a dihexylsulfosuccinate surfactant solution. Batch experimental results indicated that TCE can be rapidly degraded by palladized iron filings with a half-life of 27.4 min. PCB was degraded at a slower rate than TCE with a half-life ranging from 100 min to 500 min as the concentration of surfactant increased. In column flow-through experiments, both TCE and PCBs degrade at an enhanced rate with a half-life about 1.5 and 6 min because of an increased solid to solution ratio in the column than in the batch experiments. Results of this work suggest that Fe-Pd filings may be potentially applicable for ex-situ treatment of TCE and PCBs in the surfactant solutions that are generated during surfactant washing of the contaminated soils.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Gu, B.; Liang, L.; West, O.R.; Cameron, P. & Davenport, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis and characterization of a new microporous cesium silicotitanate (SNL-B) molecular sieve

Description: Ongoing hydrothermal Cs-Ti-Si-O-H{sub 2}O phase investigations has produced several new ternary phases including a novel microporous Cs-silicotitanate molecular sieve, SNL-B with the approximate formula of Cs{sub 3}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9.5}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O. SNL-B is only the second molecular sieve Cs-silicotitanate phase reported to have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Crystallites are very small (0.1 x 2 microns) with a blade-like morphology. SNL-B is confirmed to be a 3-dimensional molecular sieve by a variety of characterization techniques (N{sub 2} adsorption, ion exchange, water adsorption/desorption, solid state CP-MAS NMR). SNL-B is able to desorb and adsorb water from its pores while retaining its crystal structure and exchanges Cs cations readily. Additional techniques were used to describe fundamental properties (powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, {sup 29}Si and {sup 133}/Cs MAS NMR, DTA, SEM/EDS, ion selectivity, and radiation stability). The phase relationships of metastable SNL-B to other hydrothermally synthesized Cs-Ti-Si-O-H{sub 2}O phases are discussed, particularly its relationship to a Cs-silicotitanate analogue of pharmacosiderite, and a novel condensed phase, a polymorph of Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15}(SNL-A).
Date: March 20, 2000
Creator: NYMAN,MAY D.; GU,B.X.; WANG,L.M.; EWING,R.C. & NENOFF,TINA M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anion retention in soil: Possible application to reduce migration of buried technetium and iodine

Description: This report summarizes a literature review of our present knowledge of the anion exchange properties of a number of soils and minerals, which may potentially be used as anion exchangers to retard migration of such anions as iodide (I{sup {minus}}), iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) and pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) away from disposal site. The amorphous clays allophane and imogolite, are found to be among the most important soil components capable of developing appreciable amounts of positive charge for anion exchange even at about neutral pH. Decreases in the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio and soil pH result in an increase in soil AEC. Allophane and imogolite rich soils have an AEC ranging from 1 to 18 meq/100g at pH about 6. Highly weathered soils dominated by Fe and Al oxides and kaolinite may develop a significant amount of AEC as soil pH falls. The retention of iodine (I) and technetium ({Tc}), by soils is associated with both soil organic matter, and Fe and Al oxides, whereas sorption on layer silicate minerals in negligible. Fe and Al oxides become more important in the retention of anionic I{sup {minus}}, IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} as pH falls, since more positive charge is developed on the oxide surfaces. Although few studies, if any, have been conducted on I and {Tc} sorption by soil allophane and imogolite, it is estimated that a surface plough soil (2 million pounds soil per acre) with 5 meq/100g AEC, as is commonly found in andisols, shall retain approximately 5900 kg I and 4500 kg {Tc}. It is conceivable that an anion exchanger such as an andisol could be used to modify the near field environment of a radioactive waste disposal facility. This whole disposal system would then offer similar migration resistance to anions as is normally ...
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Gu, B. & Schulz, R.K. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil Science)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2: Site characterization report of the Pit 1 area

Description: A treatability study was initiated in October 1993, initially encompassing the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was to have supported a possible Interim Record of Decision (IROD) or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches as early as FY 1997. The Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 7, which contains these seven seepage pits and trenches, will probably not begin until after the year 2000. This treatability study will establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability to overlap melt settings that are necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. This report summarizes the site characterization information gathered through the end of September 1996 which supports the planning and assessment of ISV for Pit 1 (objective 4 above).
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Spalding, B.P.; Bogle, M.A.; Cline, S.R.; Naney, M.T. & Gu, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated experimental and computational methods for structure determination and characterization of a new, highly stable cesium silicotitanate phase, Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} (SNL-A)

Description: Exploratory hydrothermal synthesis in the system Cs{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O has produced a new polymorph of Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} (SNL-A) whose structure was determined using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques ({sup 29}Si and {sup 133}Cs NMR, X-ray Rietveld refinement, and Density Functional Theory). SNL-A crystallizes in the monoclinic space-group Cc with unit cell parameters: a = 12.998(2) {angstrom}, b = 7.5014(3) {angstrom}, c = 15.156(3) {angstrom}, {eta} = 105.80(3) {degree}. The SNL-A framework consists of silicon tetrahedra and titanium octahedra which are linked in 3-, 5-, 6-, 7- and 8-membered rings in three dimensions. SNL-A is distinctive from a previously reported C2/c polymorph of Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} by different ring geometries. Similarities and differences between the two structures are discussed. Other characterizations of SNL-A include TGA-DTA, Cs/Si/Ti elemental analyses, and SEM/EDS. Furthermore, the chemical and radiation durability of SNL-A was studied in interest of ceramic waste form applications. These studies show that SNL-A is durable in both radioactive and rigorous chemical environments. Finally, calculated cohesive energies of the two Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} polymorphs suggest that the SNL-A phase (synthesized at 200 C) is energetically more favorable than the C2/c polymorph (synthesized at 1,050 C).
Date: April 24, 2000
Creator: NYMAN,MAY D.; BONHOMME,FRANCOIS R.; TETER,DAVID M.; MAXWELL,R.S.; GU,B.X.; WANG,L.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate

Description: Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Dale, M; Sturchio, Neil C; Caffee, M; Belosa, A D; Heraty, Jr., L J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of Nitrate Exposure on the Functional Structure of a Microbial Community in a Uranium-contaminated Aquifer

Description: Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Van Nostrand, Joy; Waldron, P.; Wu, W.; Zhou, B.; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A field trial of novel bifunctional resins for removing pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) from contaminated groundwater

Description: A field trial using a custom-designed bifunctional synthetic resin prepared at the University of Tennessee and designed to selectively remove pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) from groundwater was conducted in summer 1997 at the Northwest Plume Pump-and-Treat Facility at the US Department of Energy`s Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site. The bifunctional resin, RO-02-119, was a copolymer of vinylbenzylchloride and divinylbenzene that had been functionalized with trihexylamine and triethylamine. The experiment was a parallel test of the synthetic resin and a commercial resin, Purolite A-520E, to directly compare the performance of the two resins. Purolite resin is currently used by the treatment facility to remove Tc-99 from the contaminated groundwater containing {approximately}1,000 pCi/L TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. A total of {approximately}692,000 bed volumes of groundwater was passed through the column containing the synthetic resin (RO-02-119) whereas only {approximately}205,000 bed volumes of groundwater were passed through the Purolite resin column because of reduced hydraulic conductivity and clogging within the latter column. Despite less groundwater passing through the Purolite resin column, however, the breakthrough of TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} occurred earlier in the Purolite column than in the RO-02-119 column.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Gu, B.; Liang, L.; Brown, G. M.; Bonnesen, P. V.; Moyer, B. A.; Alexandratos, S. D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Application of zero-valence iron and palladized iron for treatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene and technetium-99

Description: The overall goal of this portion of the project was to package one or more unit processes, as modular components in vertical and/or horizontal recirculation wells, for treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [e.g., trichloroethene (TCE)] and radionuclides [e.g., technetium (Tc){sup 99}] in groundwater. The project was conceived, in part, because the coexistence of chlorinated hydrocarbons and radionuclides has been identified as the predominant combination of groundwater contamination in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Thus, a major component of the project was the development of modules that provide simultaneous treatment of hydrocarbons and radionuclides. The project objectives included: (1) evaluation of horizontal wells for inducing groundwater recirculation, (2) development of below-ground treatment modules for simultaneous removal of VOCs and radionuclides, and (3) demonstration of a coupled system (treatment module with recirculation well) at a DOE field site where both VOCs and radionuclides are present in the groundwater. This report is limited to the innovative treatment aspects of the program. A report on pilot testing of the horizontal recirculation system was the first report of the series (Muck et al. 1996). A comprehensive report that focuses on the engineering, cost and hydrodynamic aspects of the project has also been prepared (Korte et al. 1997a).
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Korte, N.E.; Muck, M.T.; Zutman, J.L.; Schlosser, R.M.; Liang, L.; Gu, B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Factors Controlling In Situ Uranium and Technetium Bioreductionat the NABIR Field Research Center

Description: This research hypotheses is: (1) Indigenous microorganisms in the shallow aquifer at the FRC have the capability to reduce U(VI) and Tc(VII) but rates are limited by--Scarce electron donor, Low pH and potentially toxic metals, and High nitrate. (2) U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction rates can be increased by--Successive donor additions, Raising pH to precipitate toxic metals, and Adding humics to complex toxic metals and serve as electron shuttles.
Date: March 17, 2004
Creator: Istok, J.; Jones, J.; Park, M.; Sapp, M.; Selko, E.; Laughman, R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

Description: A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.
Date: February 15, 2010
Creator: Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamics of microbial community composition and function during in-situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

Description: A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter{sup -1}). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.
Date: August 15, 2010
Creator: Nostrand, J.D. Van; Wu, L.; Wu, W.M.; Huang, A.; Gentry, T.J.; Deng, Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department