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Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture

Description: A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.
Date: August 19, 2003
Creator: Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland & Majer, Ernest L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

Description: This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO{sub 2} flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO{sub 2} injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO{sub 2} relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio show CO{sub 2}-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO{sub 2}. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO{sub 2} than are any of the individual images of ...
Date: 2002-10~
Creator: Hoversten, G. M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John & Daley, Tom
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic methods for resource exploration in enhanced geothermal systems

Description: A finite-difference modeling study of seismic wave propagation was conducted to determine how to best investigate subsurface faults and fracture zones in geothermal areas. The numerical model was created based on results from a previous seismic reflection experiment. A suite of fault models was investigated including blind faults and faults with surface expressions. The seismic data suggest that blind faults can be detected by a sudden attenuation of seismic wave amplitudes, as long the fault is located below the receiver array. Additionally, a conversion from P- to S-waves indicates the reflection and refraction of the P-waves while propagating across the fault. The drop in amplitudes and the excitation of S-waves can be used to estimate the location of the fault at depth. The accuracy of the numerical modeling depends on the availability of a priori in situ information (velocity and density) from borehole experiments in the geothermal area.
Date: June 12, 2002
Creator: Gritto, Roland & Majer, Ernest L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inversion of Scattered Waves for Material Properties in Fractured Rock

Description: The authors apply a recently developed low-frequency, non-linear inversion method which includes near and far field terms to a crosshole data set to determine the bulk and shear modulus, as well as the density for a fractured zone in a granitic rock mass. The method uses the scattered elastic wavefield which is extracted from the recorded data before the inversion is performed. The inversion result is appraised by investigating the resolution and standard deviation of the model estimates. The sensitivity of the three parameters to different features of the medium is revealed. While the bulk modulus appears to be sensitive to voids and welded contacts, the density is mostly affected by fractured zones. The shear modulus is least constrained due to the absence of S wave anisotropy information. It is shown that the three medium parameters are generally sensitive to other medium features than those determined by velocity inversions. Thus this method is viewed as a complimentary approach to travel time tomography which provides more insight into the material properties of inhomogeneous media.
Date: July 1999
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri A. & Johnson, Lane R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites (Interim Report)

Description: Finite difference modeling with 2-dimensional models were conducted to evaluate the performance of source-receiver arrays to locate UXO in littoral environments. The model parameters were taken from measurements in coastal areas with typical bay mud and from examples in the literature. Seismic arrays are well suited to focus energy by steering the elements of the array to any point in the medium that acts as an energy source. This principle also applies to seismic waves that are backscattered by buried UXO. The power of the array is particularly evident in strong noise conditions when the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to observe the scattered signal on the seismograms. Using a seismic array, it was possible to detect and locate the UXO with a reliability similar to noise free situations. When the UXO was positioned within 3-6 wavelengths of the incident signal from the source array, the resolution was good enough to determine the dimensions of the UXO from the scattered waves. Beyond this distance this distinction decreased gradually while the location and the center of the UXO were still determined reliably. The location and the dimensions of two adjacent UXO were resolved down to a separation of 1/3 of the dominant wavelength of the incident wave, at which time interference effects began to appear. In the investigated cases, the ability to locate a UXO was independent on the use of a model with a rippled or a flat seafloor, as long as the array was located above the UXO. Nevertheless, the correct parameters of the seafloor interface were obtained in these cases. An investigation to find the correct migration velocity in the sediments to locate the UXO revealed that a range of velocity gradients centered around the correct velocity model produced comparable results, which needs to be further investigated with ...
Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Nihei, Kurt & Johnson, Lane
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO2 gas/oil ratio prediction in a multi-component reservoir bycombined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

Description: Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity and electrical conductivity during a CO2 injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization using Archie's law provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity and the electrical conductivity. The rock properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. The electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation. The estimated changes in water saturation are used with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO2 relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. The residual compressional velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO2 /oil ratio. Resulting images of CO2/oil ratio show CO2 rich zones that are well correlated with the location of injection perforations with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO2. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO2 than are any of the individual images of change in geophysical parameters.
Date: August 28, 2002
Creator: Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John & Daley, Tom
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated seismic studies at the Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada

Description: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional ray tracing was performed to simulate wave propagation from the surface sources to the receiver at depth. Travel time differences between observed and calculated times were mapped to topographic changes in the elevation of the interface between the carbonate basement and the sedimentary and volcanic unit above. Results indicate the presence of two dominant geologic features. The first confirms the regional trend of the geologic units in the Basin and Range province with a north-south strike and dip to the west, as expected for normal faulting encountered in an extensional regime. The second is a local disturbance of this regional pattern in form of an elevation of the interface between the carbonate basement and the overlying sedimentary sequence, striking east-west. The geometry of the structure is corroborated by results from a seismic-reflection survey, and by results of tomographic studies conducted as part of the seismic survey. Seismic waves, generated from far-offset shots during the 3-D surface survey, exhibit a sudden decrease in amplitudes while propagating across the boundaries of the elevation high. This apparent boundary correlates spatially with the location of the Rye Patch fault as interpreted from the 3-D seismic reflection data. Finite-difference modeling of elastic wave propagation is performed to estimate the structural parameters of the fault. Questions to ...
Date: May 23, 2002
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M. & Majer, Ernest L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic monitoring of CO2sequestration

Description: The quantitative estimation of changes in water saturation (S{sub W}) and effective pressure (P), in terms of changes in compressional and shear impedance, is becoming routine in the interpretations of time-lapse surface seismic data. However, when the number of reservoir constituents increases to include in situ gas and injected CO{sub 2}, there are too many parameters to be determined from seismic velocities or impedances alone. In such situations, the incorporation of electromagnetic (EM) images showing the change in electrical conductivity ({sigma}) provides essential independent information. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate a methodology for jointly interpreting crosswell seismic and EM data, in conjunction with detailed constitutive relations between geophysical and reservoir parameters, to quantitatively predict changes in P, S{sub W}, CO{sub 2} gas saturation (S{sub CO2}), CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio (R{sub CO{sub 2}}), hydrocarbon gas saturation (S{sub g}), and hydrocarbon gas/oil ration (R{sub g}) in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood.
Date: July 30, 2002
Creator: Hoversten, G. Michael; Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M.; Majer,Ernest L. & Myer, Larry R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Subsurface void detection using seismic tomographic imaging

Description: Tomographic imaging has been widely used in scientific and medical fields to remotely image media in a nondestructive way. This paper introduces a spectrum of seismic imaging applications to detect and characterize voids in coal mines. The application of seismic waves to detect changes in coal relies on two types of waves: body waves refracted along the interface between coal and bedrock (i.e., refracted P-waves) and channel waves that propagate directly through the coal (dispersive wave trains of the Rayleigh or Love type). For example, a P-wave tomography study to find underlying old mine workings in a coal mine in England, produced velocity patterns that revealed increases in velocity where high stress concentrations occur in the rock, which are most likely connected to old pillars left in support of the old working areas. At the same time, low velocities were found in areas of low stress concentrations, which are related to roof collapses indicating the locations of mined areas below. The application of channel wave tomography to directly image the presence of gaseous CO{sub 2} in a low velocity oil reservoir showed that the injected CO{sub 2} followed an ancient flow channel in the reservoir migrating from the injector to the producer well. The study showed how channel waves are preferable over refracted P-waves, as the latter were only marginally affected by the presence of the gas in the low-velocity channel. Similar approaches show great promise for the detection of voids in coal mines. Finally, a newly developed technique, based on scattering theory, revealed that the location and the size of a subsurface cavity could be accurately determined even in the presence of strong correlated and uncorrelated noise.
Date: June 26, 2003
Creator: Gritto, Roland
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Imaging of CO{sub 2} injection during an enhanced-oil-recovery experiment

Description: A series of time-lapse seismic cross well and single well experiments were conducted in a diatomite reservoir to monitor the injection of CO{sub 2} into a hydrofracture zone, using P- and S-wave data. During the first phase the set of seismic experiments were conducted after the injection of water into the hydrofrac-zone. The set of seismic experiments was repeated after a time period of 7 months during which CO{sub 2} was injected into the hydrofractured zone. The issues to be addressed ranged from the detectability of the geologic structure in the diatomic reservoir to the detectability of CO{sub 2} within the hydrofracture. During the pre-injection experiment, the P-wave velocities exhibited relatively low values between 1700-1900 m/s, which decreased to 1600-1800 m/s during the post-injection phase (-5 percent). The analysis of the pre-injection S-wave data revealed slow S-wave velocities between 600-800 m/s, while the post-injection data revealed velocities between 500-700 m/s (-6 percent). These velocity estimates produced high Poisson ratios between 0.36 and 0.46 for this highly porous ({approx} 50 percent) material. Differencing post- and pre-injection data revealed an increase in Poisson ratio of up to 5 percent. Both, velocity and Poisson estimates indicate the dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the liquid phase of the reservoir accompanied by a pore-pressure increase. The results of the cross well experiments were corroborated by single well data and laboratory measurements on core data.
Date: April 29, 2003
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M. & Myer, Larry R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Joint Cross Well and Single Well Seismic Studies at Lost Hills, California

Description: A series of time-lapse seismic cross well and single well experiments were conducted in a diatomite reservoir to monitor the injection of CO{sub 2} into a hydrofracture zone, based on P- and S-wave data. A high-frequency piezo-electric P-wave source and an orbital-vibrator S-wave source were used to generate waves that were recorded by hydrophones as well as three-component geophones. The injection well was located about 12 m from the source well. During the pre-injection phase water was injected into the hydrofrac-zone. The set of seismic experiments was repeated after a time interval of 7 months during which CO{sub 2} was injected into the hydrofractured zone. The questions to be answered ranged from the detectability of the geologic structure in the diatomic reservoir to the detectability of CO{sub 2} within the hydrofracture. Furthermore it was intended to determine which experiment (cross well or single well) is best suited to resolve these features. During the pre-injection experiment, the P-wave velocities exhibited relatively low values between 1700-1900 m/s, which decreased to 1600-1800 m/s during the post-injection phase (-5%). The analysis of the pre-injection S-wave data revealed slow S-wave velocities between 600-800 m/s, while the post-injection data revealed velocities between 500-700 m/s (-6%). These velocity estimates produced high Poisson ratios between 0.36 and 0.46 for this highly porous ({approx} 50%) material. Differencing post- and pre-injection data revealed an increase in Poisson ratio of up to 5%. Both, velocity and Poisson estimates indicate the dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the liquid phase of the reservoir accompanied by a pore-pressure increase. The single well data supported the findings of the cross well experiments. P- and S-wave velocities as well as Poisson ratios were comparable to the estimates of the cross well data. The cross well experiment did not detect the presence of the hydrofracture but appeared ...
Date: June 25, 2002
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M. & Myer, Larry R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Workshop on induced Seismicity due to fluid injection/production from Energy-Related Applications

Description: Geothermal energy, carbon sequestration, and enhanced oil and gas recovery have a clear role in U.S. energy policy, both in securing cost-effective energy and reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} accumulations. Recent publicity surrounding induced seismicity at several geothermal and oil and gas sites points out the need to develop improved standards and practices to avoid issues that may unduly inhibit or stop the above technologies from fulfilling their full potential. It is critical that policy makers and the general community be assured that EGS, CO{sub 2} sequestration, enhanced oil/gas recovery, and other technologies relying on fluid injections, will be designed to reduce induced seismicity to an acceptable level, and be developed in a safe and cost-effective manner. Induced seismicity is not new - it has occurred as part of many different energy and industrial applications (reservoir impoundment, mining, oil recovery, construction, waste disposal, conventional geothermal). With proper study/research and engineering controls, induced seismicity should eventually allow safe and cost-effective implementation of any of these technologies. In addition, microseismicity is now being used as a remote sensing tool for understanding and measuring the success of injecting fluid into the subsurface in a variety of applications, including the enhancement of formation permeability through fracture creation/reactivation, tracking fluid migration and storage, and physics associated with stress redistribution. This potential problem was envisaged in 2004 following observed seismicity at several EGS sites, a study was implemented by DOE to produce a white paper and a protocol (Majer et al 2008) to help potential investors. Recently, however, there have been a significant number of adverse comments by the press regarding induced seismicity which could adversely affect the development of the energy sector in the USA. Therefore, in order to identify critical technology and research that was necessary not only to make fluid injections safe, but an ...
Date: April 1, 2011
Creator: Majer, E.L.; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Rueter, Horst; Stump, Brian; Segall, Paul; Zoback, Mark et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department