66 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Tables of thermodynamic functions for gaseous thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxides

Description: Measured and estimated spectroscopic data for thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxide vapor species have been used with the methods of statistical mechanics to calculate thermodynamic functions. Some inconsistencies between spectroscopic data and some thermodynamic data have been resolved by recalculating ..delta..H/sup 0//sub f/ (298.15/sup 0/K) values for the vapor species of these oxides. Evaluation of the uncertainties in data, methods of estimating molecular parameters, and effects of assumptions have been discussed elsewhere. The tables of thermodynamic functions that were reported earlier have been revised principally because the low-frequency vibrational modes of UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 3/ have now been measured. These new empirical data resulted in changes in the electronic contributions to the calculated thermodynamic functions of UO/sub 2/ and the estimated vibrational contributions for PuO/sub 2/. In addition, some minor changes have been made in the methods of calculation of the electronic contributions for all molecules.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Green, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of the thermodynamic properties of fuel-vapor species from spectroscopic data

Description: Measured spectroscopic data, estimated molecular parameters, and a densty-of-states model for electronic structure have been used to calculate thermodynamic functions for gaseous ThO, ThO/sub 2/, UO, UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 3/, PuO, and PuO/sub 2/. Various methods for estimating parameters have been considered and numerically evaluated. The sensitivity of the calculated thermodynamic functions to molecular parameters has been examined quantitatively. New values of the standard enthalpies of formation at 298.15/sup 0/K have been derived from the best available ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f/ equations and the calculated thermodynamic functions. Estimates of the uncertainties have been made for measured and estimated data as well as for various mathematical and physical approximations. Tables of the thermodynamic functions to 6000/sup 0/K are recommended for gaseous thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxides.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Green, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric uranium dioxide at high temperatures

Description: Thermodynamic functions of the gaseous species, thermodynamic functions of the condensed phase, and an oxygen-potential model have been combined to calculate the vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with condensed-phase UO/sub 2-x/ for 1500 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 6000 K and 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.5. A method for extending the oxygen-potential model of Blackburn to the liquid region has been derived and evaluated. New thermodynamic functions of the UO/sub 2/ condensed phase have been derived from the best available data, including the heat capacity recommended by Fink.
Date: June 1, 1981
Creator: Green, D.W. & Leibowitz, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a method for evaluating carbon dioxide miscible flooding prospects. Final report

Description: Research was undertaken to develop a method of evaluating reservoirs as prospects for carbon dioxide flooding. Evaluation was to be based on a determination of miscibility pressure and displacement efficiency under idealized conditions. To reach the objective, project work was divided into five areas: (1) conducting of phase-equilibrium studies of carbon dioxide with synthetic oils; (2) application of an equation of state to simulate the phase behavior of carbon dioxide - oil systems; (3) conducting of linear displacements of crude oils and synthetic oils by carbon dioxide in a slim-tube apparatus; (4) application of the equation of state, the phase-behavior data and slim-tube data to develop a method of screening reservoirs for carbon dioxide flooding based on determination of minimum miscibility pressure and displacement efficiency; (5) development of a one-dimensional mathematical model, based on the equation of state, for application in conjunction with the results of Parts 1 to 4. The accomplishments for these five areas are discussed in five chapters. 44 references, 90 figures, 42 tables.
Date: March 1, 1985
Creator: Green, D.W. & Swift, G.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems. Annual report, September 25, 1994--September 24, 1995

Description: The objectives of the research program are to (1) identify and develop polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) develop methods to predict their performance in field applications. The research focused on four types of gel systems -- KUSP1 systems which contain an aqueous polysaccharide designated KUSP1, phenolic-aldehyde systems composed of resorcinol and formaldehyde, colloidal-dispersion systems composed of polyacrylamide and aluminum citrate, and a chromium-based system where polyacrylamide is crosslinked by chromium(III). Gelation behavior of the resorcinol-formaldehyde systems and the KUSP1-borate system was examined. Size distributions of aggregates that form in the polyacrylamide-aluminum colloidal-dispersion gel system were determined. Permeabilities to brine of several rock materials were significantly reduced by gel treatments using the KUSP1 polymer-ester (monoethylphthalate) system, the KUSP1 polymer-boric acid system, and the sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde system. The KUSP1 polymer-ester system and the sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde system were also shown to significantly reduce the permeability to super-critical carbon dioxide. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the behavior of a chromium redox-polyacrylamide gel system that is injected through a wellbore into a multi-layer reservoir in which crossflow between layers is allowed. The model describes gelation kinetics and filtration of pre-gel aggregates in the reservoir. Studies using the model demonstrated the effect filtration of gel aggregates has on the placement of gel systems in layered reservoirs.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Description: Objectives of this project are to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance to fluid displacement systems; determine the performance of these systems; and to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. Gels investigated include an aqueous polysaccharide, a chromium-polacrylamide, and an aluminium citrate-polyacrylamide system.
Date: October 17, 1995
Creator: Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems. Fourteenth quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

Description: The general objectives are to (1) to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) to determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. This work focuses on three types of gel systems - an aqueous polysaccharide (KUSP1) system that gels as a function of pH, the chromium(III)-polyacrylamide system and the aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide system. Laboratory research is directed at the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the gelation process in bulk form and in porous media. This knowledge will be used to develop conceptual and mathematical models of the gelation process. Mathematical models will then be extended to predict the performance of gelled polymer treatments in oil reservoirs. Technical progress of Task III, mechanisms of in situ gelation is presented in this progress report.
Date: May 5, 1996
Creator: Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term. Annual report, June 18, 1993--June 18, 1994

Description: Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems. Annual report, September 15, 1993--September 24, 1994

Description: The objectives of the research program are to (1) identify and develop polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) develop methods to predict their performance in field applications. The research focuses on three types of aqueous gel systems - a polysaccharide (KUSP1) that gels as a function of pH, a polyacrylamide-chromium(III) system and a polyacrylamide-aluminum citrate system. This report describes work conducted during the second year of a three-year program. Progress was made in the utilization of KUSP1 as a gelling agent. It was shown that gels can be formed in situ in porous media using CO{sub 2} or ester hydrolysis to lower pH. An ester was identified that could be used in field-scale operations. It was determined that KUSP1 will form strong gels when ortho boric acid is added to the system. It was also determined, in cooperation with Abbott Laboratories, that KUSP1 can be produced on a commercial scale. Rheological studies showed that shear rate significantly affects gelation time and gel strength. The effect of rock-fluid interactions at alkaline conditions was examined experimentally and through mathematical modeling. A model was developed that treats non-equilibrium conditions and this is an improvement over previously published models.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium dioxide at high temperatures

Description: Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with a hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium dioxide condensed phase (U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/)O/sub 2-x/, as functions of T, x, and y, have been calculated for 0.0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.1, 0.0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 0.3, and for the temperature range 2500 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 6000 K. The range of compositions and temperatures was limited to the region of interest to reactor safety analysis. Thermodynamic functions for the condensed phase and for each of the gaseous species were combined with an oxygen potential model to obtain partial pressures of O, O/sub 2/, Pu, PuO, PuO/sub 2/, U, UO, UO/sub 2/, and UO/sub 3/ as functions of T, x, and y.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Green, D.W.; Fink, J.K. & Leibowitz, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric plutonium dioxide at high temperatures

Description: Vapor pressures and vapor compositions have been calculated for 1500 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 4000/sup 0/K. Thermodynamic functions for the condensed phase and for each of the gaseous species were combined with an oxygen-potential model extended into the liquid region to obtain the partial pressures of O/sub 2/, O, Pu, PuO and PuO/sub 2/. The calculated oxygen pressures increase very rapidly as stoichiometry is approached. At least part of this increase is a consequence of the exclusion of Pu/sup 6 +/ from the oxygen-potential model. No reliable method was found to estimate the importance of this ion. As a result of large oxygen potentials at high temperatures, extremely high total pressures that produced unreasonably high vapor densities were calculated. The highest temperature was therefore limited to 400 K, and the range of oxygen-to-metal ratios was limited to 1.994 to 1.70. These calculations show that vapor in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric plutonium dioxide is poorly approximated as PuO/sub 2/ for most of the temperture and composition range of interest. The vapor is much more oxygen-rich than the condensed phase. Implications for the (U,Pu)O/sub 2-x/ system are discussed. (DLC)
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Green, D.W.; Fink, J.K. & Leibowitz, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric plutonium dioxide at high temperatures

Description: Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with a hypostoichiometric plutonium dioxide condensed phase have been calculated for the temperature range 1500 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 4000 K. Thermodynamic functions for the condensed phase and for each of the gaseous species were combined with an oxygen-potential model to obtain the partial pressures of O/sub 2/, O, Pu, PuO, and PuO/sub 2/. New thermodynamic functions for the solid oxide were calculated from available information and from new estimates of the heat capacity of the liquid. Thermodynamic functions for the vapor species were calculated previously. A suitable oxygen-potential model has been used previously for the solid hypostoichiometric plutonium dioxide; this model has been extended into the liquid region using several alternative methods. The effects of these alternatives on the calculated oxygen pressures have been examined in detail.
Date: June 1, 1982
Creator: Green, D.W.; Fink, J.K. & Leibowitz, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985

Description: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab.
Date: December 1, 1985
Creator: Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R. & Jensen, K.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems

Description: The general objectives are to (1) to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) to determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. This work focuses on three types of gel systems - an aqueous polysaccharide (KUSPI) system that gels as a function of pH, the chromium-based system where polyacrylamide and xanthan are crosslinked by CR(III) and an organic crosslinked system. Development of the KUSPI system and evaluation and identification of a suitable organic crosslinked system will be done. The laboratory research is directed at the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the gelation process in bulk form and in porous media. This knowledge will be used to develop conceptual and mathematical models of the gelation process. Mathematical models will then be extended to predict the performance of gelled polymer treatments in oil reservoirs. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: development and selection of gelled polymer systems, physical and chemical characterization of gel systems; and mathematical modeling of gel systems.
Date: April 9, 1993
Creator: Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

Description: The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S. & Bowers, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term -- Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--October 1, 1995

Description: This report represents a summary of the progress during the first year of Budget period 1 of the project. Two examples of advanced technologies developed as part of this project are highlighted along with the use of the Internet to transfer these technologies. The two advanced technologies are a spread-sheet petrophysical analysis and reservoir evaluation (PfEFFER), and a petrophysical/seismic approach to well logs (pseudoseismic). Work continues on multi-disciplinary reservoir characterization at the demonstration site. The potential for incremental primary recovery is being evaluated using the improved reservoir characterization to target infill drilling and evaluate the potential of a horizontal well. The impact of demonstrating additional incremental primary recovery from sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity Mississippian reservoirs would be significant for Kansas and the US.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1999

Description: This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 (October 1998 through September 1999). This annual progress report, which is the sixteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.
Date: June 15, 2000
Creator: Green, D. W.; Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L. & Graczyk, D. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increased Oil Recovery from Mature Oil Fields Using Gelled Polymer Treatments

Description: Gelled polymer treatments were applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report is aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of these treatments by developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and by developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. Procedures were developed to determine the weight-average molecular weight and average size of polyacrylamide samples in aqueous solutions. Sample preparation techniques were key to achieving reproducible results.
Date: March 28, 2001
Creator: Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W. & McCool, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increased Oil Recovery from Mature Oil Fields Using Gelled Polymer Treatments

Description: This report describes the progress of the first year of a three-year research program. This program is aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of gelled polymer treatments by (1) developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, (2) determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and (3) developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production.
Date: January 22, 2001
Creator: Willhite, G.P.; Green, D.W. & McCool, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 2000

Description: This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 (October 1999 through September 2000). This annual progress report, which is the seventeenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates within the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but it has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients--Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others--and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems that reflects the diversity of research and development (R&D) work at ANL. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL operates more typically in a problem-solving mode in which development of methods is required or adaptation of techniques is needed to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL works with clients and commercial laboratories if a large number of routine analyses are required. Much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to applied analytical chemistry research work.
Date: April 3, 2001
Creator: Green, D. W.; Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L. & Graczyk, D.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas near term Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--March 15, 1997

Description: This annual report describes progress during the second year of the project entitled {open_quotes}Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas{close_quotes}. This project funded under the Department of Energy`s Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, several tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated. These include: (1) a new approach to subsurface visualization using electric logs ({open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{open_quotes}); (2) a low-cost easy-to-use spreadsheet log analysis software (PfEFFER); and (3) an extension of the BOAST-3 computer program for full field reservoir simulation. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). These results include an outline of the reservoir description based on available and newly acquired data and reservoir simulation results. Detailed information is available on-line through the Internet. Based on the reservoir simulation, three infill wells will be drilled to validate the reservoir description and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies. The demonstration phase of the project has just begun and will be presented in the next annual report.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical chemistry laboratory. Progress report for FY 1997

Description: The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1996 through September 1997). This annual progress report is the fourteenth in this series for the ACL, and it describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S. & Bowers, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas, near term, Class 2. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

Description: The objective of this project is to demonstrate incremental reserves from Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) dolomite reservoirs in western Kansas through application of reservoir characterization to identify areas of unrecovered mobile oil. The project addresses producibility problems in two fields: Specific reservoirs target the Schaben Field in Ness County, Kansas, and the Bindley Field in Hodgeman County, Kansas. The producibility problems to be addressed include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, non-optimum recovery efficiency. The results of this project will be disseminated through various technology transfer activities. Work in this quarter has continued to concentrate on Task 1.2 reservoir characterization and Task 1.3 technology transfer.
Date: February 4, 1997
Creator: Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W. & Willhite, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department