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Studies on Malic Enzyme from Hymenolepis Diminuta

Description: Malic enzyme from the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, has been purified 320-fold to a final specific activity of 29.4. The purification procedure included heat treatment, followed by column chromatography with Sephadex G-20, two phosphocellulose columns, and Sephadex G-200, respectively. The final purified enzyme appeared to be homogeneous on disc gel electrophoresis and G-200 gel filtration.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Li, Tung
Partner: UNT Libraries

Lactate Dehydrogenase of Hymenolepis Diminuta: Isolation and Characterization

Description: Lactate dehydrogenase was isolated in pure form from crude extract of the cestode Hymenoleois diminuta by heat treatment and column chromatography. The purified enzyme has a specific activity of 106 units per mg protein. The molecular weight of the purified protein was 75,000 as determined by Sephadex gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation. An equilibrium ultracentrifugation study suggests a subunit molecular weight of 39,000. From these data, a dimer form of the native enzyme is proposed.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Burke, William F.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Studies of the Interaction of LCAT with Lipoprotein Substrates in HDL Deficient Plasma Systems

Description: Enzymatic and lipid transfer reactions involved in reverse cholesterol transport were studied in HDL deficient plasma systems. Fasting plasma samples were obtained from control and cholesterol fed guinea pigs as well as from a fish eye disease patient and were used to localize the enzyme LCAT among plasma lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL, and HDL). In both guinea pig and fish eye disease patient plasma, the LCAT activity was found in association with the HDL type particles. Cholesterol feeding in guinea pigs altered the properties of lipoprotein substrates for LCAT resulting in some changes, specifically: 1) decreased fractional rate of plasma cholesterol esterification and, 2) lower transfer of free cholesterol (FC) and esterified cholesterol (CE) within the lipoprotein fractions.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Paranjape, Sulabha
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Quantitative Radioimmunoassay for Phosphoglucose Isomerase and Its Utilization in Detecting Cross-Reactive Material in Variant Forms of Phosphoglucose Isomerase and in Human Tissues

Description: A method for purification and radiolabelling phosphoglucose isomerase was devised in order to develop a sensitive quantitative radioimmunoassay for the detection of the enzyme irrespective of its catalytic activity. For four genetic variants of PGI no difference in the molecular specific activity was observed. In one variant (PGI-Denton), liver and heart tissue extracts, and in mature erythrocytes (as compared to normal erythrocytes), a decreased molecular specific activity was observed which initially may imply that these samples contain cross-reactive material which is not catalytically active.
Date: May 1979
Creator: Purdy, Kimberly L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chemical Cleavage of Human Phosphoglucose Isomerase at Cysteine

Description: The present study has resulted in the development of a procedure for the specific chemical fragmentation of human phosphoglucose isomerase into a minimal number of peptides. A two-cycle procedure for cleaving the protein with 2-nitro-5- thiocyanobenzoic acid results in four primary peptides and three overlap peptides. The peptides can be readily separated on the basis of their size by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Preliminary peptide alignments have been considered, and amino acid analyses have been performed. End-terminal analyses of the enzyme revealed a carboxyl terminal sequence of Asp-Val-Gln and a blocked amino terminus. The cysteine cleavage procedure provides an excellent method for the identification and location of specific genetic mutations of human phosphoglucose isomerase.
Date: December 1975
Creator: Conn, Worth R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Isozymes and In Vivo Activity of Triosephosphate Isomerase

Description: The distribution of isozymes of triosephosphate isomerase was normal in all human tissues examined. This finding argues against the existence of tissue-specific isozymes. Normal distributions of isozymes were also found in patients with cri-du-chat syndrome. Thus it is unlikely that a gene for triosephosphate isomerase is located on the short arm of chromosome five in man. When triosephosphate isomerases from a wide range of species were examined by starch gel electrophoresis, definite evolutionary patterns were found. Kinetic studies were conducted on human triosephosphate isomerase under conditions simulating the intracellular environment of the erythrocyte. Calculations using the kinetic parameters obtained indicate that even in triosephosphate isomerase deficiency disease, enough enzyme activity remains that the rate of glycolysis should not become inhibited.
Date: May 1974
Creator: Snapka, Robert Morris
Partner: UNT Libraries

Characterization of Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Isomerase of Different Sizes

Description: Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) was purified from human placenta utilizing cross-linked spherical particle phosphocellulose. In three steps, GPI could be purified approximately 5500 fold with greater than 50% recovery. The purified enzyme exhibited four bands upon non-denaturing PAGE and isoelectric focusing (IEF) when stained with GPI specific activity stain. The four isozymes were isolated by preparative IEF. The isoelectric points of the isozymes were determined. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis showed two types of subunits with different molecular weights. Structural analyses showed both types of subunits had blocked amino termini. Other properties of the isozymes and subunits, including immunological reactivity, pH stability, peptide mapping and amino acid composition, were also established.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Sun, An Qiang
Partner: UNT Libraries

Isolation and Partial Characterization of Lecithin Cholesterol Acyltransferase and High Density Lipoprotein from Hog Plasma

Description: Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was purified 30,000-fold from hog plasma in a homogeneous state as indicated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme had an apparent molecular weight of 66,000 and was found to contain about 21.4 percent (w/w) carbohydrate. The properties of hog LCAT including amino acid composition were compared with human LCAT. High density lipoprotein (HDL) was isolated from the hog plasma by an immunoaffinity column chromatography. The isolated HDL showed nearly identical lipid-protein composition although it contained additional protein components when it was compared to HDL isolated by a traditional method involving ultracentrifugation.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Park, Yong Bok
Partner: UNT Libraries

NAD+-Dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase from Swine Kidney: Characterization and Kinetic Mechanism

Description: Cytoplasmic 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase from swine kidney was purified to specific activity of 1.2 U per mg protein, by chromatographic techniques. Native molecular weight of enzyme was estimated at 45,000. Enzyme was inhibited by sulfhydryls, diuretics, and various fatty acids. Substrate studies indicated NAD+ specificity and ability to catabolize prostaglandins, except prostaglandin B and thromboxane B. Initial velocity studies gave intersecting plots conforming to a sequential mechanism. 15-keto-prostaglandin exhibited linear noncompetitive production inhibition with respect to either prostaglandin or NAD+; NAD yielded linear competitive production inhibition with respect to NADH. Results, and those of dead-end inhibition and alternated substrate studies, are consistent with an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism: NAD+ is added first, then prostaglandin; then 15-keto-rostaglandin is released, then NADH.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Kung-Chao, Diana T.-Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Isolation and Characterization of Two Enzyme Proteins Catalyzing Oxido-Reduction at C-9 and C-15 of Prostaglandins from Swine Kidney

Description: Two swine kidney proteins (PI 4.8 and 5.8) both possessing 9-prostaglandin ketoreductase (9-PGKR) and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) activities were purified to homogeneity. Purification increased specific activities in parallel. Molecular weight, subunit size, amino acid composition, coenzyme and substrate specificity and antigenicity of both proteins were similar. Gel filtration and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis molecular weights of 29,500 and 29,000, respectively, suggested a single subunit. Although a variety of prostaglandins served as substrates, the best for 15-PGDH was PGB, while PGA_1-GSH showed the lowest Km for 9-PGKR. Rabbit antibody against the PI 5.8 protein crossreacted with both purified renal enzymes and with extracts from rat spleen, lung, heart, aorta, and liver.
Date: December 1980
Creator: Chang, David Guey-Bin
Partner: UNT Libraries

pH Dependence of the Kinetic Parameters for the Oxalacetate Decarboxylation and Pyruvate Reduction Reactions Catalyzed by Malic Enzyme

Description: Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation of oxalacetate and reduction of pyruvate. Thus, the present classification (E.C. 1.1.1.39) for this enzyme should be changed to E.C. 1.1.1.38. In the absence of nucleotide, both the chicken liver NADP-malic enzyme and Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzymes catalyze the decarboxylation of oxalacetate. A study of the pH dependence of kinetic parameters for oxalacetate decarboxylation and pyruvate reduction was carried out for the NAD(P)-malic enzyme with Mg^2+ and Mn^2+ in the presence and absence of nucleotide. In all cases, an enzyme residue is required in its protonated form for reaction while for oxalacetate decarboxylation the β-carboxyl of oxalacetate is required unprotonated. Of a number of inhibitory binding analogs of malate tested, oxalate is the tightest binding inhibitor for Ascaris suum enzyme.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Park, Sang-Hoon
Partner: UNT Libraries

Denaturation, Renaturation and Other Structural Studies on Phosphoglucose Isomerases

Description: Structural properties of phosphoglucose isomerases isolated from a variety of species have been compared by peptide fingerprinting, predicted amino acid sequence homologies and by denaturation and renaturation studies. The enzymes are more readily denatured in guanidinium chloride than in urea, and the isomerase isolated from yeast is more stable toward acid pH than the rabbit muscle enzyme. The rates of guanidinium chloride-induced denaturation are markedly increased by ionic strength and decreased by substrates, competitive inhibitors or glycerol. The enzyme can be renatured, but only in the presence of glycerol. The renaturation process is dependent on protein concentration and temperature and provides a method for the formation of mixed species heterodimers.
Date: December 1975
Creator: Young, Clint D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Differences in Protein Constituents of Some Azotobacter Species

Description: This study used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to study the acid-phenol soluble proteins of five strains (A. vinelandii 12837, A. vinelandii 0, A. chroococcum 8004, A. macrocytogenes 8702, A. tumefaciens) of bacteria grown on Burk's nitrogen-free media, Trypticase Soy Broth, and 0.3% butanol medium. The results showed that the protein patterns can be used for the identification and possibly the taxonomic classification of the Azotobacter. The change of phenotype of the bacteria in different media followed the change of protein quantity and quality. There was no absolute similarity between any two of the species studied and this suggests a genetically heterogenous group of organisms while the amount of common proteins suggests close genetic relationships. Further studies are necessary to confirm the status of A. tumefaciens.
Date: August 1975
Creator: Hsu, Li-Chu Yao
Partner: UNT Libraries

Isolation and Characterization of Proteus vulgaris Methylglyoxal Synthetase

Description: Methylglyoxal synthetase, which catalyzes the formation of methylglyoxal and inorganic phosphate from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, was found in extracts of Proteus vulgaris. An efficient purification procedure utilizing ion exchange column chromatography and isoelectric focusing has been developed. Homogeneity of the enzyme preparation was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and rechromatography.Two components of methylglyoxal synthetase were obtained upon isoelectric focusing. A comparison of the chemical and physical properties of the two components was carried out. The enzyme is a dimer. In the presence of inorganic phosphate, the hyperbolic saturation kinetics with dihydroxyacetone phosphate are shifted to sigmoidal.
Date: May 1975
Creator: Tsai, Pei-Kuo
Partner: UNT Libraries

Site Directed Mutagenesis of Dienelactone Hydrolase

Description: The clcD gene encoding dienelactone hydrolase (DLH) is part of the clc gene cluster for the utilization of the B-ketoadipate pathway intermediate chlorocatechol. The roles that individual amino acids residues play in catalysis and binding of the enzyme were investigated. Using PCR a 1.9 kbp clcD fragment was amplified and subcloned yielding a 821 bp BamHi to ZscoRI subclone in the plasmid pUC19.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Al-Khatib, Haifa Yousef
Partner: UNT Libraries

Alternate Substrates and Isotope Effects as a Probe of the Malic Enzyme Reaction

Description: Dissociation constants for alternate dirmcleotide substrates and competitive inhibitors suggest that the dinucleotide binding site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme is hydrophobic in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Changes in the divalent metal ion activator from Mg^2+ to Mn^2+ or Cd^2+ results in a decrease in the dinucleotide affinity and an increase in the affinity for malate. Primary deuterium and 13-C isotope effects obtained with the different metal ions suggest either a change in the transition state structure for the hydride transfer or decarboxylation steps or both. Deuterium isotope effects are finite whether reactants are maintained at saturating or limiting concentrations with all the metal ions and dinucleotide substrates used. With Cd^2+ as the divalent metal ion, inactivation of the enzyme occurs whether enzyme alone is present or is turning over. Upon inactivation only Cd^2+ ions are bound to the enzyme which becomes denatured. Modification of the enzyme to give an SCN-enzyme decreases the ability of Cd^2+ to cause inactivation. The modified enzyme generally exhibits increases in K_NAD and K_i_metai and decreases in V_max as the metal size increases from Mg^2+ to Mn^2+ or Cd^2+, indicative of crowding in the site. In all cases, affinity for malate greatly decreases, suggesting that malate does not bind optimally to the modified enzyme. For the native enzyme, primary deuterium isotope effects increase with a concomitant decrease in the 13-C effects when NAD is replaced by an alternate dinucleotide substrate different in redox potential. This suggests that when the alternate dinucleotides are used, a switch in the rate limitation of the chemical steps occurs with hydride transfer more rate limiting than decarboxylation. Deuteration of malate decreases the 13-C effect with NAD for the native enzyme, but an increase in 13-C effect is obtained with alternate dinucleotides. These suggest the presence of a ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Gavva, Sandhya Reddy
Partner: UNT Libraries

Physical, Chemical and Catalytic Properties of the Isozymes of Bovine Glucose Phosphate Isomerase

Description: Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) occurs in different bovine tissues as multiple, catalytically active isozymes which can be resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. GPI from bovine heart was purified to homogeneity and each of the isozymes was resolved. Four of the five isozymes were characterized with regard to their physical, chemical and catalytic properties in order to establish their possible physiological significance and to ascertain their molecular basis. The isozymes exhibited identical native (118 Kd) and subunit (59 Kd) molecular weights but had different apparent pi values of 7.2, 7.0, 6.8 and 6.6. Structural analyses showed that the amino terminus was blocked and the carboxyl terminal sequence was -Glu-Ala-Ser-Gly for all four isozymes. The most basic isozyme was more stable than the more acidic isozymes (lower pi values) at pH extremes, at high ionic strength, in the presence of denaturants or upon exposure to proteases. Kinetic constants, such as turnover number, Km and Ki values, were identical for all isozymes. Identical amino acid composition and peptide mapping by chemical cleavage at methionine and cysteine residues of the isozymes suggest a postsynthetic modification rather then a genetic origin for the in vivo isozymes. When the most basic isozyme was incubated in vitro under mild alkaline conditions, there was a spontaneous generation of the more acidic isozymes with electrophoretic properties identical to those found in vivo. The simultaneous release in ammonia along with the spontaneous shift to more acidic isozymes and changes in the specific cleavage of the Asn-Gly bonds by hydroxylamine of the acidic isozyme indicates deamidation as the probable molecular basis. In summary the isozymes appear to be the result of spontaneous, postsynthetic modifications involving the addition of an equal number of negative charges and are consistent with the deamidation process.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Cini, John Kenneth
Partner: UNT Libraries

Regulation of Lactobacillic Acid Formation in Lactobacillus Plantarum

Description: Cyclopropanation of the unsaturated fatty acid moieties of membrane phospholipids is a commonly observed phenomenon in a number of bacterial systems. The cyclopropane fatty acids are usually synthesized during and after the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase, or under such environmental conditions as acidic culture pH, low oxygen tension or high salt concentrations. S-Adenosylmethionine, the ubiquitous methyl group donor, provides the methylene bridge carbon in the reaction catalyzed by cyclopropane fatty acid synthase. Also formed in the reaction is S-adenosylhomocysteine, a potent inhibitor of cyclopropane fatty acid synthase, which is degraded by S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase. This work provides evidence for at least two modes of regulation of lactobacillic acid synthesis, the cyclopropane fatty acid formed from cis-vaccenic acid (cis-11,12-octadecenoic acid), in Lactobacillus piantarum.
Date: December 1980
Creator: Smith, Darwin Dennis
Partner: UNT Libraries

Synthesis of Anthracyclines Related to Adriamycin

Description: This dissertation reports the preparation of several types of anthraquinones structurally related to adriamycin. It describes the synthesis of two types of 2-aminoquinizarin compounds. It also presents two new syntheses of a heterocyclic tetracyclic ring system, similar to the aglicone ring system of adriamycin. A series of 2-aminoquinizarins was prepared by adding several primary amines to quinizarin. Quinizarin was shown to be essentially inert toward secondary amines. Several secondary amine adducts with quinizarin have been prepared, however, by treating the bis-boroacetate ester of quinizarin with the amines. Both types of 2-aminoquinizarin compounds exhibit outstanding potential for possessing antineoplastic activity, and several have been submitted to the National Cancer Institute for testing in their screening program for antineoplastic agents.
Date: May 1981
Creator: White, Roger J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Poly(ADP-ribose) Synthesis as a Function of Growth and DNA Fragmentation

Description: This work examines the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) in normal and SV40-transformed monolayer cultures of 3T3 cells as a function of growth and DNA fragmentation. A review of the relevant literature is given in the introduction of this work. Poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been implicated in transcription, replication, repair, differentiation and regulation of cell growth. The results of this study suggest that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is involved in some aspect of cell-growth control and DNA repair.
Date: December 1981
Creator: Levi, Viktorya
Partner: UNT Libraries

Quantification of Poly(ADP-ribose) in Normal and in DNA-Damaged Cells

Description: This work presents the development of a new highly sensitive and selective chemical assay for poly(ADP-ribose) which is routinely useful for the determination of polymer levels in vivo. This method was used to carefully measure poly(ADP-ribose) levels in normal and in DNA-damaged cells. The results of these studies strongly suggest that synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) is involved in some aspect of DNA repair. A review of the literature is presented in the introduction of this work. Poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been implicated in aspects of transcription, in DNA syn thesis, and in DNA repair largely based on evidence from in vitro studies. It is apparent that current methodology has not allowed the routine quantification of poly(ADP-ribose) in vivo, hence the lack of i^n vivo data concerning the function(s) of the polymer. The body of this work presents the development of two chemical methods for the quantification of poly(ADP-ribose) and the application of one of these methods to the measurement of polymer levels in normal and DNA-damaged cells. Preliminary studies are presented on the utilization of combined gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy for the selective quantification of nucleoside derivatives. A second method makes use of the unique chemistry of the polymer for quantification. The polymer was selectively adsorbed to dihydroxyboryl-sepharose which allowed the removal of most RNA, DNA, and protein from the samples. The polymer was hydrolyzed to the unique nucleoside 2'—^-l*'-ribosyladenosine by digestion with venom phosphodiesterase and bacterial alkaline phosphatase. The 1-N^-etheno derivative of ribosyladenosine was formed by reaction with chloroacetaldehyde and this derivative was seperated from other fluorescent species by reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography.
Date: December 1980
Creator: Sims, James L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Fungal Antigens and Fungal Disease: An Alkali-Soluble, Water Soluble Antigen from Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioidomycosis

Description: Diagnostic medical mycology has been slow to advance due to a lack of species specific antigens in organisms which cause serious diseases in man. Toward this end, an HPLC analysis was done of the following fungal antigens: histoplasmins HKC-43 and H-42, blastomycin KCB-26, an alkali-soluble, water soluble antigen from Blastomyces dermatitidis (b-ASWS), a coccidioidin prepared from a toluene lysate of the mycelial-arthroconidia phase of Coccidioides immitis, and an alkali-soluble, water-soluble antigen from Coccidioides immitis (c-ASWS). The HPLC survey included size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), ion exchange chromatography (HPIEC), and reversephase chromatography (RP). Resolution was poor with both SEC and HPIEC but was excellent with RP chromatography. The use of RP will allow sufficient separation for further antigenic and structural analysis.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Fleming, William H. (William Harold)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Isolation and Characterization of Malic Enzyme from Ascaris suum

Description: A procedure for the isolation of malic enzyme from muscle tissue of the roundworm Ascaris suum is described. The fractionation method yields relatively large quantities of the enzyme,with a specific activity of fifteen moles of malate converted to pyruvate and carbon dioxide per min per mg at 25º. Homogeneity was established with analytical ultracentrifugation, zone electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and rechromatography. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 250,000, and it is dissociated under several conditions into four identical monomers of 64,000 daltons. The enzyme exists as a single electrophoretic form and prefers manganous and NAD over other cations and NADP. Ammonium sulfate competes with manganous for the active site and titration with DTNB yields eight thiol groups per mole. Titration of the first four thiol groups is accompanied by a complete loss in enzyme activity. Equilibrium dialysis, product inhibition, and initial velocity studies suggest a rapid-equilibrium random sequential mechanism for the Ascaris suum malic enzyme. The presence of 1.3 binding sites per subunits was determined for L-ma late. Antisera prepared against A. suum malic enzyme reacted to a small extent with the NAD malic enzymes from two free-living nematodes, Panarellus redivivus and Turbatrix aceti. A correlation coefficient of 0.911 was obtained upon comparing the amino acid composition of A. suum and E. coli malic enzymes. Some sequence homology is predicted between these malic enzymes. The physiological interpretation favors the binding of malate initially, with the subsequent addition of NAD to the enzyme.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Fodge, Douglas W.
Partner: UNT Libraries