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Advanced millimeter wave chemical sensor.

Description: This paper discusses the development of an advanced millimeter-wave (mm-wave) chemical sensor and its applications for environmental monitoring and arms control treaty verification. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of fingerprint-type molecular rotational signatures in the mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave spectrum to sense airborne chemicals. The mm-wave sensor, operating in the frequency range of 220-300 GHz, can work under all weather conditions and in smoky and dusty environments. The basic configuration of the mm-wave sensor is a monostatic swept-frequency radar consisting of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer or Schottky barrier detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 220-350 GHz. Using the Russian BWO tube, a mm-wave radar system was built and field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. The mm-wave system detected chemical plumes very well; the detection sensitivity for polar molecules like methyl chloride was down to a concentration of 12 ppm.
Date: March 24, 1999
Creator: Gopalsami, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Millimeter-wave imaging of thermal and chemical signatures.

Description: Development of a passive millimeter-wave (mm-wave) system is described for remotely mapping thermal and chemical signatures of process effluents with application to arms control and nonproliferation. Because a large amount of heat is usually dissipated in the air or waterway as a by-product of most weapons of mass destruction facilities, remote thermal mapping may be used to detect concealed or open facilities of weapons of mass destruction. We have developed a focal-plane mm-wave imaging system to investigate the potential of thermal mapping. Results of mm-wave images obtained with a 160-GHz radiometer system are presented for different target scenes simulated in the laboratory. Chemical and nuclear facilities may be identified by remotely measuring molecular signatures of airborne molecules emitted from these facilities. We have developed a filterbank radiometer to investigate the potential of passive spectral measurements. Proof of principle is presented by measuring the HDO spectral line at 80.6 GHz with a 4-channel 77-83 GHz radiometer.
Date: March 30, 1999
Creator: Gopalsami, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Remote detection of chemicals by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

Description: This paper discusses the development and field testing of a remote chemical detection system that is based on millimeter-wave (mm-wave) spectroscopy. The mm-wave system is a monostatic swept-frequency radar that consists of a mm-wave sweeper, a hot-electron-bolometer detector, and a trihedral reflector. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/detector and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring the swept-frequency radar return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. The problem of pressure broadening, which hampered open-path spectroscopy in the past, has been mitigated in this work by designing a fast sweeping source over a broad frequency range. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that can be tuned over 225--315 GHz. A mm-wave sweeper that includes the BWO tube was built to sweep the entire frequency range within 10 ms. The radar system was field-tested at the DOE Nevada Test Site at a standoff distance of 60 m. Methyl chloride was released from a wind tunnel that produced a 2-m diameter plume at its exit point. The mm-wave system detected methyl chloride plumes down to a concentration of 12 ppm. The measurement results agree well with model-fitted data. Remote or standoff sensing of airborne chemicals is gaining importance for arms control and treaty verification, intelligence collection, and environmental monitoring.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Gopalsami, N. & Raptis, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical decomposition by normalization of millimeter-wave spectra

Description: The sharp, distinct absorption spectra of chemicals at low pressures in the mm wave range become broadened at high pressures, so that detecting and quantifying different chemicals at high pressures become difficult. This paper proposes a method of decomposition based on the low pressure spectra. Normalized low pressure spectral amplitudes are used as features to train a neural network. The network is tested using the peak spectra obtained for an unknown plume of chemicals at high pressure. Initial tests conducted on simulated and experimental spectra of selected chemicals show that the decomposition results of the proposed method are dependent on the dominance of the chemicals in the mixture - a characteristic common to conventional methods of decomposition.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Gopalan, K. & Gopalsami, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

Description: The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure β- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Barnowski, R.; Chien; H. & Gopalsami, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determining bonding quality in polymer composites with a millimeter wave sensor

Description: Microwave nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques offer alternative solutions to other conventional NDT methods. Microwave/millimeter wave (determined roughly to cover 0.3 to 300 GHz) techniques are particularly useful for examination of dielectric composite materials that their low dielectric losses provide good depth of penetration of electromagnetic radiation in this band. Limitations associated with conventional NDT techniques such as high frequency ultrasonic testing (UT), namely, large variations in elastic properties of low density composite materials cause interpretation of complex UT signals difficult. Further, criticality of coupling of transducer to the sample surface limits the use of such techniques for on-line applications. High frequency microwave (millimeter waves, 30--300 GHz) systems compared to their low frequency counterparts offer higher resolution and sensitivity to variations in dielectric properties of low-loss composites. Further, higher frequencies render utilization of more compact systems which are often important for practical applications. A millimeter wave sensor is described in this work which can be utilized for non-contact NDT of a wide range of thin-sheet dielectric composite materials either as a laboratory-based instrument or for on-line quality control applications. Experimental results are presented on noncontact measurement of bonding quality in polyethylene/carbon composite samples. The w-band monostatic sensor operates based on measurement of the reflection properties of the material under test, which are then used to determine the volumetric uniformity of the joint area. Preliminary experimental results indicate the potential for the use of this sensor in fabrication process control of low-loss dielectric composite materials.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Bakhtiari, S.; Gopalsami, N. & Raptis, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Near-field millimeter - wave imaging of nonmetallic materials

Description: A near-field millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging system has been designed and built in the 94-GHz range for on-line inspection of nonmetallic (dielectric) materials. The imaging system consists of a transceiver block coupled to an antenna that scans the material to be imaged; a reflector plate is placed behind the material. A quadrature IF mixer in the transceiver block enables measurement of in-phase and quadrature-phase components of reflected signals with respect to the transmitted signal. All transceiver components, with the exception of the Gunn-diode oscillator and antenna, were fabricated in uniform blocks and integrated and packaged into a compact unit (12.7 x 10.2 x 2.5 cm). The objective of this work is to test the applicability of a near-field compact mm-wave sensor for on-line inspection of sheetlike materials such as paper, fabrics, and plastics. This paper presents initial near-field mm-wave images of paper and fabric samples containing known artifacts.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S. & Raptis, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Open-path millimeter-wave spectroscopy in the 225--315 GHz range

Description: This paper discusses the development of an open-path millimeter-wave (mm-wave) spectroscopy system in the 225--315 GHz atmospheric window. The new system is primarily a monostatic swept-frequency radar consisting of a mm-wave sweeper, hot-electron-bolometer or Schottky detector, and trihedral reflector. The heart of the system is a Russian backward-wave oscillator (BWO) tube that is tunable over 225--350 GHz. A mm-wave sweeper has been built with the BWO tube to sweep the entire frequency range within 1 s. The chemical plume to be detected is situated between the transmitter/receiver and the reflector. Millimeter-wave absorption spectra of chemicals in the plume are determined by measuring swept-frequency radar signals with and without the plume in the beam path. Because of power supply noise and thermal instabilities within the BWO structure over time, the BWO frequencies fluctuate between sweeps and thus cause errors in baseline subtraction. To reduce this frequency-jitter problem, a quasi-optical Fabry-Perot cavity is used in conjunction with the radar for on-line calibration of sweep traces, allowing excellent baseline subtraction and signal averaging. Initial results of the new system are given for open-path detection of chemicals.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S. & Raptis, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An application of wavelet transforms and neural networks for decomposition of millimeter-wave spectroscopic signals

Description: This paper reports on wavelet-based decomposition methods and neural networks for remote monitoring of airborne chemicals using millimeter wave spectroscopy. Because of instrumentation noise and the presence of untargeted chemicals, direct decomposition of the spectra requires a large number of training data and yields low accuracy. A neural network trained with features obtained from a discrete wavelet transform is demonstrated to have better decomposition with faster training time. Results based on simulated and experimental spectra are presented to show the efficacy of the wavelet-based methods.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Gopalan, K.; Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S. & Raptis, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of NMR spectroscopy and multidimensional imaging to the gelcasting process and in-situ real-time monitoring of cross-linking polyacrylamide gels

Description: In the gelcasting process, a slurry of ceramic powder in a solution of organic monomers is cast in a mold. The process is different from injection molding in that it separates mold-filling from setting during conversion of the ceramic slurry to a formed green part. In this work, NMR spectroscopy and imaging have been conducted for in-situ monitoring of the gelation process and for mapping the polymerization. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been obtained during polymerization of a premix of soluble reactive methacrylamide (monomer) and N, N`-methylene bisacrylamide (cross-linking molecules). The premix was polymerized by adding ammonium persulfate (initiator) and tetramethyl-ethylene-diamine (accelerator) to form long-chain, cross-linked polymers. The time-varying spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} during polymerization have been studied at 25 and 35{degrees}C, and the variation of spectra and T{sub 1} with respect to extent of polymerization has been determined. To verify homogeneous polymerization, multidimensional NMR imaging was utilized for in-situ monitoring of the process. The intensities from the images are modeled and the correspondence shows a direct extraction of T{sub 1} data from the images.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Ahuja, S.; Dieckman, S.L. & Gopalsami, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a millimeter-wave sensor for environmental monitoring

Description: A millimeter-wave (mm-wave) sensor in the frequency range of 225-315 GHz is being developed for continuous emission monitoring of airborne effluents from industrial sites for environmental compliance monitoring and process control. Detection of chemical species is based on measuring the molecular rotational energy transitions at mm-wave frequencies. The mm-wave technique offers better transmission properties compared to optics in harsh industrial environments with smoke, dust, aerosols, and steam, as well as in adverse atmospheric conditions. The laboratory measurements indicate that polar molecules can be measured with a sensitivity of tens of parts-per-million-meter using this technology. Proof of principle of the open-path system was tested by releasing and detecting innocuous chemicals in the open air. It uses a monostatic radar configuration with transmitter and receiver on one side and a comer cube on tire other side of the plume to be measured. A wide-band swept frequency mm-wave signal is transmitted through the plume and return signal from the comer cube is detected by a hot-electron-bolometer. Absorption spectra of plume gases are measured by comparing the return signals with and without the plume in the beam path. Using signal processing based on deconvolution, high specificity of detection has been shown for resolving individual chemicals from a mixture. This technology is applicable for real-time measurement of a suite of airborne gases/vapors emitted from vents and stacks of process industries. A prototype sensor is being developed for wide-area monitoring of industrial sites and in-place monitoring of stack gases.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S. & Raptis, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NMR imaging: A chemical' microscope for coal analysis

Description: This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique for spatially mapping proton distributions in whole coals and solvent-swollen coal samples. The technique is based on a 3-D back-projection protocol for data acquisition, and a reconstruction technique based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. In principle, the 3-D methodology provides higher spatial resolution of solid materials than is possible with conventional slice-selection protocols. The applicability of 3-D NMR imaging has been demonstrated by mapping the maceral phases in Utah Blind Canyon (APCS {number sign}6) coal and the distribution of mobile phases in Utah coal swollen with deuterated and protic pyridine. 7 refs., 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: French, D.C.; Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N. & Botto, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid-state NMR imaging system

Description: An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L. & Ellingson, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-resolution millimeter-wave imaging system for defect characterization in dielectric slabs

Description: Preliminary results are presented for a millimeter-wavelength free-space imaging system used to detect and characterize defects in layered dielectric composite slabs. Such systems throughout the microwave spectrum have shown great potential as alternative nondestructive evaluation tools for on-line, in-situ examination of low-loss dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics, and various dielectric composites. Results of a fixed-frequency W-band imaging system operating in either through-transmission or reflection mode are presented here. Incorporation of focused-beam antennas allows high-resolution measurement of small variations within the sample under test. The results are based on measurement of the relative amplitude and phase of the reflected or transmitted wave in monostatic or bistatic configurations, respectively. With proper calibration, the measured parameters can be used to estimate dielectric property variations within the material media. A theoretical simulation for plane wave propagation in a multilayered media is used to interpret the measurement results.
Date: August 1, 1994
Creator: Bakhtiari, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C. & Lepper, M. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid-state NMR imaging system

Description: An accessory for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.
Date: December 31, 1990
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S. L. & Ellingson, W. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microwave radar detection of gas pipeline leaks.

Description: We are developing a microwave radar sensing and imaging system to detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. The underlying detection principle is radar backscattering from the index-of-refraction inhomogeneities introduced by the dispersion of methane in air. An essential first step in the development effort is modeling to estimate the radar cross section. This paper describes the modeling results and the experimental efforts underway to validate the model. For the case of leaks from small holes in a pressurized gas pipeline, we modeled the gas dynamics of the leak jet to determine the plume geometry and the variation of methane concentration in air as a function of distance from the leak source. From the static and dynamic changes in the index of refraction in the turbulent plume, the radar backscatter cross sections were calculated. The results show that the radar cross sections of the leak plumes should be detectable by special-purpose radars.
Date: October 2, 2002
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Kanareykin, D. B.; Asanov, V. D; Bakhtiari, S. & Raptis, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Sensor Technologies for Next-Generation Vehicles

Description: This report summarizes the development of automobile emissions sensors at Argonne National Laboratory. Three types of sensor technologies, i.e., ultrasound, microwave, and ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS), were evaluated for engine-out emissions monitoring. Two acoustic sensor technologies, i.e., surface acoustic wave and flexural plate wave, were evaluated for detection of hydrocarbons. The microwave technique involves a cavity design and measures the shifts in resonance frequency that are a result of the presence of trace organic compounds. The IMS technique was chosen for further development into a practical emissions sensor. An IMS sensor with a radioactive {sup 63}Ni ion source was initially developed and applied to measurement of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} emissions. For practical applications, corona and spark discharge ion sources were later developed and applied to NO{sub x} emission measurement. The concentrations of NO{sub 2} in dry nitrogen and in a typical exhaust gas mixture are presented. The sensor response to moisture was evaluated, and a cooling method to control the moisture content in the gas stream was examined. Results show that the moisture effect can be reduced by using a thermoelectric cold plate. The design and performance of a laboratory prototype sensor are described.
Date: January 30, 2002
Creator: Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Gopalsami, N.; Jendrzejczyk, A. & Raptis, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waveguide-based ultrasonic and far-field electromagnetic sensors for downhole reservoir characterization.

Description: This report summarizes the first year research and development effort leading to development of high-temperature sensors for enhanced geothermal systems. It covers evaluation of ultrasonic and electromagnetic (EM) techniques applied to temperature measurement and flow characterization. On temperature measurement, we have evaluated both microwave radiometry and ultrasonic techniques for temperature gradient and profile measurements. Different antenna designs are evaluated and array loop antenna design is selected for further development. We have also evaluated ultrasonic techniques for total flow characterization, which includes using speed of sound to determine flow temperature, measuring acoustic impedance to estimate fluid density, and using cross-correlation technique to determine the mass flow rate. Method to estimate the flow enthalpy is briefly discussed. At end, the need and proposed techniques to characterize the porosity and permeability of a hot dry rock resource are presented.
Date: November 12, 2010
Creator: Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Wang, K.; Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NMR spectroscopy and imaging of macerals in Argonne premium coals

Description: Macerals that have been separated from two high-volatile bituminous coals from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Program are surveyed using chemical and NMR spectroscopic techniques. Quantitative aspects of the method are discussed. Alkylation using {sup 13}C enriched methyl iodide followed by solid {sup 13}C NMR analysis was used to determine the concentrations of acidic OH and CH sites in these macerals. Also, the first successful application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for spatially mapping chemically distinct regions within a Utah coal has been demonstrated. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Botto, R.E.; Choi, C.Y.; Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Thompson, A.R. & Tsiao, C.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic continuous casting project: Final report

Description: This report describes the work on development of an electromagnetic casting process for steel, which was carried out at Argonne National Laboratory between January 1985 and December 1987. This effort was concerned principally with analysis and design work on magnet technology, liquid metal feed system, coolant system, and sensors and process controllers. Experimentation primarily involved (1) electromagnetic studies to determine the conditions and controlling parameters for stable levitation and (2) feed-system studies to establish important parameters that control and influence fluid flow from the liquid metal source to the caster. 73 refs., 91 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1988
Creator: Battles, J.E.; Rote, D.M.; Misra, B.; Praeg, W.F.; Hull, J.R.; Turner, L.R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of green-state ceramics

Description: Objective is the development of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques and technology applicable to the nondestructive characterization of green-state ceramics. To this end, a three-dimensional (3-D) NMR imaging technique has been developed, based on a back-projection acquisition protocol in combination with image reconstruction techniques that are based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. The method incorporates the experimental flexibility to overcome many of the difficulties associated with imaging of solid and semisolid broad-line materials, and also provides contiguously sampled data in three dimensions. This technique has been evaluated as a nondestructive characterizauon method for determining the spatial distribution of organic additves in green-state injection-molded cylindrical Si{sub 3}N{sup 4} tensile specimens. The technique has been evaluated on the basis of providing moderate image resolution over large sample volumes, high resolution over smaller specimen volumes, and sensitivity to variations in the concentration of organics. Resolution of 200{mu}m has been obtained with excellent sensitivity to concentration. A detailed account of the 3-D imaging results obtained from the study, a discussion of the difficulties and limitations of the imaging technique, and suggestions for technique and system improvements are included.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Dieckman, S. L.; Gopalsami, N.; Ford, J. M.; Raptis, A. C.; Ellingson, W. A.; Rizo, P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection sensitivity of x-ray CT imaging for NDE of green-state ceramics

Description: Improved ceramic-processing methods that use pressure slip-casting and injection molding are being developed at Norton Advanced Ceramics, with a goal of producing reliable structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of ceramic parts at different stages of processing can provide useful diagnostic information to help improve processing techniques. For example, an evaluation of density gradients in as-cast green-body samples can be used to judge mold performance and make changes in mold design. Also, the ability to detect minute flaws (20 to 50 {mu}m), such as agglomerates, inclusions, and voids, in green-body, presintered, and densified parts is important in ensuring structural reliability of the final parts, because these flaws, above certain critical sizes, can lead to catastrophic failure. Three-dimensional microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for application to quantitative NDE evaluation of ceramics. This paper evaluates the detection sensitivity of the ANL X-ray CT system when used to determine density gradients, inclusions, and voids in green-state Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics. A theoretical account of key system- and sample-related parameters affecting X-ray CT detection sensitivity is given, and results of experimental evaluation are presented. Density calibration phantoms and net-shape-formed tensile rods with seeded defects were used in the experimental evaluation of detection limits. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Gopalsami, N.; Rizo, P.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)) & Tracey, D.M. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program

Description: The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department