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Corrosion testing of spent nuclear fuel performed at Argonne National Laboratory for repository acceptance

Description: Corrosion tests of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel are performed at Argonne National Laboratory to support the license application for the Yucca Mountain Repository. The tests are designed to determine corrosion rates and degradation products formed when fuel is reacted at elevated temperature in different aqueous environments, including vapor, dripping water, submersion, and liquid film contact. Corrosion rates are determined from the quantity of radionuclides released from wetted fuel and from the weight loss of the test fuel specimen as a function of time. Degradation products include secondary mineral phases and dissolved, adsorbed, and colloidal species. Solid phase examinations determine fuel/mineral interface relationships, characterize radionuclide incorporation into secondary phases, and determine corrosion mechanisms at grain interfaces within the fuel. Leachate solution analyses quantify released radionuclides and determine the size and charge distribution of colloids. This paper presents selected results from corrosion tests on metallic fuels.
Date: July 20, 2000
Creator: Goldberg, M. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Validation and assessment of the RESPONS model

Description: A critical validation and assessment has been performed on the ''Regional Energy System for the Planning and Optimization of National Scenarios'' (RESPONS) model for ERDA/AFE. The objectives of the study were to determine the utility and quality of the model and data base, as published by the model developer, and evaluate the applicability of the model and data to relevant policy concerns. The model structure was examined, and constraints and assumptions were identified. Runs were performed to test the sensitivity of the model results to data input and implicit and explicit assumptions. The tables contained in the data base were examined as to methods for generation, sources of information, assumptions used, algorithms develped, quality limitations, and ease of modification. A few data areas were explored in detail. Conclusions pertinent to the objectives of the study were summarized, and recommendations as to possible modifications to the model and data base which would enhance model applicability and performance were provided.
Date: December 1, 1976
Creator: Goldberg, M. D. & Cherniavsky, E. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

Description: This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Tegen, S.; Milligan, M. & Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint

Description: In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.
Date: June 1, 2006
Creator: Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M. & Milligan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

Description: The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.
Date: October 2013
Creator: Goldberg, M. & Keyser, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

Description: The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.
Date: April 1, 2011
Creator: Goldberg, M. & Previsic, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts from Wind Power in the Western Governors' Association States (Poster)

Description: The Western Governors' Association created the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Committee (CDEAC) "to utilize the region's diverse resources to produce affordable, sustainable, and environmentally reponsible energy." This conference poster, prepared for WINDPOWER 2007 in Los Angeles, outlines the economic impact to the Western United States from new wind energy projects.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M. & Milligan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operation of a high-P/sub T/ spectrometer arm at 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ with particle identification

Description: In the Proceedings of the 1978 Isabelle Summer Study a high-pT spectrometer pair is presented as a prototype high-luminosity experiment. We consider here an updated version of this apparatus with the following questions in mind: (1) what rate capabilities are required to cope with L = 10/sup 33/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/; (2) what segmentation is needed to deal with the particle densities expected in high pT jets; and (3) is the resulting device within the reach of present technology. The current version of the device and the expected rates are presented, and the rates and segmentation of the components are discussed. The results of calculations related to event pile-up and triggering are presented. The main conclusion, that particle identification appears to be quite feasible at these rates, is discussed in detail. (WHK)
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Aronson, S.; Goldberg, M.; Holder, M. & Loh, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion of breached aluminide fuel under potential repository conditions.

Description: Permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel is proposed in a repository located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and it is the responsibility of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to provide the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) with information related to the release of fission products from the DOE-owned SNF resulting from SNF corrosion. Hydrologically unsaturated spent fuel tests (''drip'' tests) are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under potential exposure conditions in the repository. Of the priority fuels being tested under the NSNFP, the aluminum-based fuels are included because of their high relative volume and uranium enrichment. The Al fuel structure is composed of fissile and aluminum powders pressed and annealed between Al plates to form thin metallic plates. The most widely used fissile powder was the intermetallic compound aluminide UAl{sub x} (where x=2,3,4). As part of this testing program, preliminary corrosion tests using unirradiated UAl{sub x} were initiated to address experimental design, sampling, and analysis issues prior to conducting tests with spent fuels. However, during this program the decision was made by U.S. DOE to convert the aluminum-based fuels to safer enrichment levels by using the melt-dilute process at Savannah River. Nonetheless, the product ingot of the melt-dilute process resembles low enriched UAl{sub x} fuel and corrosion of the fuel is expected to be similar. This paper summarizes the preliminary testing results for the first year of the program and compares them to other corrosion testing results on aluminum fuels as well as other DOE fuel types.
Date: November 6, 2000
Creator: Kaminski, M. D. & Goldberg, M. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical considerations in materials management policy development

Description: Under the Materials-in-Inventory (MIN) initiative, US DOE intends to develop policies to ensure that materials are managed and use efficiently, cost-effectively, and safely throughout DOE. The MIN initiative covers depleted uranium, scrap metals, chemicals, explosives, spent nuclear fuel, lead, alkali metals, etc.; by far the largest component is depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). A technically defensible approach has been developed and is being used to select a long-term management strategy for DOE`s DUF6 inventory. The same approach can be adapted to management of other materials in inventory that have the potential to be reutilized.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Avci, H. & Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preparing the database for future CP violation measurements with B-mesons at e/sup +/e/sup -/ machines

Description: We consider the contribution of e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// machines to the measurement of CP violation in the B systems. Energy regions from the GAMMA(4S) to the Z/degree/ are considered, problems and prospects at each energy are reviewed.
Date: April 7, 1988
Creator: Byers, N.; Foley, K.; Goldberg, M.; Mistry, N & Shipsey, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.
Date: March 1, 2004
Creator: Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M. & Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Data needs for energy policy assessment

Description: The purpose of the paper is to describe a set of unfulfilled needs for data collection and evaluation for energy policy in the area of energy conservation. Models must be developed that describe the consumption patterns of individuals, households, business firms, and industries. To support such models, detailed high-quality data are needed so that meaningful analyses of present and changing energy consumption patterns can be carried out. In the U.S., such data are generally nonexistent or are not available in a form useful for energy policy models. In recognition of the unavailability of needed data in the U.S., for example, the National Academy of Sciences has undertaken a study, funded by the Federal Energy Administration, to determine data needs and data development regarding energy consumption and demands. The results of this study should provide a framework within which detailed work can proceed. Another area of data collection pertinent to energy conservation considerations is that of materials. The extraction, processing, fabrication, distribution, and usage of materials require a substantial fraction of the energy used each year in most industrialized countries. Improvements in the efficient use of energy in the various processes involved in materials production offer a source of considerable energy savings, as does the substitution of less energy-intensive materials for more energy intensive ones. A framework has been proposed within which materials-related options and tradeoffs can be considered. The approach closely patterns that of the BNL Reference Energy System and is called the Reference Material System. (MCW)
Date: June 1, 1976
Creator: Goldberg, M D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

Description: The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Johnson, C.; Augustine, C. & Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program

Description: This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.
Date: April 1, 2012
Creator: Steinberg, D.; Porro, G. & Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

Description: The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.
Date: December 31, 2013
Creator: Goldberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

Description: The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.
Date: June 1, 2013
Creator: Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M. & Keyser, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride

Description: One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Goldberg, M.; Avci, H.I. & Bradley, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of uranium corrosion product colloids by dynamic light scattering.

Description: The Department of Energy plans to dispose of approximately 2100 metric tons of spent metallic uranium fuel in the mined repository at Yucca Mountain. Laboratory studies at Argonne National Laboratory have shown that corrosion of metallic uranium fuel with groundwater generates significant quantities of stable colloids. This finding is considered very important in light of the recent report (1) of rapid subsurface transport of radionuclides at the Nevada Test Site via colloids. Thus, sparingly soluble radionuclides can be transported with the colloids through the subsurface aqueous environment to much greater distances than is predicted based on the aqueous volubility of the radionuclides alone. Accordingly, characterization of colloids generated by fuel corrosion is necessary for assessing the long-term fate and transport of radionuclides in the repository environment.
Date: November 16, 2000
Creator: Mertz, C.; Bowers, D.; Goldberg, M. & Shelton-Davis, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

{sup 129}I release fractions in unsaturated tests with fast-flux MOX fuels.

Description: Three types of unsaturated corrosion tests, high-drip, low-drip, and vapor, were initiated with two fast-flux MOX fuels, which had undergone extensive grain restructuring during irradiation in EBR-II. With these restructured fuel samples, release of {sup 129}I should have been maximized. Most of the {sup 129}I that was released during the first year of reaction was attributed to the release of {sup 129}I that had diffused to the grain boundaries of these extensively restructured fuels.
Date: November 2, 2000
Creator: Finn, P. A.; Tsai, Y.; Goldberg, M. M. & Strain, R. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

Description: The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.
Date: July 20, 2000
Creator: Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M. & Shelton-Davis, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characteristics of aqueous colloids generated by corrosion of metallic uranium fuel.

Description: Metallic uranium fuel from the Hanford N Reactor was corroded in aqueous solutions and the resulting colloidal suspensions were analyzed to determine particle size, morphology, population, and radionuclide association. The experiments used a range of solution chemistry conditions including deionized water, single salt solutions, and modified groundwater from Yucca Mountain. Colloids were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, and synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering. The results of these analyses indicate that stable suspensions of small (1-10 nm diameter), spherical uranium oxides are generated and aggregate to approximately 100-200 nm colloids. There is no indication that these colloids continue to aggregate to larger size. In silicate solutions, large acicular uranium silicate colloids are formed in small quantities as are large uranium-bearing smectite clay colloids. Plutonium clearly associates with colloidal particles. Large particles contain the same Pu/U ratio as the uncorroded fuel, possibly indicating that the Pu is incorporated in the particle matrix. Smaller particles are highly enriched in Pu relative to the uncorroded fuel.
Date: September 12, 2002
Creator: Fortner, J. A.; Mertz, C. J.; Goldberg, M. M. & Siefert, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electron pairs production at the ISR. [Cross sections, up to. sqrt. s = 63 GeV center of mass]

Description: The cross section for J/psi and ..gamma.. production in proton--proton collisions was measured at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings for center-of-mass energies up to ..sqrt..s = 63 GeV. Electrons were identified using lithium foil transition radiators and liquid argon calorimeters, which also measure their energy. Results are reported as a function of ..sqrt..s and P/sub perpendicular/. In addition to the J/psi and ..gamma.. they cover the production of electron pairs with invariant masses from 6 to 8.7 GeV. 10 references.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Cnops, A M; Fabjan, C W & Goldberg, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department