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Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between Magnesium and Aluminum Alloys

Description: Joining two dissimilar metals, specifically Mg and Al alloys, using conventional welding techniques is extraordinarily challenging. Even when these alloys are able to be joined, the weld is littered with defects such as cracks, cavities, and wormholes. The focus of this project was to use friction stir welding to create a defect-free joint between Al 2139 and Mg WE43. The stir tool used in this project, made of H13 tool steel, is of fixed design. The design included an 11 mm scrolled and concave shoulder in addition to a 6 mm length pin comprised of two tapering, threaded re-entrant flutes that promoted and amplified material flow. Upon completion of this project an improved experimental setup process was created as well as successful welds between the two alloys. These successful joints, albeit containing defects, lead to the conclusion that the tool used in project was ill fit to join the Al and Mg alloy plates. This was primarily due to its conical shaped pin instead of the more traditional cylindrical shaped pins. As a result of this aggressive pin design, there was a lack of heat generation towards the bottom of the pin even at higher (800-1000 rpm) rotation speeds. This lack of heat generation prohibited the material from reaching plastic deformation thus preventing the needed material flow to form the defect free joint.
Date: December 2016
Creator: Reese, Gregory A
Partner: UNT Libraries

Modeling of Fracture Toughness of Magnesium Alloy WE43 Before and After Friction Stir Processing

Description: Magnesium alloys are a popular research topic for structural applications because they have a lower density than conventional structural materials, including steel, titanium, and aluminum; however, the reliability and safety of their mechanical properties must be further proven. An important mechanical property for this purpose is fracture toughness, which is the measure of the material's resistance to crack propagation. In this study, a model of an experiment to investigate the fracture toughness of a magnesium alloy WE43 before and after friction stir processing (FSP) is developed, and the results are compared to those produced by a digital image correlation (DIC) system during an experiment from another paper. The model results of the material before FSP matched well with the DIC results, but the model of the material after FSP only partially matches the DIC results. In addition, a theoretical approach to calculating the standard fracture toughness value, KIc, from the modeling results is proposed, and is found to be a conservative approach.
Date: December 2016
Creator: Lipscomb, Celena Andrea
Partner: UNT Libraries

Dissimilar Joining of Al (AA2139) – Mg (WE43) Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding

Description: This research demonstrates the use of friction stir welding (FSW) to join dissimilar (Al-Mg) metal alloys. The main challenges in joining different, dissimilar metal alloys is the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in the stir zone affecting mechanical properties of joint significantly. In this present study, FSW joining process is used to join aluminum alloy AA2139 and magnesium alloy WE43. The 9.5 mm thick plates of AA2139 and WE43 were friction stir butt welded. Different processing parameters were used to optimize processing parameters. Also, various weldings showed a crack at interface due to formation of IMCs caused by liquation during FSW. A good strength sound weld was obtained using processing parameter of 1200 rev/min rotational speed; 76.2 mm/min traverse speed; 1.5 degree tilt and 0.13 mm offsets towards aluminum. The crack faded away as the tool was offset towards advancing side aluminum. Mostly, the research was focused on developing high strength joint through microstructural control to reduce IMCs thickness in Al-Mg dissimilar weld joint with optimized processing parameter and appropriate tool offset.
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Date: December 2016
Creator: Poudel, Amir
Partner: UNT Libraries

Study of Metal Whiskers Growth and Mitigation Technique Using Additive Manufacturing

Description: For years, the alloy of choice for electroplating electronic components has been tin-lead (Sn-Pb) alloy. However, the legislation established in Europe on July 1, 2006, required significant lead (Pb) content reductions from electronic hardware due to its toxic nature. A popular alternative for coating electronic components is pure tin (Sn). However, pure tin has the tendency to spontaneously grow electrically conductive Sn whisker during storage. Sn whisker is usually a pure single crystal tin with filament or hair-like structures grown directly from the electroplated surfaces. Sn whisker is highly conductive, and can cause short circuits in electronic components, which is a very significant reliability problem. The damages caused by Sn whisker growth are reported in very critical applications such as aircraft, spacecraft, satellites, and military weapons systems. They are also naturally very strong and are believed to grow from compressive stresses developed in the Sn coating during deposition or over time. The new directive, even though environmentally friendly, has placed all lead-free electronic devices at risk because of whisker growth in pure tin. Additionally, interest has occurred about studying the nature of other metal whiskers such as zinc (Zn) whiskers and comparing their behavior to that of Sn whiskers. Zn whiskers can be found in flooring of data centers which can get inside electronic systems during equipment reorganization and movement and can also cause systems failure.Even though the topic of metal whiskers as reliability failure has been around for several decades to date, there is no successful method that can eliminate their growth. This thesis will give further insights towards the nature and behavior of Sn and Zn whiskers growth, and recommend a novel manufacturing technique that has potential to mitigate metal whiskers growth and extend life of many electronic devices.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Gullapalli, Vikranth
Partner: UNT Libraries

Study of Mechanical Performance of Stent Implants Using Theoretical and Numerical Approach

Description: The coronary heart disease kills more than 350,000 persons/year and it costs $108.9 billion for the United States each year, in spite of significant advancements in clinical care and education for public, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are leading cause of death and disability to the nation. A cardiovascular disease involves mainly heart or blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) or both, and then mainly occurs in selected regions and affects heart, brain, kidney and peripheral arteries. As a surgical interventions, stent implantation is deployed to cure or ameliorate the disease. However, the high failure rate of stents used in patients with peripheral artery diseases has lead researchers to give special attention towards analyzing stent structure and characteristics. In this research, the mechanical properties of a stent based on the rhombus structure were analyzed and verified by means of analytical and numerical approaches. Theoretical model based on the beam theory were developed and numerical models were used to analyze the response of these structures under various and complex loading conditions. Moreover, the analysis of the stent inflation involves a model with large deformations and large strains, nonlinear material properties need to be considered to accurately capture the deformation process. The maximum stress values were found to occur in localized regions of the stent. These regions were generally found along the inner radii of each of the connected links connecting each of the longitudinal struts. Stress values throughout the whole stent were typically much lower. The peak engineering stress values were found to be less than the material ultimate strength (limit stress 515Mpa), indicating a safe stent design throughout expansion range. Lastly, the rheological behavior of blood can be quantified by non-Newtonian viscosity. Carreau model is introduced and simulates the situation in the artery, then the available shear stress in the model would ...
Date: August 2015
Creator: Yang, Hua
Partner: UNT Libraries

Feasibility Study of Consolidation by Direct Compaction and Friction Stir Processing of Commercially Pure Titanium Powder

Description: Commercially pure titanium can take up to six months to successfully manufacture a six-inch in diameter ingot in which can be shipped to be melted and shaped into other useful components. The applications to the corrosion-resistant, light weight, strong metal are endless, yet so is the manufacturing processing time. At a cost of around $80 per pound of certain grades of titanium powder, the everyday consumer cannot afford to use titanium in the many ways it is beneficial simply because the number of processing steps it takes to manufacture consumes too much time, energy, and labor. In this research, the steps it takes from the raw powder form to the final part are proposed to be reduced from 4-8 steps to only 2 steps utilizing a new technology that may even improve upon the titanium properties at the same time as it is reducing the number of steps of manufacture. The two-step procedure involves selecting a cylindrical or rectangular die and punch to compress a small amount of commercially pure titanium to a strong-enough compact for transportation to the friction stir welder to be consolidated. Friction stir welding invented in 1991 in the United Kingdom uses a tool, similar to a drill bit, to approach a sample and gradually plunge into the material at a certain rotation rate of between 100 to 2,100 RPM. In the second step, the friction stir welder is used to process the titanium powder held in a tight holder to consolidate into a harder titanium form. The resulting samples are cut to expose the cross section and then grinded, polished, and cleaned to be observed and tested using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and a Vickers microhardness tester. The results were that the thicker the sample, the harder the resulting consolidated sample ...
Date: August 2016
Creator: Nichols, Leannah Marie
Partner: UNT Libraries

Application of High Entropy Alloys in Stent Implants

Description: High entropy alloys (HEAs) are alloys with five or more principal elements. Due to these distinct concept of alloying, the HEA exhibits unique and superior properties. The outstanding properties of HEA includes higher strength/hardness, superior wear resistance, high temperature stability, higher fatigue life, good corrosion and oxidation resistance. Such characteristics of HEA has been significant interest leading to researches on these emerging field. Even though many works are done to understand the characteristic of these HEAs, very few works are made on how the HEAs can be applied for commercial uses. This work discusses the application of High entropy alloys in biomedical applications. The coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States kills more than 350,000 persons/year and it costs $108.9 billion for the nation each year in spite of significant advancements in medical care and public awareness. A cardiovascular disease affects heart or blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) or both by blocking the blood flow. As a surgical interventions, stent implants are deployed to cure or ameliorate the disease. However, the high failure rate of stents has lead researchers to give special attention towards analyzing stent structure, materials and characteristics. Many works related to alternate material and/or design are carried out in recent time. This paper discusses the feasibility of CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs in stent implant application. This work is based on the speculation that CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs are biocompatible material. These HEAs are characterized to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties. Computational modeling and analysis were carried out on stent implant by applying CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs as material to understand the structural behavior.
Date: May 2017
Creator: Alagarsamy, Karthik
Partner: UNT Libraries

Evaluation of Fine Particulate Matter Pollution Sources Affecting Dallas, Texas

Description: Dallas is the third largest growing industrialized city in the state of Texas. the prevailing air quality here is highly influenced by the industrialization and particulate matter 2.5µm (PM2.5) has been found to be one of the main pollutants in this region. Exposure to PM2.5 in elevated levels could cause respiratory problems and other health issues, some of which could be fatal. the current study dealt with the quantification and analysis of the sources of emission of PM2.5 and an emission inventory for PM2.5 was assessed. 24-hour average samples of PM2.5 were collected at two monitoring sites under the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) in Dallas, Dallas convention Centre (CAMS 312) and Dallas Hinton sites (CAMS 60). the data was collected from January 2003 to December 2009 and by using two positive matrix models PMF 2 and EPA PMF the PM2.5 source were identified. 9 sources were identified from CAMS 312 of which secondary sulfate (31% by PMF2 and 26% by EPA PMF) was found to be one of the major sources. Data from CAMS 60 enabled the identification of 8 sources by PMF2 and 9 by EPA PMF. These data also confirmed secondary sulfate (35% by PMF2 and 34% by EPA PMF) as the major source. to substantiate the sources identified, conditional probability function (CPF) was used. the influence of long range transport pollutants such as biomass burns from Mexico and Central America was found to be influencing the region of study and was assessed with the help of potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis. Weekend/weekday and seasonal analyses were useful in understanding the behavioral pattern of pollutants. Also an inter comparison of the model results were performed and EPA PMF results was found to be more robust and accurate than PMF 2 results.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Puthenparampil Koruth, Joseph
Partner: UNT Libraries

Estimation of Aircraft Emissions for the Corpus Christi International Airport, Corpus Christi, Texas

Description: Commercial aviation is a vital part of the United States economy. It generates over $1 trillion annually, which is more than 5% of the U.S. GDP, and produces approximately 10 million jobs. Every year there is an increase in commercial air traffic. This is attributed to expanding trade between states and other countries, which requires larger amounts of cargo aircraft in operation, and also catering to the growing number of middle and upper class passengers who travel for business and pleasure purposes. A rise in commercial aviation leads to the use of more aviation fuel on a monthly and annual basis. This in turn leads to escalated levels of combustion by-products from jet and turbofan engines into the atmosphere. The negative effects of these by-products range from producing poor air quality and consequent health hazards to contributing to global warming. This study is aimed at assessing the impacts of aircraft emissions on the local air quality in Corpus Christi using the Emissions and Dispersion Modeling System. Flight data for the study was obtained from the Department of Transportation's Research and Innovative Technology Administration. Analyses of the emissions were compared on monthly, annual, engine type and airline provider bases. Climatic, economic and anthropogenic factors were identified in the analyses.
Date: May 2013
Creator: Thomas, Gregson Johann
Partner: UNT Libraries