22 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Laboratory testing of percussion drills for geothermal applications

Description: Laboratory tests of percussion drilling tools which were done at Drilling Research Lab, Salt Lake City, during February 1980, are described. The purpose of the tests was threefold: (a) to compare the parenetration rates of different hammers with each other and with conventional rotary drilling; (b) to measure and compare the hammer pulses at normal and high temperatures; and (c) to establish hammer life and failure modes at high temperature. Two roller bit hammers and three solid bit hammers were tested. All exhibited much higher rates of penetration in granite than were obtained with conventional rotary techniques. Tests at high temperature revealed several failure modes for the air driven hammers. Minor modifications should allow operation of these hammers at high temperature.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drilling fluid temperatures in a magma - penetrating wellbore

Description: This paper describes the numerical modeling of the drilling fluid temperatures in a deep well that penetrates a magma body. The basic assumptions for the model are listed, the importance of the fluid temperature is considered, and the effect of changing the model parameters is assessed. The stratigraphy and formation temperature profile assumed for this hypothetical well are similar to Long Valley, CA, where a relatively shallow magma body is believed to exist. A major result of this modeling is demonstration of the benefit of insulated drillpipe.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motors

Description: This report describes the work done under contract to Sandia National Labs and to the Department of Energy for improvement of downhole drilling motors. The focus of this program was the development of a better bearing-and-seal assembly that could be used in different kinds of drilling motors in a geothermal environment. Major tasks were: (1) design and construction of seal testing devices, (2) screening and evaluation of candidate seals in a simulated bearing/seal package, (3) tests of the most promising candidates in a full-scale bearing/seal package, and (4) analysis of failed seals after testing. The key results from this program were: (1) identification of seal/shaft/lubricant systems that performed well at high pressure and temperature, (2) identification of other seal designs that should be avoided for similar applications, and (3) evaluation of the test machines' design.
Date: November 1, 1983
Creator: Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drilling program for Long Valley Caldera

Description: In September of this year, we will begin the first of four drilling phases in the Magma Energy Exploratory Well that is planned to reach a depth near 20,000 feet. This well will be used to verify the configuration of the magma body and to calibrate surface geophysical techniques against downhole data. It will also provide information of several kinds that is of interest to several groups: we will resolve geologic uncertainties---such as the location of fractured and abnormally pressured zones, chemistry of rocks and produced fluids, and magnitude of creep in the deep basement---that affect the drilling of any subsequent well, we will test drilling technology---e. g., high temperature drilling fluid, bits, coring, logging tools and tubulars---in a realistic environment, and we will gain insight on the history of collapse, resurgence, and intrusion in a major young caldera. 4 figs.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Update on slimhole drilling

Description: Sandia National Laboratories manages the US Department of Energy program for slimhole drilling. The principal objective of this program is to expand proven geothermal reserves through increased exploration made possible by lower-cost slimhole drilling. For this to be a valid exploration method, however, it is necessary to demonstrate that slimholes yield enough data to evaluate a geothermal reservoir, and that is the focus of Sandia`s current research.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Long Valley Well: Phase II operations

Description: Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August--September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6868 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Finger, J. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories

Description: From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.
Date: June 1, 1989
Creator: Finger, J.T. & Glowka, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Slim-hole drilling for geothermal exploration

Description: Drilling production-size holes for geothermal exploration puts a large expense at the beginning of the project, and thus requires a long period of debt service before those costs can be recaptured from power sales. If a reservoir can be adequately defined and proved by drilling smaller, cheaper slim-holes, production well drilling can be delayed until the power plant is under construction, saving years of interest payments. In the broadest terms, this project's objective is to demonstrate that a geothermal resevoir can be identified and evaluated with data collected in slim holes. We have assembled a coordinated working group, including personnel from Sandia, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, University of Utah Research Institute, US Geological Survey, independent consultants, and geothermal operators, to focus on the development of this project. This group is involved to a greater or lesser extent in all decisions affecting the direction of the research. Specific tasks being pursued include: Correlation of fluid flow and injection tests between slim-holes and production size wells. Transfer of slim-hole exploration drilling and reservoir assessment to industry so that slim-hole drilling becomes an accepted method for geothermal exploration.Development and validation of a coupled wellbore-reservoir flow simulator which can be used for reservoir evaluation from slim-hole flow data. Collection of applicable data from commercial wells in existing geothermal fields. Drilling of at least one new slim-hole and use it to evaluate a geothermal reservoir.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits

Description: A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Middleton, J.N. & Finger, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

Description: During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Finger, J.T. & Jacobson, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)

Description: This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Finger, J. T. & Jacobson, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drilling operations plan for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well

Description: This paper is a summary of the proposed drilling plan for the first phase (to 2500 feet depth) of the Magma Energy Exploratory Well. The drilling program comprises four phases, spaced approximately one year apart, which culminate in a large-diameter well to a total depth near 20,000 feet. Included here are descriptions of the well design, predictions of potential drilling problems, a list of restrictions imposed by regulatory agencies, an outline of Sandia's management structure, and an explanation of how the magma energy technology will benefit from this drilling. 3 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Finger, J.T.; Livesay, B.J. & Ash, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase 1 drilling operations at the Magma Energy Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

Description: This report describes the Phase 1 drilling operations for the Magma Energy Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. An important part of the Department of Energy's Magma Energy Program, this well is designed to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degree}C, whichever comes first. There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart, with scientific investigations in the borehole between the drilling intervals. Phase 1 of this project resulted in a 20 inch cased hole to 2558 feet, with 185 feet of coring beyond that. This document comprises a narrative of the daily activities, copies of the daily mud and lithologic reports, time breakdowns of rig activities, inventories of lost circulation materials, temperature logs of the cored hole, and a strip chart mud log. 2 figs.
Date: December 1, 1990
Creator: Finger, J.T. & Jacobson, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vale exploratory slimhole: Drilling and testing

Description: During April-May, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation, drilled a 5825{prime} exploratory slimhole (3.85 in. diameter) in the Vale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Vale, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During drilling we performed several temperature logs, and after drilling was complete we performed injection tests, bailing from a zone isolated by a packer, and repeated temperature logs. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: 2714{prime} of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid records; numerous temperature logs; pressure shut-in data from injection tests; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Vale KGRA. This report contains: (1) a narrative account of the drilling and testing, (2) a description of equipment used, (3) a brief geologic description of the formation drilled, (4) a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data, and (5) recommendations for future work.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D. & Hickox, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fort Bliss exploratory slimholes: Drilling and testing

Description: During November/96 to April/97 Sandia National Laboratories provided consulation, data collection, analysis and project documentation to the U.S. Army for a series of four geothermal exploratory slimholes drilled on the McGregor Range approximately 25 miles north of El Paso, Texas. This drilling was directed toward evaluating a potential reservoir for geothermal power generation in this area, with a secondary objective of assessing the potential for direct use applications such as space heating or water de-salinization. This report includes: representative temperature logs from the wells; daily drilling reports; a narrative account of the drilling and testing; a description of equipment used; a summary and preliminary interpretation of the data; and recommendations for future work.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Finger, J.T. & Jacobson, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Newberry exploratory slimhole

Description: During July-November, 1995, Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with CE Exploration, drilled a 5,360 foot exploratory slimhole (3.85 inches diameter) in the Newberry Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) near Bend, Oregon. This well was part of Sandia`s program to evaluate slimholes as a geothermal exploration tool. During and after drilling the authors performed numerous temperature logs, and at the completion of drilling attempted to perform injection tests. In addition to these measurements, the well`s data set includes: over 4,000 feet of continuous core (with detailed log); daily drilling reports from Sandia and from drilling contractor personnel; daily drilling fluid record; and comparative data from other wells drilled in the Newberry KGRA.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Finger, J.T. & Jacobson, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced drilling systems

Description: Drilling is ubiquitous in oil, gas, geothermal, minerals, water well, and mining industries. Drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing power from geothermal energy. Reduced drilling costs will reduce the cost of electricity produced from geothermal resources. Undoubtedly, there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied. However, the breadth and depth of previous efforts in this area almost guarantee that any new efforts will at least initially build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts, coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems, provide the basis for this study.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Pierce, K. G.; Finger, J. T. & Livesay, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Proposal for an Advanced Drilling System with Real-Time Diagnostics (Diagnostics-While-Drilling)

Description: In this paper, we summarize the rationale for an advanced system called Diagnostics-While-Drilling (DWD) and describe its benefits, preliminary configuration, and essential characteristics. The central concept is a closed data circuit in which downhole sensors collect information and send it to the surface via a high-speed data link, where it is combined with surface measurements and processed through drilling advisory software. The driller then uses this information to adjust the drilling process, sending control signals back downhole with real-time knowledge of their effects on performance. We outline a Program Plan for DOE, university, and industry to cooperate in the development of DWD technology.
Date: July 12, 1999
Creator: Finger, J.T.; Mansure, A.J. & Prairie, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterizing the Weeks Island Salt Dome drilling of and seismic measurements from boreholes

Description: A sinkhole 36 ft across, 30 ft deep was first observed in the alluvium over the Weeks Island Salt Dome (salt mine converted for oil storage by US Strategic Petroleum Reserve) May 1992. Four vertical, two slanted boreholes were drilled for diagnostics. Crosswell seismic data were generated; the velocity images suggest that the sinkhole collapse is complicated, not a simple vertical structure. The coring operation was moderately difficult; limited core was obtained through the alluvium, and the quality of the salt core from the first two vertical wells was poor. Core quality improved with better bit selection, mud, and drilling method. The drilling fluid program provided fairly stable holes allowing open hole logs to be run. All holes were cemented successfully (although it took 3 attempts in one case).
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Sattler, A.R.; Harding, R.S.; Jacobson, R.D.; Finger, J.T.; Keefe, R. & Neal, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Systems study of drilling for installation of geothermal heat pumps

Description: Geothermal, or ground-source, heat pumps (GHP) are much more efficient than air-source units such as conventional air conditioners. A major obstacle to their use is the relatively high initial cost of installing the heat-exchange loops into the ground. In an effort to identify drivers which influence installation cost, a number of site visits were made during 1996 to assess the state-of-the-art in drilling for GHP loop installation. As an aid to quantifying the effect of various drilling-process improvements, we constructed a spread-sheet based on estimated time and material costs for all the activities required in a typical loop-field installation. By substituting different (improved) values into specific activity costs, the effect on total project costs can be easily seen. This report contains brief descriptions of the site visits, key points learned during the visits, copies of the spread-sheet, recommendations for further work, and sample results from sensitivity analysis using the spread-sheet.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Finger, J.T.; Sullivan, W.N.; Jacobson, R.D. & Pierce, K.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department