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Patterned functional arrays by selective de-wetting

Description: Using a micro-Contact Printing ({mu}-CP) technique, substrates are prepared with patterns of hydrophilic, hydroxyl-terminated SAMS and hydrophobic methyl-terminated SAMS. Beginning with a homogeneous solution of silica, surfactant, ethanol, water, and functional silane, preferential ethanol evaporation during dip-coating, causes water enrichment and selective de-wetting of the hydrophobic SAMS. Correspondingly, film deposition occurs exclusively on the patterned hydrophilic SAMS. In addition, by co-condensation of tetrafunctional silanes (Si(OR){sub 4}) with tri-functional organosilanes ((RO){sub 3}Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}NH{sub 2}), the authors have selectively derived the silica framework with functional amine NH{sub 2} groups. A pH sensitive, micro-fluidic system was formed by further conjugation reactions with pH sensitive dye molecules.
Date: May 11, 2000
Creator: FAN,HONGYOU; DOSHI,DHAVAL; LU,YUNFENG & BRINKER,C. JEFFREY
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid Prototyping of Patterned Multifunctional Nanostructures

Description: The ability to engineer ordered arrays of objects on multiple length scales has potential for applications such as microelectronics, sensors, wave guides, and photonic lattices with tunable band gaps. Since the invention of surfactant templated mesoporous sieves in 1992, great progress has been made in controlling different mesophases in the form of powders, particles, fibers, and films. To date, although there have been several reports of patterned mesostructures, materials prepared have been limited to metal oxides with no specific functionality. For many of the envisioned applications of hierarchical materials in micro-systems, sensors, waveguides, photonics, and electronics, it is necessary to define both form and function on several length scales. In addition, the patterning strategies utilized so far require hours or even days for completion. Such slow processes are inherently difficult to implement in commercial environments. The authors present a series of new methods of producing patterns within seconds. Combining sol-gel chemistry, Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly (EISA), and rapid prototyping techniques like pen lithography, ink-jet printing, and dip-coating on micro-contact printed substrates, they form hierarchically organized silica structures that exhibit order and function on multiple scales: on the molecular scale, functional organic moieties are positioned on pore surfaces, on the mesoscale, mono-sized pores are organized into 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional networks, providing size-selective accessibility from the gas or liquid phase, and on the macroscale, 2-dimensional arrays and fluidic or photonic systems may be defined. These rapid patterning techniques establish for the first time a link between computer-aided design and rapid processing of self-assembled nanostructures.
Date: July 18, 2000
Creator: FAN,HONGYOU; LU,YUNFENG; LOPEZ,GABRIEL P. & BRINKER,C. JEFFREY
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.

Description: This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E. & Forsythe, James Chris
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formation of Mesostructured Nanoparticles through Self-Assembly and Aerosol Process

Description: Silica nanoparticles exhibiting hexagonal, cubic, and vesicular mesostructures have been prepared using aerosol assisted, self-assembled process. This process begins with homogennous aerosol droplets containing silica source, water, ethanol, and surfactant, in which surfactant concentration is far below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Solvent evaporation enriches silica and surfactant inducing interfacial self-assembly confined to a spherical aerosol droplet and results in formation of completely solid, ordered spherical particles with stable hexagonal, cubic, or vesicular mesostructures.
Date: May 7, 1999
Creator: Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Fan, Hongyou; Lu, Yunfeng; Rieker, Thomas; Stump, Arron & Ward, Timothy L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optical patterning of photosensitive thin film silica mesophases

Description: Photosensitive films incorporating molecular photoacid generators compartmentalized within a silica-surfactant mesophase were prepared by an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. UV-exposure promoted localized acid-catalyzed siloxane condensation, enabling selective etching of unexposed regions, thereby serving as a resistless technique to prepare patterned mesoporous silica. The authors also demonstrated an optically-defined mesophase transformation (hexagonal {r_arrow} tetragonal) and patterning of refractive index and wetting behavior. Spatial control of structure and function on the macro- and mesoscales is of interest for sensor arrays, nano-reactors, photonic and fluidic devices, and low dielectric constant films. More importantly, it extends the capabilities of conventional lithography from spatially defining the presence or absence of film to spatial control of film structure and function.
Date: February 9, 2000
Creator: DOSHI,DHAVAL A.; HUESING,NICOLA K.; LU,MENGCHENG; FAN,HONGYOU; HURD,ALAN J. & BRINKER,C. JEFFREY
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanoporous films for epitaxial growth of single crystal semiconductor materials : final LDRD report.

Description: This senior council Tier 1 LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, photolithographically patterned SU-8 and carbonized SU-8 structures. Use of photolithographically defined growth templates represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.
Date: October 1, 2007
Creator: Rowen, Adam M.; Koleske, Daniel David; Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Burckel, David Bruce; Williams, John Dalton et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Real-time studies of battery electrochemical reactions inside a transmission electron microscope.

Description: We report the development of new experimental capabilities and ab initio modeling for real-time studies of Li-ion battery electrochemical reactions. We developed three capabilities for in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies: a capability that uses a nanomanipulator inside the TEM to assemble electrochemical cells with ionic liquid or solid state electrolytes, a capability that uses on-chip assembly of battery components on to TEM-compatible multi-electrode arrays, and a capability that uses a TEM-compatible sealed electrochemical cell that we developed for performing in-situ TEM using volatile battery electrolytes. These capabilities were used to understand lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale battery materials, including SnO{sub 2}, Si, Ge, Al, ZnO, and MnO{sub 2}. The modeling approaches used ab initio molecular dynamics to understand early stages of ethylene carbonate reduction on lithiated-graphite and lithium surfaces and constrained density functional theory to understand ethylene carbonate reduction on passivated electrode surfaces.
Date: January 1, 2012
Creator: Leung, Kevin; Hudak, Nicholas S.; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Fan, Hongyou; Subramanian, Arunkumar et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly of Hybrid Bridged Silsesquioxane Film and Particulate Mesophases with Integral Organic Functionality

Description: Since the discovery of surfactant-templated silica mesophases, the development of organic modification schemes to impart functionality to the pore surfaces has received much attention. Most recently, using the general class of compounds referred to as bridged silsesquioxanes (RO){sub 3}Si-R{prime}-Si(OR){sub 3} (Scheme 1), three research groups have reported the formation of a new class of poly(bridgedsilsesquioxane) mesophases BSQMs with integral organic functionality. In contrast to previous hybrid mesophases where organic ligands or molecules are situated on pore surfaces, this class of materials necessarily incorporates the organic constituents into the framework as molecularly dispersed bridging ligands. Although it is anticipated that this new mesostructural organization should result in synergistic properties derived from the molecular scale mixing of the inorganic and organic components, few properties of BSQMs have been measured. In addition samples prepared to date have been in the form of granular precipitates, precluding their use in applications like membranes, fluidics, and low k dielectric films needed for all foreseeable future generations of microelectronics.
Date: June 12, 2000
Creator: LU,YUNFENG; FAN,HONGYOU; DOKE,NILESH; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; ASSINK,ROGER A.; LAVAN,DAVID A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid prototyping of patterned functional nanostructures

Description: Living systems exhibit form and function on multiple length scales, and the prospect of imparting life-like qualities to man-made materials has inspired many recent efforts to devise hierarchical materials assembly strategies. For example, Yang et al. grew surfactant-templated mesoporous silica on hydrophobic patterns prepared by micro-contact printing {micro}CP{sup 3}. Trau et al. formed oriented mesoporous silica patterns, using a micro-molding in capillaries MIMIC technique, and Yang et al. combined MIMIC, polystyrene sphere templating, and surfactant-templating to create oxides with three levels of structural order. Overall, great progress has been made to date in controlling structure on scales ranging from several nanometers to several micrometers. However, materials prepared have been limited to oxides with no specific functionality, whereas for many of the envisioned applications of hierarchical materials in micro-systems, sensors, waveguides, photonics, and electronics, it is necessary to define both form and function on several length scales. In addition, the patterning strategies employed thus far require hours or even days for completion. Such slow processes are inherently difficult to implement in commercial environments. The authors have combined evaporation-induced (silica/surfactant) self-assembly EISA with rapid prototyping techniques like pen lithography, ink-jet printing, and dip-coating on micro-contact printed substrates to form hierarchically organized structures in seconds. In addition, by co-condensation of tetrafunctional silanes (Si(OR){sub 4}) with tri-functional organosilanes ((RO){sub 3}SiR{prime}){sup 12--14} or by inclusion of organic additives, the authors have selectively derivatized the silica framework with functional R{prime} ligands or molecules. The resulting materials exhibit form and function on multiple length scales: on the molecular scale, functional organic moieties are positioned on pore surfaces, on the mesoscale, monosized pores are organized into 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional networks, providing size-selective accessibility from the gas or liquid phase, and on the macroscale, 2-dimensional arrays and fluidic or photonic systems may be defined.
Date: February 9, 2000
Creator: Fan, Hongyou; Lu, Yunfeng; Stump, Aaron; Reed, Scott T.; Baer, Thomas A.; Schunk, P. Randall et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

Description: Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.
Date: October 1, 2011
Creator: Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

Description: In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.
Date: October 1, 2011
Creator: Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bai, Feng (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Mark Andrew et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

Description: This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.
Date: November 1, 2006
Creator: Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New self-assembled nanocrystal micelles for biolabels and biosensors.

Description: The ability of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to display multiple (size-specific) colors simultaneously during a single, long term excitation holds great promise for their use in fluorescent bio-imaging. The main challenges of using nanocrystals as biolabels are achieving biocompatibility, low non-specific adsorption, and no aggregation. In addition, functional groups that can be used to further couple and conjugate with biospecies (proteins, DNAs, antibodies, etc.) are required. In this project, we invented a new route to the synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible NCs. Our approach is to encapsulate as-synthesized, monosized, hydrophobic NCs within the hydrophobic cores of micelles composed of a mixture of surfactants and phospholipids containing head groups functionalized with polyethylene glycol (-PEG), -COOH, and NH{sub 2} groups. PEG provided biocompatibility and the other groups were used for further biofunctionalization. The resulting water-soluble metal and semiconductor NC-micelles preserve the optical properties of the original hydrophobic NCs. Semiconductor NCs emit the same color; they exhibit equal photoluminescence (PL) intensity under long-time laser irradiation (one week) ; and they exhibit the same PL lifetime (30-ns). The results from transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescent imaging indicate that water-soluble semiconductor NC-micelles are biocompatible and exhibit no aggregation in cells. We have extended the surfactant/lipid encapsulation techniques to synthesize water-soluble magnetic NC-micelles. Transmission electron microscopy results suggest that water-soluble magnetic NC-micelles exhibit no aggregation. The resulting NC-micelles preserve the magnetic properties of the original hydrophobic magnetic NCs. Viability studies conducted using yeast cells suggest that the magnetic nanocrystal-micelles are biocompatible. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that using external oscillating magnetic fields to manipulate the magnetic micelles, we can kill live cells, presenting a new magnetodynamic therapy without side effects.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Tallant, David Robert; Wilson, Michael C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Leve, Erik W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Gabaldon, John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cell-directed assembly on an integrated nanoelectronic/nanophotonic device for probing cellular responses on the nanoscale.

Description: Our discovery that the introduction of living cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alters dramatically the evaporation driven self-assembly of lipid-silica nanostructures suggested the formation of novel bio/nano interfaces useful for cellular interrogation at the nanoscale. This one year ''out of the box'' LDRD focused on the localization of metallic and semi-conducting nanocrystals at the fluid, lipid-rich interface between S. cerevisiae and the surrounding phospholipid-templated silica nanostructure with the primary goal of creating Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-active nanostructures and platforms for cellular integration into electrode arrays. Such structures are of interest for probing cellular responses to the onset of disease, understanding of cell-cell communication, and the development of cell-based bio-sensors. As SERS is known to be sensitive to the size and shape of metallic (principally gold and silver) nanocrystals, various sizes and shapes of nanocrystals were synthesized, functionalized and localized at the cellular surface by our ''cell-directed assembly'' approach. Laser scanning confocal microscopy, SEM, and in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed to study metallic nanocrystal localization. Preliminary Raman spectroscopy studies were conducted to test for SERS activity. Interferometric lithography was used to construct high aspect ratio cylindrical holes on patterned gold substrates and electro-deposition experiments were performed in a preliminary attempt to create electrode arrays. A new printing procedure was also developed for cellular integration into nanostructured platforms that avoids solvent exposure and may mitigate osmotic stress. Using a different approach, substrates comprised of self-assembled nanoparticles in a phospholipid templated silica film were also developed. When printed on top of these substrates, the cells integrate themselves into the mesoporous silica film and direct organization of the nanoparticles to the cell surface for integration into the cell.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Lopez, DeAnna (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Simpson, Regina Lynn et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scalable assembly of patterned ordered functional micelle arrays : final LDRD report.

Description: Abstract Not Provided
Date: September 1, 2012
Creator: Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bai, Feng (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ta, Anh (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Haddad, Raid Edward (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Boye, Daniel M. (Davidson College, Davidson, NC) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department