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Nonlinear dynamics experiments

Description: The goal of nonlinear dynamics experiments is to improve the understanding of single particle effects that increase the particle amplitude and lead to loss. Particle motion in storage rings is nearly conservative and for transverse dynamics the Hamiltonian in action angle variables (I{sub x},I{sub y},{phi}{sub x},{phi}{sub y}) near an isolated resonance k{nu}{sub x} + l{nu}{sub y} {approx} p is H = I{sub x}{nu}{sub x0} + I{sub y}{nu}{sub y0} + g(I{sub x}, I{sub y}) + h(I{sub x}, I{sub y})cos(k{phi}{sub x} + l{phi}{sub y} - p{theta}), (1) where k, l, p are integers, {theta} = 2{pi}s/L is the azimuth, and s and L are the path length and circumference respectively. The amplitude dependent tunes are given by {nu}{sub x,y}(I{sub x},I{sub y}) = {nu}{sub x0,y0} + {partial_derivative}g(I{sub x},I{sub y})/{partial_derivative}I{sub x,y} (2) and h(I{sub x},I{sub y}) is the resonance driving term (RDT). If the motion is governed by multiple resonances, h(I{sub x},I{sub y}) has to be replace by a series of terms. The particle motion is completely determined by the terms g and h, which can be calculated from higher order multipoles (Sec. ??), or obtained from simulations. Deviations from pure Hamiltonian motion occur due to synchrotron radiation damping (Sec. ??) in lepton or very high energy hadron rings, parameter variations, and diffusion processes such as residual gas and intrabeam scattering. The time scale of the non-Hamiltonian process determines the applicability of the Hamiltonian analysis. Transverse nonlinearities are introduced through sextupoles or higher order multipoles and magnetic field errors in dipoles and quadrupoles. Sextupoles can already drive all resonances. The beam-beam interaction and space charge also introduce nonlinear fields. Intentionally introduced nonlinearities are used to extract beam on a resonance or through capture in stable islands. Localization and minimization of nonlinearities in a ring is a general strategy to decrease emittance growth and increase ...
Date: January 1, 2011
Creator: Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

Description: The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g. <P>).
Date: August 18, 2011
Creator: Fischer, W. & Bazilevsky, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUMMARY OF THE ECL2 WORKSHOP

Description: We summarize the ECL2 workshop on electron cloud clearing, which was held at CERN in early March 2007, and highlight a number of novel ideas for electron cloud suppression, such as continuous clearing electrodes based on enamel, slotted structures, and electrete inserts.
Date: April 9, 2007
Creator: FISCHER,W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational challenges for beam-beam simulation for RHIC

Description: In this article we will review the computational challenges in the beam-beam simulation for the polarized proton run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The difficulties in our multi-particle and million turn tracking to calculate the proton beam lifetime and proton beam emittance growth due to head-on beam-beam interaction and head-on beam-beam compensation are presented and discussed. Solutions to obtain meaningful physics results from these trackings are proposed and tested. In the end we will present the progress in the benchmarking of the RHIC operational proton beam lifetime.
Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Luo, Y. & Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC OPERATIONAL STATUS AND UPGRADE PLANS.

Description: Since 2000 RHIC has collided, at 8 energies, 4 combinations of ion species, ranging from gold ions to polarized protons, and including the collisions of deuterons with gold ions. During that time the heavy ion and polarized proton peak luminosities increased by two orders and one order of magnitude respectively. The average proton polarization in store reached 65%. Planned upgrades include the evolution to the Enhanced Design parameters by about 2008, the construction of an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) by 2009, the installation of electron cooling for RHIC II, and the implementation of the electron-ion collider eRHIC. We review the current performance, and the expected performance with these upgrades.
Date: June 23, 2006
Creator: FISCHER, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

Description: Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.
Date: September 18, 2005
Creator: FISCHER, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC LUMINOSITY UPGRADE PROGRAM

Description: The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operates with either ions or polarized protons. After increasing the heavy ion luminosity by two orders of magnitude since its commissioning in 2000, the current luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase by another factor of 4 by means of 3D stochastic cooling and a new 56 MHz SRF system. An Electron Beam Ion Source is being commissioned that will allow the use of uranium beams. Electron cooling is considered for collider operation below the current injection energy. For the polarized proton operation both luminosity and polarization are important. In addition to ongoing improvements in the AGS injector, the construction of a new high-intensity polarized source has started. In RHIC a number of upgrades are under way to increase the intensity and polarization transmission to 250 GeV beam energy. Electron lenses will be installed to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect.
Date: May 23, 2010
Creator: Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RHIC PROTON BEAM LIFETIME INCREASE WITH 10- AND 12-POLE CORRECTORS

Description: The RHIC beam lifetime in polarized proton operation is dominated by the beam-beam effect, parameter modulations, and nonlinear magnet errors in the interaction region magnets. Sextupole and skew sextupole errors have been corrected deterministically for a number of years based on tune shift measurements with orbit bumps in the triplets. During the most recent polarized proton run 10- and 12- pole correctors were set through an iterative procedure, and used for the first time operationally in one of the beams. We report on the procedure to set these high-order multipole correctors and estimate their effect on the integrated luminosity.
Date: May 23, 2010
Creator: Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation study of dynamic aperture with head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

Description: In this note we summarize the calculated 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures with the proposed head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are planning to introduce a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device to provide the electron beam is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we compare the calculated dynamic apertures without and with head-on beam-beam compensation. The effects of adjusted phase advances between IP8 and the center of e-lens and second order chromaticity correction are checked. In the end we will scan the proton and electron beam parameters with head-on beam-beam compensation.
Date: August 1, 2010
Creator: Luo, Y. & Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Storage Rings

Description: Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron ...
Date: January 1, 2011
Creator: Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction in a high luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider with head-on beam-beam compensation

Description: The luminosity of a ring-ring electron-ion collider is limited by the beam-beam effect on the electrons. Simulation studies have shown that for short ion bunches this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation via an electron lens. However, due to the large beam-beam parameter experienced by the electrons, together with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP, electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside both the long ion bunches and the electron lens. Recent results of our simulation studies of this effect will be presented.
Date: May 23, 2010
Creator: Montag, C. & Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

6-D weak-strong beam-beam simulation study of proton lifetime in presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

Description: In this note we summarize the calculated particle loss of a proton bunch in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are introducing a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we calculate and compare the particle loss of a proton bunch with head-on beam-beam compensation, phase advance of k{pi} between IP8 and the center of the e-lens and second order chromaticity correction. We scanned the proton beam's linear chromaticity, working point and bunch intensity. We also scanned the electron beam's intensity, transverse beam size. The effect of the electron-proton transverse offset in the e-lens was studied. In the study 6-D weak-strong beam-beam interaction model a la Hirata is used for proton collisions at IP6 and IP8. The e-lens is modeled as 8 slices. Each slice is modeled with as drift - (4D beam-beam kick) - drift.
Date: August 1, 2010
Creator: Luo, Y. & Fischer, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First observations of beam losses due to bound-free pairproduction in a heavy-ion collider

Description: We report the first observations of beam losses due tobound-free pair production at the interaction point of a heavy-ioncollider. This process is expected to be a major luminosity limit for theLarge Hadron Collider (LHC) when it operates with 208Pb82+ ions becausethe localized energy deposition by the lost ions may quenchsuperconducting magnet coils. Measurements were performed at theRelativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) during operation with 100GeV/nucleon 63Cu29+ ions. At RHIC, the rate, energy and magnetic fieldare low enough so that magnet quenching is not an issue. The hadronicshowers produced when the single-electron ions struck the RHIC beampipewere observed using an array of photodiodes. The measurement confirms theorder of magnitude of the theoretical cross section previously calculatedby others.
Date: June 15, 2007
Creator: Bruce, R.; Jowett, J.M.; Gilardoni, S.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chromatic analysis and possible local chromatic correction in RHIC

Description: In this article we will answer the following questions for the RHIC polarized proton (p-p) and Au-Au run lattices: (1) what are the sources of second order chromaticities? (2) what is the dependence of second order chromaticity on the on-momentum {beta}-beat? (3) what is the dependence of second order chromaticity on {beta}* at IP6 and IP8? To answer these questions, we use the perturbation theory to numerically calculate the contributions of each quadrupole and sextupole to the first, second, and third order chromaticities. Possible local methods to reduce chromatic effects in RHIC ring are shortly discussed.
Date: March 28, 2011
Creator: Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X. & Trbojevic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department