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Torsional ultrasonic technique for reactor vessel liquid level measurement

Description: We have undertaken a detailed study of an ultrasonic waveguide employed as a level, density, and temperature sensor. The purpose of this study was to show how such a device might be used in the nuclear power industry to provide reliable level information with a multifunction sensor, thus overcomming several of the errors that led to the accident at Three Mile Island. Some additional work is needed to answer the questions raised by the current study, most noticably the damping effects of flowing water.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

Description: The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultrasonic level and temperature sensor for power reactor applications

Description: An ultrasonic waveguide employing torsional and extensional acoustic waves has been developed for use as a level and temperature sensor in pressurized and boiling water nuclear power reactors. Features of the device include continuous measurement of level, density, and temperature producing a real-time profile of these parameters along a chosen path through the reactor vessel.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Dress, W.B.: Miller, G.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications of a fast, continuous wavelet transform

Description: A fast, continuous, wavelet transform, based on Shannon`s sampling theorem in frequency space, has been developed for use with continuous mother wavelets and sampled data sets. The method differs from the usual discrete-wavelet approach and the continuous-wavelet transform in that, here, the wavelet is sampled in the frequency domain. Since Shannon`s sampling theorem lets us view the Fourier transform of the data set as a continuous function in frequency space, the continuous nature of the functions is kept up to the point of sampling the scale-translation lattice, so the scale-translation grid used to represent the wavelet transform is independent of the time- domain sampling of the signal under analysis. Computational cost and nonorthogonality aside, the inherent flexibility and shift invariance of the frequency-space wavelets has advantages. The method has been applied to forensic audio reconstruction speaker recognition/identification, and the detection of micromotions of heavy vehicles associated with ballistocardiac impulses originating from occupants` heart beats. Audio reconstruction is aided by selection of desired regions in the 2-D representation of the magnitude of the transformed signal. The inverse transform is applied to ridges and selected regions to reconstruct areas of interest, unencumbered by noise interference lying outside these regions. To separate micromotions imparted to a mass-spring system (e.g., a vehicle) by an occupants beating heart from gross mechanical motions due to wind and traffic vibrations, a continuous frequency-space wavelet, modeled on the frequency content of a canonical ballistocardiogram, was used to analyze time series taken from geophone measurements of vehicle micromotions. By using a family of mother wavelets, such as a set of Gaussian derivatives of various orders, features such as the glottal closing rate and word and phrase segmentation may be extracted from voice data.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inductive learning as a fusion engine for mine detection

Description: Semiotics is defined by some researchers as {open_quotes}the study of the appearance (visual or otherwise) meaning, and use of symbols and symbol systems.{close_quotes} Semiotic fusion of data from multiple sensory sources is a potential solution to the problem of landmine detection. This turns out to be significant, because notwithstanding the diversity of sensor technologies being used to attack the problem, there is no single effective landmine sensor technology. The only practical, general-purpose mine detector presently available is the trained dog. Most research into mine-detection technology seeds to emulate the dog`s seemingly uncanny abilities. An ideal data-fusion system would mimic animal reaction, with the brain`s perceptive power melding multiple sensory cues into an awareness of the size and location of a mine. Furthermore, the fusion process should be adaptive, with the skill at combining cues into awareness improving with experience. Electronic data-fusion systems reported in the countermine literature use conventional vector-based pattern recognition methods. Although neural nets are popular, they have never satisfactorily met the challenge. Despite years of investigation, nobody has ever found a vector space representation that reliably characterizes mine identity. This strongly suggests that the features have not been found because researchers have been looking for the wrong characteristics. It is worth considering that dogs probably do not represent data as mathematical number lists, but they almost certainly represent data via semiotic structures.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Kercel, S.W. & Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Bayesian approach to extracting meaning from system behavior

Description: The modeling relation and its reformulation to include the semiotic hierarchy is essential for the understanding, control, and successful re-creation of natural systems. This presentation will argue for a careful application of Rosen`s modeling relationship to the problems of intelligence and autonomy in natural and artificial systems. To this end, the authors discuss the essential need for a correct theory of induction, learning, and probability; and suggest that modern Bayesian probability theory, developed by Cox, Jaynes, and others, can adequately meet such demands, especially on the operational level of extracting meaning from observations. The methods of Bayesian and maximum Entropy parameter estimation have been applied to measurements of system observables to directly infer the underlying differential equations generating system behavior. This approach by-passes the usual method of parameter estimation based on assuming a functional form for the observable and then estimating the parameters that would lead to the particular observed behavior. The computational savings is great since only location parameters enter into the maximum-entropy calculations; this innovation finesses the need for nonlinear parameters altogether. Such an approach more directly extracts the semantics inherent in a given system by going to the root of system meaning as expressed by abstract form or shape, rather than in syntactic particulars, such as signal amplitude and phase. Examples will be shown how the form of a system can be followed while ignoring unnecessary details. In this sense, the authors are observing the meaning of the words rather than being concerned with their particular expression or language. For the present discussion, empirical models are embodied by the differential equations underlying, producing, or describing the behavior of a process as measured or tracked by a particular variable set--the observables. The a priori models are probability structures that capture syntactical relationships within the formal system that mirrors ...
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Epistemology and Rosen's Modeling Relation

Description: Rosen's modeling relation is embedded in Popper's three worlds to provide an heuristic tool for model building and a guide for thinking about complex systems. The utility of this construct is demonstrated by suggesting a solution to the problem of pseudo science and a resolution of the famous Bohr-Einstein debates. A theory of bizarre systems is presented by an analogy with entangled particles of quantum mechanics. This theory underscores the poverty of present-day computational systems (e.g., computers) for creating complex and bizarre entities by distinguishing between mechanism and organism.
Date: November 7, 1999
Creator: Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of an anticipatory noncontact precrash restraint actuation system

Description: The problem of providing an electronic warning of an impending crash to a precrash restraint system a fraction of a second before physical contact differs from more widely explored problems, such as providing several seconds of crash warning to a driver. One approach to precrash restraint sensing is to apply anticipatory system theory. This consists of nested simplified models of the system to be controlled and of the system`s environment. It requires sensory information to describe the ``current state`` of the system and the environment. The models use the sensory data to make a faster-than-real-time prediction about the near future. Anticipation theory is well founded but rarely used. A major problem is to extract real-time current-state information from inexpensive sensors. Providing current-state information to the nested models is the weakest element of the system. Therefore, sensors and real-time processing of sensor signals command the most attention in an assessment of system feasibility. This paper describes problem definition, potential ``showstoppers,`` and ways to overcome them. It includes experiments showing that inexpensive radar is a practical sensing element. It considers fast and inexpensive algorithms to extract information from sensor data.
Date: 1995
Creator: Kercel, S. W. & Dress, W. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Event identification by acoustic signature recognition

Description: Many events of interest to the security commnnity produce acoustic emissions that are, in principle, identifiable as to cause. Some obvious examples are gunshots, breaking glass, takeoffs and landings of small aircraft, vehicular engine noises, footsteps (high frequencies when on gravel, very low frequencies. when on soil), and voices (whispers to shouts). We are investigating wavelet-based methods to extract unique features of such events for classification and identification. We also discuss methods of classification and pattern recognition specifically tailored for acoustic signatures obtained by wavelet analysis. The paper is divided into three parts: completed work, work in progress, and future applications. The completed phase has led to the successful recognition of aircraft types on landing and takeoff. Both small aircraft (twin-engine turboprop) and large (commercial airliners) were included in the study. The project considered the design of a small, field-deployable, inexpensive device. The techniques developed during the aircraft identification phase were then adapted to a multispectral electromagnetic interference monitoring device now deployed in a nuclear power plant. This is a general-purpose wavelet analysis engine, spanning 14 octaves, and can be adapted for other specific tasks. Work in progress is focused on applying the methods previously developed to speaker identification. Some of the problems to be overcome include recognition of sounds as voice patterns and as distinct from possible background noises (e.g., music), as well as identification of the speaker from a short-duration voice sample. A generalization of the completed work and the work in progress is a device capable of classifying any number of acoustic events-particularly quasi-stationary events such as engine noises and voices and singular events such as gunshots and breaking glass. We will show examples of both kinds of events and discuss their recognition likelihood.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Dress, W.B. & Kercel, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wavelet-based acoustic recognition of aircraft

Description: We describe a wavelet-based technique for identifying aircraft from acoustic emissions during take-off and landing. Tests show that the sensor can be a single, inexpensive hearing-aid microphone placed close to the ground the paper describes data collection, analysis by various technique, methods of event classification, and extraction of certain physical parameters from wavelet subspace projections. The primary goal of this paper is to show that wavelet analysis can be used as a divide-and-conquer first step in signal processing, providing both simplification and noise filtering. The idea is to project the original signal onto the orthogonal wavelet subspaces, both details and approximations. Subsequent analysis, such as system identification, nonlinear systems analysis, and feature extraction, is then carried out on the various signal subspaces.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Dress, W. B. & Kercel, S. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cellular automata modeling of weld solidification structure

Description: The authors explore the use of cellular automata in modeling arc-welding processes. A brief discussion of cellular automata and their previous use in micro-scale solidification simulations is presented. Macro-scale thermal calculations for arc-welding at a thin plate are shown to give good quantitative and qualitative results. Combining the two calculations in a single cellular array provides a realistic simulation of grain growth in a welding process. Results of simulating solidification in a moving melt pool in a poly-crystalline alloy sheet are presented.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Dress, W.B.; Zacharia, T. & Radhakrishnan, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Developing a CD-CBM Anticipatory Approach for Cavitation - Defining a Model-Based Descriptor Consistent Across Processes, Phase 1 Final Report Context-Dependent Prognostics and Health Assessment: A New Paradigm for Condition-based Maintenance SBIR Topic No. N98-114

Description: The objective of this research, and subsequent testing, was to identify specific features of cavitation that could be used as a model-based descriptor in a context-dependent condition-based maintenance (CD-CBM) anticipatory prognostic and health assessment model. This descriptor is based on the physics of the phenomena, capturing the salient features of the process dynamics. The test methodology and approach were developed to make the cavitation features the dominant effect in the process and collected signatures. This would allow the accurate characterization of the salient cavitation features at different operational states. By developing such an abstraction, these attributes can be used as a general diagnostic for a system or any of its components. In this study, the particular focus will be pumps. As many as 90% of pump failures are catastrophic. They seem to be operating normally and fail abruptly without warning. This is true whether the failure is sudden hardware damage requiring repair, such as a gasket failure, or a transition into an undesired operating mode, such as cavitation. This means that conventional diagnostic methods fail to predict 90% of incipient failures and that in addressing this problem, model-based methods can add value where it is actually needed.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Allgood, G. O.; Dress, W. B. & Kercel, S. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Developing a CD-CBM Anticipatory Approach for Cavitation - Defining a Model Descriptor Consistent Between Processes

Description: A major problem with cavitation in pumps and other hydraulic devices is that there is no effective method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional approach is to declare the pump in cavitation when the total head pressure drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3o/0) in response to a reduction in pump inlet pressure. However, the pump is already cavitating at this point. A method is needed in which cavitation events are captured as they occur and characterized by their process dynamics. The object of this research was to identify specific features of cavitation that could be used as a model-based descriptor in a context-dependent condition-based maintenance (CD-CBM) anticipatory prognostic and health assessment model. This descriptor was based on the physics of the phenomena, capturing the salient features of the process dynamics. An important element of this concept is the development and formulation of the extended process feature vector @) or model vector. Thk model-based descriptor encodes the specific information that describes the phenomena and its dynamics and is formulated as a data structure consisting of several elements. The first is a descriptive model abstracting the phenomena. The second is the parameter list associated with the functional model. The third is a figure of merit, a single number between [0,1] representing a confidence factor that the functional model and parameter list actually describes the observed data. Using this as a basis and applying it to the cavitation problem, any given location in a flow loop will have this data structure, differing in value but not content. The extended process feature vector is formulated as follows: E`> [ <f(x,t,)>, {parameter Iist}, confidence factor]. (1) For this study, the model that characterized cavitation was a chirped-exponentially decaying sinusoid. Using the parameters defined by this model, the parameter list included frequency, decay, ...
Date: May 10, 1999
Creator: Allgood, G. O.; Dress, W. B. & Kercel, S. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anticipatory precrash restraint sensor feasibility study: Final report

Description: This report explores feasibility of an anticipatory precrash restraint sensor. The foundation principle is the anticipation mechanism found at a primitive level of biological intelligence and originally formalized by the mathematical biologist Robert Rosen. A system based on formal anticipatory principles should significantly outperform conventional technologies. It offers the prospect of high payoff in prevention of death and injury. Sensors and processes are available to provide a good, fast, and inexpensive description of the present dynamical state of the vehicle to the embedded system model in the anticipation engine. The experimental part of this study found that inexpensive radar in a real-world setting does return useful data on target dynamics. The data produced by a radar system can be converted to target dynamical information by good, fast and inexpensive signal-processing techniques. Not only is the anticipatory sensor feasible, but further development under the sponsorship of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is necessary and desirable. There are a number of possible lines of follow-on investigation. The level of effort and expected benefits of various alternatives are discussed.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Kercel, S.W. & Dress, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A hardware implementation of multiresolution filtering for broadband instrumentation

Description: The authors have constructed a wavelet processing board that implements a 14-level wavelet transform. The board uses a high-speed, analog-to-digital (A/D) converter, a hardware queue, and five fixed-point digital signal processing (DSP) chips in a parallel pipeline architecture. All five processors are independently programmable. The board is designed as a general purpose engine for instrumentation applications requiring near real-time wavelet processing or multiscale filtering. The present application is the processing engine of a magnetic field monitor that covers 305 Hz through 5 MHz. The monitor is used for the detection of peak values of magnetic fields in nuclear power plants. This paper describes the design, development, simulation, and testing of the system. Specific issues include the conditioning of real-world signals for wavelet processing, practical trade-offs between queue length and filter length, selection of filter coefficients, simulation of a 14-octave filter bank, and limitations imposed by a fixed-point processor. Test results from the completed wavelet board are included.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Kercel, S. W. & Dress, W. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

Description: The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.
Date: April 25, 1999
Creator: Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O. & Kercel, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

Description: The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.
Date: April 5, 1999
Creator: Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B., Jr.; Hylton, J.O. & Kercel, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of the neutron magnetic moment

Description: The neutron magnetic moment has been measured with an improvement of a factor of 100 over the previous best measurement. Using a magnetic resonance spectrometer of the separated oscillatory field type capable of determining a resonance signal for both neutrons and protons (in flowing H/sub 2/O), we find ..mu../sub n//..mu../sub p/ = 0.68497935(17) (0.25 ppM). The neutron magnetic moment can also be expressed without loss of accuracy in a variety of other units.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Greene, G.L.; Ramsey, N.F.; Mampe, W.; Pendlebury, J.M.; Smith, K.; Dress, W.B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of the smart portal in transportation

Description: Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developed a ``Portal-of-the-Future``, or ``smart portal``. This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiogram, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Dress, W.B.; Hickerson, T.W.; Jatko, W.B.; Labaj, L.E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department