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Incorporating pollution into US Department of Energy design projects: Case study results and participant feedback

Description: Pollution prevention seeks to eliminate the release of all pollutants (hazardous and non-hazardous) to all media (land, air, and water). Beyond eliminating pollution at the source, pollution prevention includes energy conservation, water conservation, and protection of natural resources. Therefore, pollution prevention addresses not only wastes exiting a process, but materials entering and being consumed by the process as well. Historically, pollution prevention activities within the US Department of Energy (DOE) have focused on existing process waste streams -- the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) being the central tool for identifying and implementing pollution prevention opportunities. However, it is estimated that 70% of a product`s total lifecycle cost is fixed by design (i.e., before the product, process, or facility ever gets built). By moving pollution prevention upstream into design, new opportunities emerge for minimizing waste not only during operations, but during construction and dismantlement of a facility as well. This is significant because it is estimated that the environmental consequences from construction of a building are comparable to a decade of operating the building, and demolition creates even more waste than construction.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Dorsey, J.A.; Greitzer, F.L. & Raney, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention electronic design guideline: A tool for identifying pollution prevention in facility design

Description: The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a tool to assist in incorporating pollution prevention opportunities into the design of federal facilities. The Pollution Prevention Environmental Design Guide for Engineers (P2-EDGE) was developed for the US Department of Energy (prior to its release this summer it had been referred to as the P2 electronic design guideline. P2-EDGE contains a database of 267 opportunities intended to help a decisionmaker (designer, engineer, or project manager) evaluate the applicability and potential benefits of implementing pollution prevention in a particular project. The P2-EDGE database was derived from both DOE and non-DOE sources including pollution prevention literature, industrial design personnel, and federal, state, and DOE sources. A key feature of the tool is the integration of photos, illustrations, and documentation to provide easy access to technical information on specific waste minimization opportunities in design.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Greitzer, F.L.; Brown, B.W.; Dorsey, J.A. & Raney, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A tool for promoting pollution prevention in facility design

Description: The Pacific Northwest Laboratory{sup (a)} has developed a tool to assist in incorporating pollution prevention opportunities into the design of federal facilities. The pollution prevention electronic design guideline (EDG), developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), contains a database of 267 opportunities intended to help a decisionmaker (designer, engineer, or project manager) evaluate the applicability and potential benefits of implementing pollution prevention in a particular project. The EDG`s database was derived from both DOE and non-DOE sources including pollution prevention literature, industrial design personnel, and federal, state, and DOE sources. A key feature of the tool is the integration of photos, illustrations, and documentation to provide easy access to technical information on specific waste minimization opportunities in design. This paper describes the software tool, the Pollution Prevention Electronic Design Guideline (EDG). The EDG runs on a personal computer within the Microsoft Windows environment. The EDG is used with the P2DA Guidance Manual on a project-by-project basis. The P2DA process is analogous to the Waste Minimization Assessment method established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for existing process waste streams. The EDG is introduced during the stage of the P2DA when design alternatives are being explored (after the anticipated waste streams have been quantified). As such, the EDG database is not exhaustive, and it is not computational (i.e., it does not compute the lifecycle impacts of implementation). Its purpose is to raise awareness of existing technologies and design practices that can improve resource efficiency or decrease waste generation over the entire life of the project (construction, operation, and decommissioning), and to provide a template for the documentation. Because design is an iterative process, the EDG is also intended to be revisited with each successive design stage.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Greitzer, F.L.; Brown, B.W. & Dorsey, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design

Description: This material was developed to assist engineers in incorporating pollution prevention into the design of new or modified facilities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The material demonstrates how the design of a facility can affect the generation of waste throughout a facility`s entire life and it offers guidance on how to prevent the generation of waste during design. Contents include: Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design training course booklet; Pollution prevention design guideline; Orientation to pollution prevention for facility design lesson plan; Training participant survey and pretest; and Training facilitator`s guide and schedule.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Raney, E. A.; Whitehead, J. K.; Encke, D. B. & Dorsey, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A tool for designing pollution prevention into US Department of Energy facilities

Description: Historically, pollution prevention activities within the Department of Energy (DOE) have focused on existing process waste streams. However, the DOE estimates that 70 percent of the opportunity to reduce or eliminate pollutants is gained or lost during design. Design is considered a critical component of the DOE`s operations, products and services, as evidenced by the numerous new facilities planned to support the cleanup mission of the complex. Pollution prevention during design: (a) significantly reduces the potential generation of waste and environmental releases, (b) promotes the use of energy efficient materials, (c) minimizes resource consumption, and (d) lowers life-cycle costs. Life-cycle cost considerations during design can include construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of the facility. This paper highlights: (1) the development of the guideline, including specific examples of the guideline`s content and intended use, (2) a discussion on the philosophy and content of the training module, (3) a strategy for integrating the guideline`s use into the existing DOE design process, and (4) future plans for enhancing the guideline and training class while continuing to integrate pollution prevention into the DOE design process.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Dorsey, J. A.; Raney, E. A. & Whitehead, J. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pollution prevention training for facility designers

Description: An Orientation to Pollution Prevention for Facility Design training course was developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Waste Minimization Division. The 3-hour course will be offered at the Hanford Quality Training and Resource Center beginning Summer, 1994. The course, intended for design engineers and project managers, contains two modules. The first module defines pollution prevention using actual success stories to illustrate pollution prevention concepts, benefits, and their relationship to design. The second module presents a newly developed job aid, the Pollution Prevention Design Guideline. The main challenges of developing the course were to present the material in a manner that participants would want to design for pollution prevention, and provide tools so that participants could design for pollution prevention. As such, the course is very interactive and uses a variety of presentation techniques. Participants are challenged to discuss the course materials in the context of their own design projects, and they practice using their new knowledge on an actual design project. The biggest measure of the course`s success is the extent to which the participants bring the materials back to their work place. An attitudinal survey and a knowledge-based questionnaire are administered before and after the course in order to gage this.
Date: May 1, 1994
Creator: Dorsey, J. A.; Raney, E. A. & Whitehead, J. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An electronic design guideline for incorporating pollution prevention into U.S. Department of Energy design projects

Description: The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a prototype pollution prevention electronic design guideline (EDG) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Waste Minimization Division (EM-334). The EDG contains a database of 267 opportunities to incorporate pollution prevention features into DOE design projects. Each opportunity provides supporting data that help the decisionmaker (designers, engineers, and project managers) evaluate the applicability and potential benefits of implementing pollution prevention in their particular project. The EDG`s database was derived from both DOE and non-DOE sources including pollution prevention literature, industrial design personnel, and federal, state, and DOE sources. A key feature of the tool is the integration of photos, illustrations, and documentation to provide easy access to technical information on specific waste minimization opportunities in design. Historically, pollution prevention activities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have focused on existing process waste streams. However, it is estimated that 70% of the cost over the life of a product is fixed by design (i.e., before the product is constructed or used). In recognition of this pollution prevention opportunity, the DOE has funded the Hanford Site to incorporate it into the design of new products, processes, and facilities across the complex. Hanford Site contractors are now beginning their third year of leading this activity for DOE Headquarters (HQ).
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Greitzer, F.L.; Brown, B.W.; Dorsey, J.A.; Stitzel, J.C. & Raney, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department