9 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium sharing existing facilities at Hanford with pit disassembly {ampersand} conversion facility: alternative 2

Description: The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium as a ceramic in an existing facility at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), which is being costed in a separate report will also be located in the FMEF in this co- location option. The technical engineering data used as the basis for this study is presented in the EIS Data Call Input Report, `Plutonium Immobilization Plant Using Ceramic in Existing Facilities at Hanford.` The FMEF will require minimal facility modifications to accommodate the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). Adequate space is available within the FMEF for installation of the immobilization process equipment. Facility HVAC, utility, and support systems exist to support the immobilization operations. Building modifications are primarily the removal of the SAF line (gloveboxes and support equipment) on the 70` level and building interior changes. The plutonium immobilization equipment will primarily occupy the 42` and 70` levels of the FMEF, with the same equipment layout as in the sole occupancy case. The Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility would occupy the 21` and O` (Entry) levels. Elements of the FMEF and adjacent Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) that will be shared by PIP and PDCF include shipping and receiving, laboratory, waste handling, security, offices, maintenance shops, SNM storage vault, and utilities. It was assumed that the existing utilities and support systems are adequate or only need minor upgrades to support both the PIP and PDCF. The PIP cost estimate was reconciled with the PDCF cost estimate to confirm the use and costs of shared systems and personnel. The facility design for a 50 metric ton plutonium throughput plant will be used for the 18.2 metric ton ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: DiSabatino, A., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium immobilization plant using glass in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

Description: The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a glass immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: DiSabatino, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium immobilization plant using glass in existing facilities at the Savannah River Site

Description: The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a glass immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: DiSabatino, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EIS Data Call Report: Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

Description: The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: DiSabatino, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Review Report for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Model 9977 S-SARP-G-00001 Revision 2

Description: This Technical Review Report (TRR) summarizes the review findings for the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Model 9977 B(M)F-96 shipping container. The content analyzed for this submittal is Content Envelope C.1, Heat Sources, in assemblies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators or food-pack cans. The SARP under review, i.e., S-SARP-G-00001, Revision 2 (August 2007), was originally referred to as the General Purpose Fissile Material Package. The review presented in this TRR was performed using the methods outlined in Revision 3 of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Packaging Review Guide (PRG) for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packages. The format of the SARP follows that specified in Revision 2 of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's, Regulatory Guide 7.9, i.e., Standard Format and Content of Part 71 Applications for Approval of Packages for Radioactive Material. Although the two documents are similar in their content, they are not identical. Formatting differences have been noted in this TRR, where appropriate. The Model 9977 Package is a 35-gallon drum package design that has evolved from a family of packages designed by DOE contractors at the Savannah River Site. The Model 9977 Package design includes a single, 6-inch diameter, stainless steel pressure vessel containment system (i.e., the 6CV) that was designed and fabricated in accordance with Section III, Subsection NB, of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code. The earlier package designs, i.e., the Model 9965, 9966, 9967 and 9968 Packages, were originally designed and certified in the 1980s. In the 1990s, updated package designs that incorporated design features consistent with new safety requirements, based on International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines, were proposed. The updated package designs were the Model 9972, 9973, 9974 and 9975 Packages, respectively. The Model 9975 Package was certified by the Packaging Certification Program, under the Office of ...
Date: October 4, 2007
Creator: DiSabatino, A; Hafner, R & West, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical Review Report for the Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum No. 1, through Revision b

Description: This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the 'Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Addendum No. 1, Revision b', dated May 2007 (Addendum 1). The Mound 1KW Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) number USA/9516/B(U)F-85 for the transportation of Type B quantities of plutonium heat source material. The safety analysis of the package is documented in the 'Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1KW Package' (i.e., the Mound 1KW SARP, or the SARP). Addendum 1 incorporates a new fueled capsule assembly payload. The following changes have been made to add this payload: (1) The primary containment vessel (PCV) will be of the same design, but will increase in height to 11.16 in.; (2) A new graphite support block will be added to support up to three fueled capsule assemblies per package; (3) The cutting groove height on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) will be heightened to accommodate the taller PCV; and (4) A 3.38 in. high graphite filler block will be placed on top of the PCV. All other packaging features, as described in the Mound 1KW SARP [3], remain unchanged. This report documents the LLNL review of Addendum 1[1]. The specific review for each SARP Chapter is documented herein.
Date: October 4, 2007
Creator: DiSabatino, A; West, M; Hafner, R & Russell, E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design-Only Conceptual Design Report: Plutonium Immobilization Plant

Description: This design-only conceptual design report was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition for engineering and design of the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will be used to immobilize up to 50 tonnes of surplus plutonium. The siting for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant will be determined pursuant to the site-specific Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement in a Plutonium Deposition Record of Decision in early 1999. This document reflects a new facility using the preferred technology (ceramic immobilization using the can-in-canister approach) and the preferred site (at Savannah River). The Plutonium Immobilization Plant accepts plutonium from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into mineral-like forms that are subsequently encapsulated within a large canister of high-level waste glass. The final immobilized product must make the plutonium as inherently unattractive and inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors and must be suitable for geologic disposal. Plutonium immobilization at the Savannah River Site uses: (1) A new building, the Plutonium Immobilization Plant, which will convert non-pit surplus plutonium to an oxide form suitable for the immobilization process, immobilize plutonium in a titanate-based ceramic form, place cans of the plutonium-ceramic forms into magazines, and load the magazines into a canister; (2) The existing Defense Waste Processing Facility for the pouring of high-level waste glass into the canisters; and (3) The Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility to receive and store feed materials. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant uses existing Savannah River Site infra-structure for analytical laboratory services, waste handling, fire protection, training, and other support utilities and services. The Plutonium Immobilization Plant may share the disposition of the 50 tonnes of plutonium with the mixed oxide fuel/reactor disposition alternative. For this ...
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: DiSabatino, A. & Loftus, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

Description: The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D&T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D&T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D&T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency.
Date: March 7, 2000
Creator: Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A. & Mitchell, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY2001 Final Report Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Advanced Nuclear Fuel Design in the Future Nuclear Energy Market

Description: This study is to research the maturity of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding technology and to explore the suitability of existing technology for addressing the emerging requirements for Generation IV reactors and emerging thermal/fast spectrum reactors, while simultaneously addressing nuclear waste management, and proliferation resistance concerns.
Date: September 30, 2001
Creator: Christensen, D.; Choi, J.-S.; DiSabatino, A. & Wirth, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department