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Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grapes

Description: Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Date: 1947
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Home Uses for Muscadine Grapes

Description: "In the following pages, directions for preparing a large number of Muscadine grape products are given.... It is not asserted that these recipes can in no case be improved upon or that they represent the only desirable Muscadine grape products. It is recommended that the housekeeper who can obtain these grapes use this publication merely as a suggestive guide and exercise her ingenuity to devise additional useful methods of preparation." -- p. 2. Recipes are given for grape syrups, juice, jelly, canned grapes, spiced grapes, catsup, preserves, jam, marmalade, and mincemeat.
Date: 1917
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grape Paste

Description: "Muscadine grape paste is an economical, appetizing, and nutritious sugar-saving substitute for candy and other confections. It is excellent in combination with cheese, and especially with cottage cheese, as a substitute for the salad course or for a dessert. It may be made from the fresh fruit or preferably from the pulp of pomace left from grape juice and jelly making. It may be made with grape sirup or corn sirup instead of sugar. The pulp may be canned and the paste made at any convenient time or when desired for use. The making of muscadine grape paste is recommended for home use, but it may be made profitably for market where grapes are abundant. This bulletin gives directions for securing suitable fruit, the extraction of the pulp, and the sweetening, cooking, drying, and storing of the product, as well as the making of various combinations, fancy pastes, and pastes from other fruits." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grape Paste

Description: Revised edition. "Muscadine grape paste is an economical, appetizing, and nutritious sugar-saving substitute for candy and other confections. It is excellent in combination with cheese, and especially with cottage cheese, as a substitute for the salad course or for a dessert. It may be made from the fresh fruit or preferably from the pulp of pomace left from grape juice and jelly making. It may be made with grape sirup or corn sirup instead of sugar. The pulp may be canned and the paste made at any convenient time or when desired for use. The making of muscadine grape paste is recommended for home use, but it may be made profitably for market where grapes are abundant. This bulletin gives directions for securing suitable fruit, the extraction of the pulp, and the sweetening, cooking, drying, and storing of the product, as well as the making of various combinations, fancy pastes, and pastes from other fruits." -- p. 2
Date: 1921
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department