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Optimization of signal extraction and front-end design in a fast,multigap ionization chamber

Description: This paper discusses the criteria that have been adopted tooptimize the signal processing in a shower detector to be employed as LHCbeam luminosity monitor. The original aspect ofthis instrument is itsablility to operate on a bunch-by-bunch basis. This means that it mustperform accurate charge measurements at a repetition rate of 40 MHz. Thedetector must withstand an integrated dose of 100 Grad, that is, two tothree orders of magnitude beyond those expected in the experiments. Tomeet the above requirements, an ionization chamber consisting of severalgaps of thickness 0.5 mm, filled with a gas that is expected to beradiation resistant, has been designed. Crucial in the development of thesystem is the signal processing, as the electronic noise may set thedominant limitation to the accuracy of the measurement. This is relatedto two aspects. One is the short time available for the chargemeasurement. The second one is the presence of a few meter cable betweenthe detector and the preamplifier, as this must be located out of theregion of highest radiation field. Therefore the optimization of thesignal-to-noise ratio requires that the best configuration of the chambergaps be determined under the constraint of the presence of a cable ofnon-negligible length between detector and preamplifier. The remoteplacement of the amplifying electronics will require that the front-endelectronics be radiation hard although to a lesser extent than thedetector.
Date: November 5, 2001
Creator: Datte, P.S.; Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Placidi, M.; Ratti,L.; Speziali, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC Luminosity Monitor

Description: The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~;;235W at design luminosity 1034cm-2s-1). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/ electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desired statistical accuracy is obtained. At design luminosity approximately 2x103 bunch crossings will suffice for a 1percent luminosity measurement. In this paper we report the first experimental results of the ionization chamber and analog electronics. Single 450GeV protons from the SPS at CERN are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC.
Date: October 1, 2000
Creator: Speziali, V.; Beche, J.F.; Burks, M.T.; Datte, P.S.; Haguenauer, M.; manfredi, P.F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The readout of the LHC beam luminosity monitor: Accurate shower energy measurements at a 40 MHz repetition rate

Description: The LHC beam luminosity monitor is based on the following principle. The neutrals that originate in LHC at every PP interaction create showers in the absorbers placed in front of the cryogenic separation dipoles. The shower energy, as it can be measured by suitable detectors in the absorbers is proportional to the number of neutral particles and, therefore, to the luminosity. This principle lends itself to a luminosity measurement on a bunch-by-bunch basis. However, detector and front-end electronics must comply with extremely stringent requirements. To make the bunch-by-bunch measurement feasible, their speed of operation must match the 40 MHz bunch repetition rate of LHC. Besides, in the actual operation the detector must stand extremely high radiation doses. The front-end electronics, to survive, must be located at some distance from the region of high radiation field, which means that a properly terminated, low-noise, cable connection is needed between detector and front-end electronics. After briefly reviewing the solutions that have been adopted for the detector and the front-end electronics and the results that have been obtained so far in tests on the beam, the latest version of the instrument in describe in detail. It will be shown how a clever detector design, a suitable front-end conception based on the use of a ''cold resistance'' cable termination and a careful low-noise design, along with the use of an effective deconvolution algorithm, make the luminosity measurement possible on a bunch-by-bunch basis at the LHC bunch repetition rates.
Date: May 10, 2003
Creator: Manfredi, P.F.; Ratti, L.; Speziali, V.; Traversi, G.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a detector for bunch by bunch measurement and optimization of luminosity in the LHC

Description: The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the LHC each absorb approximately 1.8TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction ({approximately}235W at design luminosity 1034cm-2s-1). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. Novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chambers are proposed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/ electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with state of the art low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desired statistical accuracy is obtained. At design luminosity approximately 2x103 bunch crossings suffice for a 1% luminosity measurement.
Date: May 19, 2000
Creator: Turner, W.C.; Burks, M.T.; Datte, P.S.; Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Mokhov, N.V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department