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High Energy Neutrinos from the Cold: Status and Prospects of the IceCube Experiment

Description: The primary motivation for building neutrino telescopes is to open the road for neutrino astronomy, and to offer another observational window for the study of cosmic ray origins. Other physics topics, such as the search for WIMPs, can also be developed with neutrino telescope. As of March 2008, the IceCube detector, with half of its strings deployed, is the world largest neutrino telescope taking data to date and it will reach its completion in 2011. Data taken with the growing detector are being analyzed. The results of some of these works are summarized here. AMANDA has been successfully integrated into IceCube data acquisition system and continues to accumulate data. Results obtained using only AMANDA data taken between the years 2000 and 2006 are also presented. The future of IceCube and the extensions in both low and high energy regions will finally be discussed in the last section.
Date: February 29, 2008
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Portello-Roucelle, Cecile & Collaboration, IceCube
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux and Searches for New Physics with AMANDA-II

Description: The AMANDA-II detector, operating since 2000 in the deep ice at the geographic South Pole, has accumulated a large sample of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the 100 GeV to 10 TeV energy range. The zenith angle and energy distribution of these events can be used to search for various phenomenological signatures of quantum gravity in the neutrino sector, such as violation of Lorentz invariance (VLI) or quantum decoherence (QD). Analyzing a set of 5511 candidate neutrino events collected during 1387 days of livetime from 2000 to 2006, we find no evidence for such effects and set upper limits on VLI and QD parameters using a maximum likelihood method. Given the absence of evidence for new flavor-changing physics, we use the same methodology to determine the conventional atmospheric muon neutrino flux above 100 GeV.
Date: June 2, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Klein, Spencer & Collaboration, IceCube
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The IceCube Collaboration:contributions to the 30 th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2007),

Description: This paper bundles 40 contributions by the IceCube collaboration that were submitted to the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference ICRC 2007. The articles cover studies on cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrinos, searches for non-localized, extraterrestrial {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}} signals, scans for steady and intermittent neutrino point sources, searches for dark matter candidates, magnetic monopoles and other exotic particles, improvements in analysis techniques, as well as future detector extensions. The IceCube observatory will be finalized in 2011 to form a cubic-kilometer ice-Cherenkov detector at the location of the geographic South Pole. At the present state of construction, IceCube consists of 52 paired IceTop surface tanks and 22 IceCube strings with a total of 1426 Digital Optical Modules deployed at depths up to 2350 m. The observatory also integrates the 19 string AMANDA subdetector, that was completed in 2000 and extends IceCube's reach to lower energies. Before the deployment of IceTop, cosmic air showers were registered with the 30 station SPASE-2 surface array. IceCube's low noise Digital Optical Modules are very reliable, show a uniform response and record waveforms of arriving photons that are resolvable with nanosecond precision over a large dynamic range. Data acquisition, reconstruction and simulation software are running in production mode and the analyses, profiting from the improved data quality and increased overall sensitivity, are well under way.
Date: November 2, 2007
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Ackermann, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FIRST NEUTRINO POINT-SOURCE RESULTS FROM THE 22-STRING ICECUBE DETECTOR

Description: We present new results of searches for neutrino point sources in the northern sky, using data recorded in 2007-08 with 22 strings of the IceCube detector (approximately one-fourth of the planned total) and 275.7 days of livetime. The final sample of 5114 neutrino candidate events agrees well with the expected background of atmospheric muon neutrinos and a small component of atmospheric muons. No evidence of a point source is found, with the most significant excess of events in the sky at 2.2 {sigma} after accounting for all trials. The average upper limit over the northern sky for point sources of muon-neutrinos with E{sup -2} spectrum is E{sup 2} {Phi}{sub {nu}{sub {mu}}} < 1.4 x 10{sup -1} TeV cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, in the energy range from 3 TeV to 3 PeV, improving the previous best average upper limit by the AMANDA-II detector by a factor of two.
Date: May 14, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Klein, Spencer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First search for extraterrestrial neutrino-induced cascades with IceCube

Description: We report on the first search for extraterrestrial neutrino-induced cascades in IceCube.The analyzed data were collected in the year 2007 when 22 detector strings were installed and operated. We will discuss the analysis methods used to reconstruct cascades and to suppress backgrounds. Simulated neutrino signal events with a E-2 energy spectrum, which pass the background rejection criteria, are reconstructed with a resolution Delta(log E) ~;; 0.27 in the energy range from ~;; 20 TeV to a few PeV. We present the range of the diffuse flux of extra-terrestrial neutrinos in the cascade channel in IceCube within which we expect to be able to put a limit.
Date: May 22, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Kiryluk, Joanna
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector

Description: A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the WIMP-proton cross-sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.
Date: April 28, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Klein, Spencer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the"naked-eye" GRB080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope

Description: We report on a search with the IceCube detector for high-energy muon neutrinos from GRB080319B, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed. The fireball model predicts that a mean of 0.12 events should be detected by IceCube for a bulk Lorentz boost of the jet of 300. In both the direct on-time window of 66 s and an extended window of about 300 s around the GRB, there was no excess found above the background. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the number of track-like events from the GRB is 2.7, corresponding to a muon neutrino fluence limit of 9.0 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} in the energy range between 145 TeV and 2.1 PeV, which contains 90% of the expected events.
Date: February 1, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Abbasi, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for Point Sources of High Energy Neutrinos with Final Data from AMANDA-II

Description: We present a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos using 3.8 years of data recorded by AMANDA-II during 2000-2006. After reconstructing muon tracks and applying selection criteria designed to optimally retain neutrino-induced events originating in the Northern Sky, we arrive at a sample of 6595 candidate events, predominantly from atmospheric neutrinos with primary energy 100 GeV to 8 TeV. Our search of this sample reveals no indications of a neutrino point source. We place the most stringent limits to date on E{sup -2} neutrino fluxes from points in the Northern Sky, with an average upper limit of E{sup 2}{Phi}{sub {nu}{sub {mu}}+{nu}{sub {tau}}} {le} 5.2 x 10{sup -11} TeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} on the sum of {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}} fluxes, assumed equal, over the energy range from 1.9 TeV to 2.5 PeV.
Date: March 6, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Klein, Spencer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum on 13 December 2006 Determined by IceTop

Description: The IceTop air shower array now under construction at the South Pole as the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope (Achterberg et al. 2006) detected an unusual near-solar-minimum Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) after a solar flare on 13 December 2006. Beginning at 0220 UT, the 4B class flare occurred at solar coordinates S06 W24, accompanied by strong (X3.4) X-ray emission and type II and IV radio bursts. The LASCO coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft observed a halo CME launch from the Sun at {approx} 0225 UT with speed estimated to be {approx} 1770 km/s. We have begun (Bieber et al. 2007) a comprehensive analysis of the propagation of solar energetic particles in this event. However the focus of this Letter is the new and unique ability of IceTop to derive the energy spectrum of these particles in the multi-GeV regime from a single detector with a well defined viewing direction. When completed, IceTop will have approximately 500 square meters of ice Cherenkov collecting area arranged in an array of 80 stations on a 125 m triangular grid to detect air showers from one PeV to one EeV. Each station consists of two, two meter diameter tanks filled with ice to a depth of 90 cm. Tanks are instrumented with two Digital Optical Modules (DOM) operated at different gain settings to provide appropriate dynamic range to cover both large and small air showers. Each DOM contains a 10 inch photomultiplier and an advanced readout system capable of digitizing the full waveform. For historical reasons, the two discriminator counting rates recorded in each DOM are termed SPE (Single Photo Electron), and MPE (Multi Photo Electron). In the present analysis the SPE threshold corresponds approximately to 20 photoelectrons (PE), and the MPE threshold to 100 PE. Due to the high altitude (2835m) ...
Date: October 11, 2008
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Klein, Spencer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector

Description: The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.
Date: May 11, 2010
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Abbasi, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extending the search for neutrino point sources with IceCube above the horizon

Description: Point source searches with the IceCube neutrino telescope have been restricted to one hemisphere, due to the exclusive selection of upward going events as a way of rejecting the atmospheric muon background. We show that the region above the horizon can be included by suppressing the background through energy-sensitive cuts. This approach improves the sensitivity above PeV energies, previously not accessible for declinations of more than a few degrees below the horizon due to the absorption of neutrinos in Earth. We present results based on data collected with 22 strings of IceCube, extending its field of view and energy reach for point source searches. No significant excess above the atmospheric background is observed in a sky scan and in tests of source candidates. Upper limits are reported, which for the first time cover point sources in the southern sky up to EeV energies.
Date: November 20, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope

Description: We present the results of searches for high-energy muon neutrinos from 41 gamma- ray bursts (GRBs) in the northern sky with the IceCube detector in its 22-string con-figuration active in 2007/2008. The searches cover both the prompt and a possible precursor emission as well as a model-independent, wide time window of -1 h to +3 haround each GRB. In contrast to previous searches with a large GRB population, we do not utilize a standard Waxman?Bahcall GRB flux for the prompt emission but calcu- late individual neutrino spectra for all 41 GRBs from the burst parameters measured by satellites. For all three time windows the best estimate for the number of signal events is zero. Therefore, we place 90percent CL upper limits on the fluence from the prompt phase of 3.7 x 10-3 erg cm-2 (72TeV - 6.5 PeV) and on the fluence from the precursor phase of 2.3 x 10-3 erg cm-2 (2.2TeV - 55TeV), where the quoted energy ranges contain 90percent of the expected signal events in the detector. The 90percent CL upper limit for the wide time window is 2.7 x 10-3 erg cm-2 (3TeV - 2.8 PeV) assuming an E-2 flux.
Date: January 19, 2010
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Abbasi, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

Description: We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.
Date: June 4, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Klein, Spencer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MEASUREMENT OF THE ANISOTROPY OF COSMIC RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS WITH ICECUBE

Description: We report the first observation of an anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays with energies in the multi TeV region in the Southern sky using data from the IceCube detector. Between June 2007 and March 2008, the partially-deployed IceCube detector was operated in a configuration with 1320 digital optical sensors distributed over 22 strings at depths between 1450 and 2450 meters inside the Antarctic ice. IceCube is a neutrino detector, but the data are dominated by a large background of cosmic ray muons. Therefore, the background data are suitable for high-statistics studies of cosmic rays in the Southern sky. The data include 4.3 billion muons produced by downgoing cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere; these events were reconstructed with a median angular resolution of 3 degrees and a median energy of ~;; 20 TeV. Their arrival direction distribution exhibits an anisotropy in right ascension with a first harmonic amplitude of (6.4 +- 0.2 stat. +- 0.8 syst.) x 10-4.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Abbasi, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-year search for a diffuse flxu of muon neutrinos with AMANDA-II

Description: A search for TeV-PeV muon neutrinos from unresolved sources was performed on AMANDA-II data collected between 2000 and 2003 with an equivalent livetime of 807 days. This diffuse analysis sought to find an extraterrestrial neutrino flux from sources with non-thermal components. The signal is expected to have a harder spectrum than the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds. Since no excess of events was seen in the data over the expected background, an upper limit of E{sup 2}{Phi}{sub 90%C.L.} < 7.4 x 10{sup -8} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} is placed on the diffuse flux of muon neutrinos with a {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2} spectrum in the energy range 16 TeV to 2.5 PeV. This is currently the most sensitive {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2} diffuse astrophysical neutrino limit. We also set upper limits for astrophysical and prompt neutrino models, all of which have spectra different than {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2}.
Date: April 13, 2008
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Klein, Spencer; Achterberg, A. & Collaboration, IceCube
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutrino Physics with the IceCube Detector

Description: IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino telescope under construction at the South Pole.The primary goal is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos.We describe the detector and present results on atmospheric muon neutrinos from2006 data collected with nine detector strings.
Date: June 11, 2008
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Kiryluk, Joanna & Kiryluk, Joanna
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection of Atmospheric Muon Neutrinoswith the IceCube 9-String Detector

Description: The IceCube neutrino detector is a cubic kilometer TeV to PeV neutrino detector under construction at the geographic South Pole. The dominant population of neutrinos detected in IceCube is due to meson decay in cosmic-ray air showers. These atmospheric neutrinos are relatively well understood and serve as a calibration and verification tool for the new detector. In 2006, the detector was approximately 10% completed, and we report on data acquired from the detector in this configuration. We observe an atmospheric neutrino signal consistent with expectations, demonstrating that the IceCube detector is capable of identifying neutrino events. In the first 137.4 days of livetime, 234 neutrino candidates were selected with an expectation of 211 {+-} 76.1(syst.) {+-} 14.5(stat.) events from atmospheric neutrinos.
Date: May 12, 2007
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Klein, Spencer & Achterberg, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern HemisphereGamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA

Description: We present the results of the analysis of neutrino observations by the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) correlated with photon observations of more than 400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the Northern Hemisphere from 1997 to 2003. During this time period, AMANDA's effective collection area for muon neutrinos was larger than that of any other existing detector. Based on our observations of zero neutrinos during and immediately prior to the GRBs in the dataset, we set the most stringent upper limit on muon neutrino emission correlated with gamma-ray bursts. Assuming a Waxman-Bahcall spectrum and incorporating all systematic uncertainties, our flux upper limit has a normalization at 1 PeV of E{sup 2}{Phi}{sub {nu}} {le} 6.0 x 10{sup -9} GeV cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}sr{sup -1}, with 90% of the events expected within the energy range of {approx}10 TeV to {approx}3 PeV. The impact of this limit on several theoretical models of GRBs is discussed, as well as the future potential for detection of GRBs by next generation neutrino telescopes. Finally, we briefly describe several modifications to this analysis in order to apply it to other types of transient point sources.
Date: May 8, 2007
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Klein, Spencer & Achterberg, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for Ultra High-Energy Neutrinos with AMANDA-II

Description: A search for diffuse neutrinos with energies in excess of 10{sup 5} GeV is conducted with AMANDA-II data recorded between 2000 and 2002. Above 10{sup 7} GeV, the Earth is essentially opaque to neutrinos. This fact, combined with the limited overburden of the AMANDA-II detector (roughly 1.5 km), concentrates these ultra high-energy neutrinos at the horizon. The primary background for this analysis is bundles of downgoing, high-energy muons from the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere. No statistically significant excess above the expected background is seen in the data, and an upper limit is set on the diffuse all-flavor neutrino flux of E{sup 2} {Phi}{sub 90%CL} < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} GeV cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} valid over the energy range of 2 x 10{sup 5} GeV to 10{sup 9} GeV. A number of models which predict neutrino fluxes from active galactic nuclei are excluded at the 90% confidence level.
Date: November 19, 2007
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Klein, Spencer & Ackermann, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent vs from IceCube

Description: IceCube is a 1 km3 neutrino detector now being built at the South Pole. Its 4800 optical modules will detect Cherenkov radiation from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. IceCube will search for neutrinos of astrophysical origin, with energies from 100 GeV up to 1019 eV. It will be able to separate nue, nu mu and nu tau. In addition to detecting astrophysical neutrinos, IceCube will also search for neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun and the Earth, look for low-energy (10 MeV) neutrinos from supernovae, and search for a host of exotic signatures. With the associated IceTop surface air shower array, it will study cosmic-ray air showers. IceCube construction is now 50percent complete. After presenting preliminary results from the partial detector, I will discuss IceCube's future plans.
Date: October 3, 2008
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube & Klein, Spencer R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of High pT Muons in IceCube

Description: Muons with a high transverse momentum (p{sub T}) are produced in cosmic ray air showers via semileptonic decay of heavy quarks and the decay of high p{sub T} kaons and pions. These high p{sub T} muons have a large lateral separation from the shower core muon bundle. IceCube is well suited for the detection of high p{sub T} muons. The surface shower array can determine the energy, core location and direction of the cosmic ray air shower while the in-ice array can reconstruct the energy and direction of the high p{sub T} muon. This makes it possible to measure the decoherence function (lateral separation spectrum) at distances greater than 150 meters. The muon p{sub T} can be determined from the muon energy (measured by dE/dx) and the lateral separation. The high p{sub T} muon spectrum may also be calculated in a perturbative QCD framework; this spectrum is sensitive to the cosmic-ray composition.
Date: June 1, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Gerhardt, Lisa & Klein, Spencer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

Description: Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5,160 optical sensors are embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system, including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems and LEDs for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams.
Date: June 4, 2010
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Halzen, F. & Klein, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector

Description: A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) WIMPs in the Sun and converted to limits on the LKP-proton cross-sections for LKP masses in the range 250 - 3000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on LKP annihilation in the Sun.
Date: October 23, 2009
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Abbasi, R. & al., et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration and Characterization of the IceCube Photomultiplier Tube

Description: Over 5,000 PMTs are being deployed at the South Pole to compose the IceCube neutrino observatory. Many are placed deep in the ice to detect Cherenkov light emitted by the products of high-energy neutrino interactions, and others are frozen into tanks on the surface to detect particles from atmospheric cosmic ray showers. IceCube is using the 10-inch diameter R7081-02 made by Hamamatsu Photonics. This paper describes the laboratory characterization and calibration of these PMTs before deployment. PMTs were illuminated with pulses ranging from single photons to saturation level. Parameterizations are given for the single photoelectron charge spectrum and the saturation behavior. Time resolution, late pulses and afterpulses are characterized. Because the PMTs are relatively large, the cathode sensitivity uniformity was measured. The absolute photon detection efficiency was calibrated using Rayleigh-scattered photons from a nitrogen laser. Measured characteristics are discussed in the context of their relevance to IceCube event reconstruction and simulation efforts.
Date: February 11, 2010
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Abbasi, R. & al., et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department