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Nitrogen oxide emissions from coal fired MHD plants

Description: In this topical report, the nitrogen oxide emission issues from a coal fired MHD steam combined cycle power plant are summarized, both from an experimental and theoretical/calculational viewpoint. The concept of staging the coal combustion to minimize NO{sub x} is described. The impact of NO{sub x} control design choices on electrical conductivity and overall plant efficiency are described. The results of the NO{sub x} measurements in over 3,000 hours of coal fired testing are summarized. A chemical kinetics model that was used to model the nooks decomposition is described. Finally, optimum design choices for a low nooks plant are discussed and it is shown that the MHD Steam Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant can be designed to operate with nooks emissions less than 0.05 lbm/MMBTU.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Chapman, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

Description: The purpose of this report is to calculate the cost of producing high temperature superconducting wire by the Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) process. The technology status is reviewed from the literature and a plant conceptual design is assumed for the cost calculation. The critical issues discussed are the high cost of the metal organic precursors, the material utilization efficiency and the capability of the final product as measured by the critical current density achieved. Capital, operating and material costs are estimated and summed as the basis for calculating the cost per unit length of wire. Sensitivity analyses of key assumptions are examined to determine their effects on the final wire cost. Additionally, the cost of wire on the basis of cost per kiloampere per meter is calculated for operation at lower temperatures than the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature. It is concluded that this process should not be ruled out on the basis of high cost of precursors alone.
Date: July 13, 1999
Creator: Chapman, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by electron beam and pulsed laser deposition systems

Description: The results of this study establish a framework for evaluation of the cost impact of many performance parameters in coated conductor manufacturing systems. Since the cost and concepts are based on early developmental results and engineering judgment, the study should be updated periodically based on latest data to enhance its usefulness. The study should be expanded to include other promising processes under consideration or development for manufacture of coated conductors. Review of this study by as wide a group of experts from industry, national laboratories and universities as possible is desirable to facilitate improving accuracy of the estimates and communication on the issues involved. The results for the case of achieving the $10/kA-m goal at a J{sub c} of 10{sup 5} a/cm{sup 2} applicable to applications requiring a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of current flow may be viewed as somewhat discouraging. However, there is ample margin for improvement due to continued development and engineering that could enable meeting the goal of $10/kA-m.
Date: April 14, 1999
Creator: Chapman, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

Description: The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8--20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Chapman, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UTSI/CFFF MHD program completion and related activities

Description: Maintenance work on the DOE CFFF facility remained in suspension for the entire quarter in accordance with the stop work order issued the previous quarter. Work resumed on the environmental restoration activities during the quarter and work performed is summarized. Progress continued on the five (5) high temperature superconductivity projects under Task 6. On the sol-gel process, improvement is reported in application of buffer layers to single crystals. Problems are discussed in applying buffer layers to nickel substrates. The status of cost performance studies is summarized. The status of diagnostic measurements directed toward real time control of manufacturing processes is reported with emphasis on measurement of surface smoothness. The results of atomic absorption measurement of MOCVD precursors are reported.
Date: April 30, 1999
Creator: Muehlhauser, J.W. & Chapman, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of the remote-handled transuranic waste radioassay data quality objectives. An evaluation of RH-TRU waste inventories, characteristics, radioassay methods and capabilities

Description: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will accept remote-handled transuranic waste as early as October of 2001. Several tasks must be accomplished to meet this schedule, one of which is the development of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) and corresponding Quality Assurance Objectives (QAOs) for the assay of radioisotopes in RH-TRU waste. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was assigned the task of providing to the DOE QAO, information necessary to aide in the development of DQOs for the radioassay of RH-TRU waste. Consistent with the DQO process, information needed and presented in this report includes: identification of RH-TRU generator site radionuclide data that may have potential significance to the performance of the WIPP repository or transportation requirements; evaluation of existing methods to measure the identified isotopic and quantitative radionuclide data; evaluation of existing data as a function of site waste streams using documented site information on fuel burnup, radioisotope processing and reprocessing, special research and development activities, measurement collection efforts, and acceptable knowledge; and the current status of technologies and capabilities at site facilities for the identification and assay of radionuclides in RH-TRU waste streams. This report is intended to provide guidance in developing the RH-TRU waste radioassay DQOs, first by establishing a baseline from which to work, second, by identifying needs to fill in the gaps between what is known and achievable today and that which will be required before DQOs can be formulated, and third, by recommending measures that should be taken to assure that the DQOs in fact balance risk and cost with an achievable degree of certainty.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Meeks, A.M. & Chapman, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Groundwater chemistry at the Nevada Test Site: Data and preliminary interpretations

Description: The interpretation of chemical analyses of groundwater collected at and near the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been vital in developing conceptual models of groundwater flow in the area. These conceptual models are tested using recent chemical data generated by the Desert Research Institute, as well as historic analyses from the US Geological Survey. A total of 81 wells are represented by analyses from 1957 to 1990, with generally excellent agreement between repeat samples from the same location. As identified by previous workers, three hydrochemical facies are represented by the samples: Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3} water in carbonate rocks or alluvium derived from carbonates, Na-K-HCO{sub 3} water in volcanic rocks and alluvium derived from volcanic rocks, and a mixed fades found in many carbonate and alluvium water samples, and some volcanic waters. There is a general lack of lateral continuity in chemical characteristics along presumed flowpaths within each hydrologic unit (alluvium, carbonate, and volcanic). Though a lack of continuity between basins on the east side of the NTS was expected for water in alluvial and volcanic units due to the absence of interbasin flow, chemical differences observed within individual basins suggest a dominance of vertical over lateral flow. Groundwater in volcanic materials on the east side of Yucca and Frenchman Flats and on the west side of Pahute Mesa and Yucca Mountain has a nearly pure Na-K-HCO{sub 3} signature that reflects contact with primarily volcanic material. Groundwater in volcanic units in the middle of the NTS and on the east side of Pahute Mesa contains a higher proportion of Ca, Mg, Cl, and SO{sub 4} than the other volcanic waters and indicates the contribution of water from the upper carbonate aquifer and/or hydrothermally altered regions.
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Chapman, J.B. & Lyles, B.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exposure assessment of groundwater transport of tritium from the Shoal Site

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies are responsible for nuclear weapons research and development as part of the national defense program. These activities include underground nuclear testing, and a small number of such tests have been conducted at sites distant from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). An NTS site-wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared in 1995 and includes the two offsite test areas in Nevada: the Shoal site and the Central Nevada Test Area. At the time of these tests, evaluations of project safety and predictions of groundwater transport of contaminants were made, and the tests were deemed safe to the public. These early evaluations were not considered sufficient for the EIS, so DOE decided to perform a new exposure assessment for the Shoal site. The basic scenario evaluated for this exposure assessment is transport of tritium from the Shoal underground nuclear test by groundwater to a receptor well where an individual drinks the contaminated water for 70 years, centered around the time of peak tritium concentration. This scenario is entirely hypothetical because, as of 1995, there are no known occurrences of humans drinking water downgradient from the test. Four specific scenarios are analyzed because of uncertainty in flowpath direction. Two of these presume that wells are drilled at the boundary of the current DOE land withdrawal and are then used for drinking water supply. Wells do not currently exist at these locations and thus the resultant risks do not apply to any current populations; however, there are no controls to prevent such wells from being drilled in the future. The two other scenarios consider transport to the first existing wells along possible flowpaths. These wells are currently used only seasonally to water cattle, and as such, these risks also do not apply to ...
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Chapman, J.; Pohlmann, K. & Andricevic, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exposure assessment of groundwater transport of tritium from the Central Nevada Test Area

Description: This exposure assessment provides a range of possible human health risk at two locations due to groundwater transport from the Faultless underground nuclear test. These locations correspond to the boundary of the land under DOE control (where no wells currently exist) and the closest existing well (Six Mile Well). The range in excess risk is within the EPA goal for excess risk due to environmental contaminants (10{sup {minus}6}) at Six Mile Well. Calculations considering high spatial variability in hydraulic properties and/or high uncertainty in the mean groundwater velocity are also within the EPA goal. At the DOE boundary, the range in excess risk exceeds the EPA goal, regardless of the values of spatial variability and uncertainty. The range in values of excess risk can be reduced with additional field data from the site; however, incorporation of additional data, which would likely be obtained at great expense, is unlikely to result in significant refinement of the results.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Pohlmann, K.; Chapman, J. & Andricevic, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model

Description: Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are ...
Date: November 1, 2008
Creator: Hassan, A. & Chapman, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location ...
Date: April 1, 2008
Creator: Cooper, C.; Ye, M. & Chapman, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MHD plant turn down considerations

Description: The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Lineberry, J.T. & Chapman, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reverse primary-side flow in steam generators during natural circulation cooling

Description: A TRAC model of the Large Scale Test Facility with a 3-tube steam-generator model was used to analyze natural-circulation test ST-NC-02. For the steady state at 100% primary mass inventory, TRAC was in excellent agreement with the natural-circulation flow rate, the temperature distribution in the steam-generator tubes, and the temperature drop from the hot leg to the steam-generator inlet plenum. TRAC also predicted reverse flow in the long tubes. At reduced primary mass inventories, TRAC predicted the three natural-circulation flow regimes: single phase, two phase, and reflux condensation. TRAC did not predict the cyclic fill-and-dump phenomenon seen briefly in the test. TRAC overpredicted the two-phase natural-circulation flow rate. Since the core is well cooled at this time, the result is conservative. An important result of the analysis is that TRAC was able to predict the core dryout and heatup at approximately the same primary mass inventory as in the test. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Stumpf, H.; Motley, F.; Schultz, R.; Chapman, J. & Kukita, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using Uncertainty to Guide Characterization, Closure and Long-term Management of an Underground Nuclear Test Site

Description: No feasible remediation technology has been identified for nuclear test cavities such that site management and institutional controls must be relied on to minimize the possibility of public exposure to these legacies of the Cold War. The most common exposure pathway of concern is migration of radionuclides with groundwater. Prediction of flow and transport behavior in the sparsely observed subsurface environment is inherently uncertain, but developing effective management strategies demands such predictions. An agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Nevada provides a framework for addressing uncertainty in site management decisions. The central element of the framework is calculation of a predictive contaminant boundary at a specified confidence interval. This boundary is defined as a three-dimensional region encompassing all groundwater that contains radionuclides at concentrations higher than Safe Drinking Water Act limits at any time through a 1,000-year period, at a 95-percent confidence interval. In the process of predicting this boundary at the Shoal underground nuclear test site in rural Nevada, some interesting challenges were encountered. A stochastic groundwater flow and transport model was developed for the site using historic site data and information from four characterization wells drilled in 1996. Though the predicted mean transport plume was located within the existing site land boundary, uncertainty in the predictions was very large such that the 95-percent confidence interval extended beyond the site boundary. This level of uncertainty was unacceptable to DOE, prompting additional site characterization with the goal of reducing the uncertainty in contaminant migration predictions. The numerical groundwater flow model was used to identify the optimum data collection activities for uncertainty reduction. This Data Decision Analysis guided drilling and testing of additional wells. Significant revision occurred to the groundwater model as a result of the new data. The revised model was deemed acceptable by ...
Date: January 9, 2007
Creator: Chapman, J.; Pohll, G.; Hassan, A. & Pohlmann, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The pixel microtelescope

Description: We describe a vertex and/or tracking detector designed to operate in an environment in which there is a large density of background hits. 2 refs., 2 figs.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Chapman, J. & Geer, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration techniques for a fast duo-spectrometer

Description: The authors have completed the upgrade and calibration of the Ion Dynamics Spectrometer (IDS), a high-speed Doppler duo-spectrometer which measures ion flow and temperature in the MST Reversed-field Pinch. This paper describes an in situ calibration of the diagnostic`s phase and frequency response. A single clock was employed to generate both a digital test signal and a digitizer trigger thus avoiding frequency drift and providing a highly resolved measurement over the system bandwidth. Additionally, they review the measurement of the spectrometer instrument function and absolute intensity response. This calibration and subsequent performance demonstrate the IDS to be one of the fastest, highest throughput diagnostics of its kind. Typical measurements are presented.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Chapman, J.T. & Den Hartog, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rio Blanco underground nuclear test site, Colorado

Description: DOE is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater is part of preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations allow prioritization of test areas in terms of risk, provide a basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work, and provide a framework for assessing site characterization data needs. The Rio Blanco site in Colorado was the location of the simultaneous detonation of three 30-kiloton nuclear devices. The devices were located 1780, 1899, and 2039 below ground surface in the Fort Union and Mesaverde formations. Although all the bedrock formations at the site are thought to contain water, those below the Green River Formation (below 1000 in depth) are also gas-bearing, and have very low permeabilities. The transport scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Fort Union Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affect radionuclide transport at the site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values. Given the sparse data, the modeling results may differ significantly from reality. Confidence in transport predictions can be increased by obtaining more site data, including the amount of radionuclides which would have been available for transport (i.e., not trapped in melt glass or vented during gas flow testing), and the hydraulic properties of the formation. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.
Date: October 1996
Creator: Chapman, J.; Earman, S. & Andricevic, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gasbuggy underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gasbuggy site in northwestern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 29-kiloton nuclear device in 1967. The test took place in the Lewis Shale, approximately 182 m below the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, which is the aquifer closest to the detonation horizon. The conservative assumption was made that tritium was injected from the blast-created cavity into the Ojo Alamo Sandstone by the force of the explosion, via fractures created by the shot. Model results suggest that if radionuclides produced by the shot entered the Ojo Alamo, they are most likely contained within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity, followed by the variance in hydraulic conductivity, the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, the transverse hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient, and uncertainty in the source size. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affects calculations of radionuclide transport at the Gasbuggy site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation at the site; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Earman, S.; Chapman, J. & Andricevic, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test Site, Colorado

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Rulison site in west-central Colorado was the location of an underground detonation of a 40-kiloton nuclear device in 1969. The test took place 2,568 m below ground surface in the Mesaverde Formation. Though located below the regional water table, none of the bedrock formations at the site yielded water during hydraulic tests, indicating extremely low permeability conditions. The scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Mesaverde Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity and the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, with transport of strontium and cesium also sensitive to the sorption coefficient.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Earman, S.; Chapman, J. & Andricevic, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tritium migration at the Gasbuggy site: Evaluation of possible hydrologic pathways

Description: An underground nuclear test named Gasbuggy was conducted in northwestern New Mexico in 1967. Subsequent groundwater monitoring in an overlying aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed increasing levels of tritium in monitoring well EPNG 10-36, located 132 m from the test, suggesting migration of contaminants from the nuclear cavity. There are three basic scenarios that could explain the occurrence of tritium in well 10-36: (1) introduction of tritium into the well from the land surface, (2) migration of tritium through the Ojo Alamo Formation, and (3) migration through the Pictured Cliffs Formation. The two subsurface transport scenarios were evaluated with a travel time analysis. In one, transport occurs to the Ojo Alamo sandstone either up the emplacement hole or through fractures created by the blast, and then laterally through the aquifer to the monitoring well. In the other, lateral transport occurs through fractures in the underlying Pictured Cliffs detonation horizon and then migrates up the monitoring well through plugged casing connecting the two formations. The travel time analysis indicates that the hydraulic conductivity measured in the Ojo Alamo Formation is too low for lateral transport to account for the observed arrival of tritium at the monitoring well. This suggests transport either through fractures intersecting the Ojo Alamo close to well EPNG 10-36, or through fractures in the Pictured Cliffs and up through the bottom plug in the well. The transport scenarios were investigated using hydrologic logging techniques and sampling at the monitoring well, with the fieldwork conducted after the removal of a string of 0.05-m-diameter tubing that had previously provided the only monitoring access.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T. & Lyles, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Project Plan for the evaluation of REDC waste for TRU-waste radionuclides

Description: This project plan describes the plan to determine whether the solid radioactive wastes generated by the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) meet the Department of Energy`s definition of transuranic wastes. Existing waste characterization methods will be evaluated, as well as historical data, and recommendations will be made as necessary.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Nguyen, L.; Yong, L. & Chapman, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resolving discrepancies between hydraulic and chemical calibration data for seawater intrusion groundwater flow models by considering climate-driven sea level change.

Description: Groundwater models of seawater intrusion environments can be calibrated using both hydraulic and chemical information. The possible impact of the long-term transient process of sea level change is difficult to identify, but important to accurate simulation of present conditions. The response times of the pressure and chemical fields to major fluctuations in sea level change are investigated
Date: October 18, 2001
Creator: Chapman, J.; Hassan, A. & Pohlmann, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeologic characterization of wells HTH-1, UE18r, UE6e, and HTH-3, Nevada Test Site

Description: Monitoring for the migration of contaminants in groundwater or for the proper design of nuclear test emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) requires proper placement and completion of monitoring wells. This is only possible if the hydrogeologic system is understood in a regional and local context, necessitating data from existing wells and boreholes. Though the NTS Groundwater Characterization Project will be drilling wells, their great expense limits the number of new wells. However, there are many existing boreholes and wells on the NTS which have not been completely evaluated hydrologically. Some of these are incorporated in the Long Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), others are related to the testing programs. In all cases, additional site investigation in necessary to properly interpret the hydrogeologic data from these wells. Monitoring wells on the NTS are poorly characterized with regard to aquifers penetrated, vertical hydraulic gradients, and vertical variations in water quality. One of the goals of the well validation program was to gain a thorough understanding of the parameters needed to interpret the source and fate potential hazardous and radioactive substances that may be detected in these wells in the future. One of the most critical parameters for monitoring is the knowledge of what aquifer or geologic unit is being sampled when a water sample is collected. Pumped water samples are weighted most heavily to the water quality of the most productive (highest transmissivity) aquifer penetrated by the well.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Lyles, B.F.; McKay, W.A.; Chapman, J.B. & Tyler, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Groundwater velocities at the Nevada Test Site: {sup 14}Carbon-based estimates

Description: Chemical and isotopic data can be used to constrain and validate groundwater flow models. This study examines probable groundwater flowpaths at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and estimates groundwater velocities for these flowpaths using water chemistry and carbon isotopes. These velocities are provided for comparison to velocities calculated by a numerical flow model developed by GeoTrans, Inc. Similar to numerical flow models, models of chemical and isotopic evolution are not unique; any number of combinations of reactions can simulate evolution from one water to another, but are no guarantee that the simulation is correct. Knowledge of the hydrology, mineralogy, and chemistry must be combined to produce feasible evolutionary paths.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Chapman, J.B.; Hershey, R.L. & Lyles, B.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department