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Spent Fuel Test-Climax: technical measurements data management system description and data presentation

Description: The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was located 420 m below surface in the Climax Stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test was conducted under the technical direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) for the US Department of Energy. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, along with six electrical simulators, in April-May 1980. The spent fuel canisters were retrieved and the electrical simulators de-energized in March-April 1983. During the test, just over 1000 MW-hr of thermal energy was deposited in the site, causing temperature changes 100{sup 0}C near the canisters, and about 5{sup 0} in the tunnels. More than 900 channels of geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on nearly continuous basis for about 3-1/2 years, ending in September 1983. Most geotechnical instrumentation was known to be temperature sensitive, and thus would require temperature compensation before interpretation. Accordingly, a 10-in. reel of digital tape was off-loaded and shipped to Livermore every 4 to 8 weeks, where the data were verified, organized into 45 one-million-word files, and temperature corrected. The purpose of this report is to document the receipt and processing of the data by LLNL Livermore personnel, present facts about the history of the instruments which may be important to the interpretation of the data, present the data themselves in graphical form for each instrument over its operating lifetime, document the forms and locations in which the data will be archived, and offer the data to the geotechnical community for future use in understanding and predicting the effects of the storage of heat-generating waste in hard rocks such as granite.
Date: August 1, 1985
Creator: Carlson, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maximum likelihood borehole corrections for dual-detector density logs

Description: This report discusses Dual-detector density logs which have been used in the petroleum industry for years. The tool was designed with a second detector to allow compensation for the effect of a layer of mudcake between the tool and the formation being measured. The compensation algorithm commonly used calculates the correction to apply to the density measured by the long-spaced detector as proportional to the difference in the densities measured by the two detectors. The coefficient of proportionality is determined from experimental data taken with the tool in a fluid-filled hole of 15 to 40 cm diameter, with uniform thickness sheets of various materials simulating the mudcake. In applying this technology for the Containment program at the Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS) we have discovered two problems. First, we frequently log in air-filled holes much larger than 40 cm. Second, the gap, or layer, is rarely uniform with depth or vertical position on the face of the tool. We have developed a method to determine the proper amount of correction dynamically. No experimental data on the gap effect are needed as long as the two detectors are calibrated to read the proper density when the gap is zero. The method assumes that the form of the equation used in the standard algorithm is correct, but uses the variation of the two density signals with depth to determine the appropriate value of the coefficient, assuming true density varies more slowly than the gap effects. This new, maximum likelihood, method appears to work better than the standard method in both fluid and air-filled holes where the borehole wall is rough and no mudcake is present. It cannot, however, correct for a uniform mudcake or air gap, and so complements but does not replace the standard method.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Carlson, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Instrumentation Report No. 2: identification, evaluation, and remedial actions related to transducer failures at the spent fuel test-climax

Description: The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the feasibility of safe and reliable short-term storage and retrieval of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors. In support of operational and technical goals of the test, about 850 channels of instrumentation have been installed at the SFT-C. Failure of several near-field instruments began less than six months after emplacement of 11 canisters of spent fuel and activation of six thermally similar simulators. The failed units were linear potentiometers (used to make displacement measurements) and vibrating wire stressmeters (used to make change-in-stress measurements). This report discusses the observed problems and remedial actions taken to date.
Date: November 30, 1981
Creator: Patrick, W.C.; Carlson, R.C. & Rector, N.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparison of the moisture gauge and the neutron log in air-filled holes at NTS

Description: Two methods are commonly used to measure water content of geologic materials by neutron diffusion, the moisture gauge and the neutron log. Both are used at NTS, the moisture gauge in tunnels, the neutron log in vertical drilled holes. In this work, the moisture gauge and the neutron log are compared for use in air-filled holes NTS. The measurement instruments have evolved with very different operational characteristics and one important physics difference, the source to detector spacing. The moisture gauge has a very short, 0--6 cm spacing, with little internal shielding, and count increases with water. The neutron log has a long spacing, 30--50 cm, substantial internal shielding, and exhibits decreasing count with increasing water. The moisture gauge gives better bed resolution than the neutron log. Because its count increases with water, the moisture gauge is more strongly affected by water in the borehole, especially in dry formations. In these conditions the neutron log is the method of choice. In air-filled holes, if source size or logging time is not a constraint, the relative sensitivity of the two tools to water is determined by the relative strengths of borehole effects as fluid, holesize, or tool-wall gap. If source size is a constraint for safety reasons, the short spacing provides higher countrates for a given detector efficiency and thus better relative precision in determining the true count. If source size is limited because of detector or electronics saturation, the short spacing will be better at high water content, while the long spacing will be better at low water content. The short spacing may have an advantage because it can make better contact with the hole wall and can be more easily corrected for gap. The long spacing tool is currently used in vertical holes at NTS because that is the only ...
Date: August 1, 1993
Creator: Hearst, J. R. & Carlson, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

Description: Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C. & Buscheck, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The CSMS (Configurable Seismic Monitoring System) Poorboy deployment: Seismic recording in Pinedale, Wyoming, of the Bullion NTS (Nevada Test Site) nuclear test under the verification provisions of the new TTBT protocol

Description: The Configurable Seismic Monitoring System (CSMS), developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was deployed in a 13-m deep vault on the AFTAC facility at Pinedale, Wyoming to record the Bullion nuclear test. The purpose of the exercise was to meet all provisions of the new TTBT protocol on in-country seismic recording at a Designated Seismic Station (DSS). The CSMS successfully recorded the Bullion event consistent with and meeting all requirements in the new treaty protocol. In addition, desirable seismic system features not specified in the treaty protocol were determined; treaty protocol ambiguities were identified, and useful background noise recordings at the Pinedale site were obtained. 10 figs.
Date: July 10, 1990
Creator: Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W. & Carlson, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent Fuel Test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1982

Description: The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the technical direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April to May 1980, thus initiating a test with a planned 3- to 5-year fuel storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Three exchanges of spent fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and two previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 2-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Data continue to be acquired from the test. Some data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include analysis of fracture data obtained during site characterization, laboratory studies of radiation effects and drilling damage in Climax granite, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response, a ventilation effects study, and further development of the data acquisition and management systems.
Date: February 1, 1983
Creator: Patrick, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Hage, G.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, Fiscal Year 1983

Description: The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April-May 1980. The spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized in March-April 1983 when test data indicated that test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and three previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the 3-1/2 year duration of the test on more than 900 channels. Data acquisition from the test is now limited to instrumentation calibration and evaluation activities. Data now available for analysis are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include a campaign of in situ stress measurements, mineralogical and petrological studies of pretest core samples, microfracture analyses of laboratory irradiated cores, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response during the final months of heating as well as during a six-month cool-down period, metallurgical analyses of selected test components, and further development of the data acquisition and data management systems. 27 references, 68 figures, 10 tables.
Date: February 1, 1984
Creator: Patrick, W.C.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Ganow, H.C.; Hage, G.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department