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Mobile teleoperator research at Savannah River Laboratory

Description: A Robotics Technology Group was organized at Savannah River Laboratory to employ modern automation and robotics for applications at the Savannah River site. Several industrial robots have been installed in plant processes. Other robotics systems are under development in the laboratories, including mobile teleoperators for general remote tasks and emergency response operations. This paper discusses present work on a low-cost wheeled mobile vehicle, a modular light duty manipulator arm, a large gantry telerobot system, and a high technology six-legged walking robot with a teleoperated arm.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Byrd, J S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microcomputers for nuclear instrumentation. [PET computers]

Description: Small, desk-top Commodore PET computers are being used to solve nuclear instrumentation problems at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The ease of operating, programing, interfacing, and maintaining the PET computer makes it a cost-effective solution to many real-time instrumentation problems that involve both data acquisition and date processing. The IEEE-488 GPIB (General Purpose Instrument Bus) is an integral part of the PET hardware. This paper reviews GPIB design concepts and discusses SRL applications that use the PET computer as a GPIB controller. 11 figures, 2 tables.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Byrd, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of robotics in nuclear facilities

Description: Industrial robots and other robotic systems have been successfully applied at the Savannah River nuclear site. These applications, new robotic systems presently under development, general techniques for the employment of robots in nuclear facilities, and future systems are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Byrd, J S & Fisher, J J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An intelligent inspection and survey robot

Description: Large quantities of mixed and low-level radioactive waste contained in 55-, 85-, and 110-gallon steel drums are stored at Department of Energy (DOE) warehouses located throughout the United States. The steel drums are placed on pallets and stacked on top of one another, forming a column of drums ranging in heights of one to four drums and up to 16 feet high. The columns of drums are aligned in rows forming an aisle approximately three feet wide between the rows of drums. Tens of thousands of drums are stored in these warehouses throughout the DOE complex. ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), is under development for the DOE to survey and inspect these drums. The robot will navigate through the aisles and perform an inspection operation, typically performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Byrd, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-level stored waste inspection using mobile robots

Description: A mobile robot inspection system, ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy to replace human inspectors in the routine, regulated inspection of radioactive waste stored in drums. The robot will roam the three-foot aisles of drums, stacked four high, making decisions about the surface condition of the drums and maintaining a database of information about each drum. A distributed system of onboard and offboard computers will provide versatile, friendly control of the inspection process. This mobile robot system, based on a commercial mobile platform, will improve the quality of inspection, generate required reports, and relieve human operators from low-level radioactive exposure. This paper describes and discusses primarily the computer and control processes for the system.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Byrd, J.S. & Pettus, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A robotic inspector for low-level radioactive waste

Description: The Department of Energy has low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at several facilities. Weekly visual inspections are required. A mobile robot inspection system, ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed to survey and inspect the stored drums. The robot will travel through the three- foot wide aisles of drums stacked four high and perform a visual inspection, normally performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. This mobile robot system will improve the quality of inspection, generate required reports, and relieve human operators from low-level radioactive exposure.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Byrd, J.S. & Pettus, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of Femtosecond-Phase Stabilization in 2 km OpticalFiber

Description: Long-term phase drifts of less than a femtosecond per hour have been demonstrated in a 2 km length of single-mode optical fiber, stabilized interferometrically at 1530 nm. Recent improvements include a wide-band phase detector that reduces the possibility of fringe jumping due to fast external perturbations of the fiber and locking of the master CW laser wavelength to an atomic absorption line. Mode-locked lasers may be synchronized using two wavelengths of the comb, multiplexed over one fiber, each wavelength individually interferometrically stabilized.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Staples, J.W.; Wilcox, R. & Byrd, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Collection of Complex Permittivity and Permeability Measurements

Description: We present the results of measurements of the complex permittivity and permeability over a frequency range of 0.1-5.1 GHz for a range of microwave absorbing materials used in a variety of accelerator applications. We also describe the automated measurement technique which uses swept-frequency S-parameter measurements made on a strip transmission line device loaded with the material under test.
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Barry, W.; Byrd, J.; Johnson, J. & Smithwick, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The TE Wave Transmission Method for Electron Cloud Measurements at Cesr-TA

Description: We report on the optimization of TE Wave measurements at the Cesr-TA ring at Cornell University. The CESR storage ring is currently used as a test bed for technologies to be used in the damping rings of the International Linear Collider. The TE Wave measurement method utilizes capacitive buttons (BPMs) in the ring to excite and detect a propagating electromagnetic wave corresponding to the beampipe's fundamental TE mode. The presence of low-energy electrons along the wave path changes its propagation characteristics, which can be detected by analyzing the received signal. By choosing the machine fill pattern (gaps and bunch trains length) it is possible to modulate the density of the electron cloud and derive information on its rise and fall times by observing the detected signal spectrum. The possibility of circulating both electron and positron beams in the ring enabled us to separate the contribution of primary photoelectrons, which are independent on the circulating particle nature, from the transverse resonant mechanism, which can increase the primary electron density many times over and which only takes place with a circulating positron beam.
Date: May 4, 2009
Creator: Desantis, S.; Byrd, J.; Sikora, J. & Billing, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transverse Periodic Beam Loading Effects in a Storage Ring

Description: Uneven beam fill patterns in storage rings, such as gaps in the fill patterns, leads to periodic, or transient loading of the modes of the RF cavities. We show that an analogous effect can occur in the loading of a dipole cavity mode when the beam passes off the electrical center of the cavity mode. Although this effect is small, it results in a variation of the transverse offset of the beam along the bunch train. For ultralow emittance beams, such as optimized third generation light sources and damping rings, this effect results in a larger projected emittance of the beam compared with the single bunch emittance. The effect is particularly strong for the case when a strong dipole mode has been purposely added to the ring, such as a deflecting, or 'crab' cavity. We derive an approximate analytic solution for the variation of the beam-induced deflecting voltage along the bunch train.
Date: May 4, 2009
Creator: Thompson, J.R. & Byrd, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lifetime increase using passive harmonic cavities insynchrotronlight sources

Description: Harmonic cavities have been used in storage rings to increase beam lifetime and Landau damping by lengthening the bunch.The need for lifetime increase is particularly great in the present generation of low to medium energy synchrotron light sources where the small transverse beam sizes lead to relatively short lifetimes from large-angle intrabeam (Touschek) scattering. We review the beam dynamics of harmonic radiofrequency (RF) systems and discuss optimization of the beam lifetime using passive harmonic cavities.
Date: September 22, 2000
Creator: Byrd, J.M. & Georgsson, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Longitudinal injection transients in an electron storagering

Description: We present the results of an experimental study of the longitudinal beam dynamics at injection in the Advanced Light Source (ALS), an electron storage ring. By measuring the longitudinal bunch distribution following injection using a streak camera, we were able to study several useful and interesting e.ects as well as improve overall injection efficiency. These include measurement and correction of the phase and energy offsets at injection, measurement of the injected bunch length and energy spread, direct observation of phase space filamentation due to the spread in synchrotron frequencies, and measurement of the effective damping rate of the bunch shape including radiation damping and decoherence. We have also made some initial studies of the decay of an uncaptured beam at injection which may provide a novel means of measuring the radiation loss per turn.
Date: November 2, 2000
Creator: Byrd, J.M. & De Santis, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ALS-N - A candidate for a next-generation synchrontron light-source

Description: Judging from the experiments currently being pursued at the ALS, there is already a compelling case to be made for considering a future synchrotron radiation source that has a higher beam brightness than the third-generation facilities. For example, a large, and growing fraction of the ALS scientific program is based on soft x-ray microscopy experiments in materials science. Currently these experiments use high-brightness undulator radiation, on beam lines that are already oversubscribed. Dedicated beam lines from bend magnet sources would be useful for these techniques if the source brightness could be pushed to {approx}2{circ}10{sup 16} photons/(s {circ} mm{sup 2} {circ} mrad{sup 2} {circ} 0.1%b.w.), i.e., a factor of 20-100 higher (depending on wavelength), than currently available at the ALS. Another growing class of experiments uses microfocused beams for microanalysis, microdiffraction, microEXAFS, microXPS, and microNEXAFS. These are classic brightness experiments, but even at the high ALS brightnesses, require long exposure times. Finally there is a requirement to get to {approx}2 keV in the fundamental peak of the undulator spectrum, to access most transition- metal L-edges, and the rare-earth M-edges. This could be achieved with a machine energy of 2.5-3.0 GeV. An alternative strategy is to go to smaller gaps with a shorter period undulator - which is compatible with lower emittance beams.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Jackson, A.; Byrd, J. & Decking, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observations of collective effects at the Advanced Light Source

Description: We present a summary of measurements of single beam collective effects in the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We describe measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities, including some recent results using the newly commissioned feedback systems and the results of an initial search for the fast ion instability. Single bunch effects include bunch lengthening, energy spread increase, HOM loss measurements, head-tail damping rates, current dependent tune shifts, and transverse mode coupling instability threshold. The longitudinal measurements are consistent with a broadband impedance {vert_bar}{Zeta}{sub {parallel}}/{eta}{vert_bar}{sub eff} = 0.22{plus_minus}0.07 {Omega} and transverse measurements indicate broadband impedances of {Zeta}{sub y,eff} = 155 k{Omega}/m and Z{sub x,eff} = 58 k{Omega}/m.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Byrd, J.M.; Barry, W.; Corlett, J.N.; Fox, J. & Teytelman, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commissioning of the advanced light source dual-axis streak camera

Description: A dual-axis camera, Hamamatsu model C5680, has been installed on the Advanced Light Source photon-diagnostics beam-line to investigate electron-beam parameters. During its commissioning process, the camera has been used to measure single-bunch length vs. current, relative bunch charge in adjacent RF buckets, and bunchphase stability. In this paper the authors describe the visible-light branch of the diagnostics beam-line, the streak-camera installation, and the timing electronics. They will show graphical results of beam measurements taken during a variety of accelerator conditions.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Hinkson, J.; Keller, R. & Byrd, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department