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Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

Description: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the possibility of higher strength graphite. Moreover, the inclusion of carbon fibers may provide a toughening mechanism, resulting in tougher, stronger graphite at an ...
Date: June 30, 2004
Creator: Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation damage in carbon-carbon composites: Structure and property effects

Description: Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation tokamak reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require high thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites and other materials, such as beryllium, to protect their plasma facing components from the anticipated high heat fluxes. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce a large neutron flux. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HAIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORAL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (da) at an irradiation temperature of {approximately}600{degrees}C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated here included unidirectional, two- directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Irradiation induced dimensional changes are reported for the materials and related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, carbon-carbon composite material dimensional changes are discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. Neutron irradiation induced reductions in the thermal conductivity of two, three-directional carbon-carbon composites are reported, and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is demonstrated. Irradiation induced strength changes are reported for several carbon-carbon composite materials and are explained in terms of in-crystal and composite structural effects.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A microstructurally based fracture model for nuclear graphite

Description: This paper reports the physical basis of, and assumptions behind, a fracture model for nuclear graphites. Microstructurally related inputs, such as filler particle size, filler particle fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}), density, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (size and volume), are utilized in the model. The model has been applied to two graphites, Great Lakes Carbon Corporation grade H-451 and Toyo Tanso grade IG-110. For each graphite, the predicted tensile failure probabilities are compared with experimental data generated using ASTM Standard C-749 tensile test specimens. The predicted failure probabilities are in close agreement with the experimental data, particularly in the case of the H-451. The model is also shown to qualitatively predict the influence on the failure probabilities of changes in filler particle size, density, pore size, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (stressed volume). The good performance is attributed to the sound physical basis of the model, which recognizes the dominant role of porosity in controlling crack initiation and propagation during graphite fracture. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

Description: Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600{degree}C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Burchell, T. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effects of specimen geometry and size on the fracture toughness of nuclear graphites

Description: In a joint Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)/Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) study, various fracture toughness techniques were applied to Toyo Tanso grade IG-110 graphite to establish if specimen geometry influences on fracture toughness. The test geometries investigated were: compact tension (CT), disc compact tension (DCT), short rod (SR), chevron-notched short-red (CNSR), cylindrical bend specimen (BS), and centrally slotted disc (CSD). Specimen geometries which allow slow crack propagation, such as the CNSR and CT, yielded higher fracture toughness values than those where fracture is very rapid, e.g., the CSD. In a further ORNL study, the CNSR specimen geometry was selected to investigate the effect of specimen size on fracture toughness. Three specimen sizes and three grades of graphite were examined: Great Lakes Carbon grade H-451, Stackpole grade 2020, and Toyo Tanso grade IG-110. Grade H-451 was the toughest graphite, while Stackpole 2020 was the least tough. Fracture toughness increased with increasing specimen size for all graphites tested. This result was attributed to rising R-curve behavior. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Romanoski, G.R. & Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A novel carbon fiber based material and separation technology

Description: Our novel carbon fiber based adsorbent material shows preferential uptake of CO[sub 2] over other gases. The material has a unique combination of properties, which include a large micropore volume, a large BET surface area, and electrical conductivity. These properties have been exploited to effect the separation of CO[sub 2] from a model gas (CH[sub 4]). Enhanced desorption is achieved using an electrical current passed through the material at low voltage. The manufacture, characterization, and CO[sub 2] adsorption behavior of the materials is reported here, along with our novel electrical swing separation technology.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Burchell, T.D. & Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Method for reinforcing threads in multilayer composite tubes and cylindrical structures

Description: Multilayer techniques such as: tape wrapping, braiding, and filament winding represent versatile and economical routes for fabricating composite tubes and cylindrical structures. However, multilayer architectures lack the radial reinforcement required to retain threads when the desired means of connection or closure is a threaded joint. This issue was addressed in the development of a filament wound, carbon-carbon composite impact shell for the NASA radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The problem of poor thread shear strength was solved by incorporating a number of radial elements of triangular geometry around the circumference of the thread for the full length of thread engagement. The radial elements significantly increased the shear strength of the threaded joint by transmitting the applied force to the balance of composite structure. This approach is also applicable to ceramic composites.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Romanoski, G.R. & Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Passive CO{sub 2} removal using a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve

Description: Manufacture and characterization of a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS), and its efficacy as a CO{sub 2} gas adsorbent are reported. The CFCMS consists of an isotropic pitch derived carbon fiber and a phenolic resin derived carbon binder. Activation (selective gasification) of the CFCMS creates microporosity in the carbon fibers, yielding high micropore volumes (>0.5 cm{sup 3}/g) and BET surface areas (>1000 m{sup 2}/g). Moreover, the CFCMS material is a rigid, strong, monolith with an open structure that allows the free-flow of fluids through the material. This combination of properties provides an adsorbent material that has several distinct advantages over granular adsorbents in gas separation systems such as pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. The results of our initial evaluations of the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and kinetics of CFCMS are reported. The room temperature CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of CFCMS is >120 mg of CO{sub 2} per g of CFCMS. A proposed project is described that targets the development, over a three-year period, of a demonstration separation system based on CFCMS for the removal of CO{sub 2} from a flue gas slip stream at a coal-fired power plant. The proposed program would be conducted jointly with industrial and utility partners.
Date: December 1995
Creator: Burchell, T. D. & Judkins, R. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

(Critical topics of plasma facing materials/plasma facing component data for the next step fusion devices)

Description: The Unites States-Japan Workshop P-165 brought together approximately 60 scientists and engineers to discuss critical topics of plasma facing materials and components for the next-step fusion device. In addition to the United States and Japanese participants, there were several guest attendees from Europe. The international makeup of the participants greatly enhanced the success of the workshop. The author jointly chaired a workshop session entitled Impact of Neutron Effects to Plasma Facing Materials and Plasma Facing Component (PFC) Feasibilities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER),'' and presented an overview paper on neutron effects and materials selection for the next-step plasma facing devices. The author presented his work on the effects of neutron irradiation on graphites and carbon-carbon (c/c) composite materials, which are strong candidate materials for PFC's in ITER. The workshop addressed many issues of current concern to the PFC/PFM community including: plasma erosion of PFM's; trapping/detrapping of hydrogen isotopes; large machine operating experience; and extent of the materials database.
Date: January 4, 1991
Creator: Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Graphite Technology Development Plan

Description: This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Windes, W.; Burchell, T. & Bratton, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Graphite Technology Development Plan

Description: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.
Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Windes, W.; Burchell, T. & M.Carroll
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NGNP Graphite Selection and Acquisition Strategy

Description: The nuclear graphite (H-451) previously used in the United States for High-Temperature Reactors (HTRs) is no longer available. New graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A complete properties database for these new, available, candidate grades of graphite must be developed to support the design and licensing of NGNP core components. Data are required for the physical, mechanical (including radiation-induced creep), and oxidation properties of graphites. Moreover, the data must be statistically sound and take account of in-billet, between billets, and lot-to-lot variations of properties. These data are needed to support the ongoing development1 of the risk-derived American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) graphite design code (a consensus code being prepared under the jurisdiction of the ASME by gas-cooled reactor and NGNP stakeholders including the vendors). The earlier Fort St. Vrain design of High-Temperature Reactor (HTRs) used deterministic performance models for H-451, while the NGNP will use new graphite grades and risk-derived (probabilistic) performance models and design codes, such as that being developed by the ASME. A radiation effects database must be developed for the currently available graphite materials, and this requires a substantial graphite irradiation program. The graphite Technology Development Plan (TDP)2 describes the data needed and the experiments planned to acquire these data in a timely fashion to support NGNP design, construction, and licensing. The strategy for the selection of appropriate grades of graphite for the NGNP is discussed here. The final selection of graphite grades depends upon the chosen reactor type and vendor because the reactor type (pebble bed or prismatic block) has a major influence on the graphite chosen by the designer. However, the time required to obtain the needed irradiation data for the selected NGNP graphite is sufficiently long that a preliminary selection was necessary in 2005. ...
Date: September 30, 2007
Creator: Burchell, T.; Bratton, R. & Windes, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Graphite for the nuclear industry

Description: Graphite finds applications in both fission and fusion reactors. Fission reactors harness the energy liberated when heavy elements, such as uranium or plutonium, fragment or fission''. Reactors of this type have existed for nearly 50 years. The first nuclear fission reactor, Chicago Pile No. 1, was constructed of graphite under a football stand at Stagg Field, University of Chicago. Fusion energy devices will produce power by utilizing the energy produced when isotopes of the element hydrogen are fused together to form helium, the same reaction that powers our sun. The role of graphite is very different in these two reactor systems. Here we summarize the function of the graphite in fission and fusion reactors, detailing the reasons for their selection and discussing some of the challenges associated with their application in nuclear fission and fusion reactors. 10 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Fuller, E.L.; Romanoski, G.R. & Strizak, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The adsorption of water vapor on carbon fiber composite molecular sieve

Description: Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular Sieve (CFCMS) is a porous adsorbent carbon material manufactured from isotropic pitch derived carbon fibers and a phenolic resin binder via a slurry molding process. The material is produced in the form of a monolith and can be activated in steam, CO{sub 2} or O{sub 2}, during which it develops high BET surface areas and micropore volumes. The material has a continuous carbon skeletal structure and is, therefore, electrically conductive. The passage of an electric current at low voltage allows for direct resistive heating of the carbon and thus provides an efficient method of desorbing adsorbed gases. This method of separating gases has been named electrical swing adsorption (ESA) and is analogous to thermal or pressure swing adsorption. Recently, the authors have examined the potential of CFCMS/ESA for the adsorption and separation of water vapor. Frequently, water vapor must be removed from a gas stream before separation and processing can occur. To assess the potential of CFCMS for water adsorption a series of CFCMS samples were manufactured and activated to relatively high burn-off. Half of each sample was treated at 200 C in flowing oxygen to increase the number of chemisorbed surface functional groups. The amount of water adsorbed has previously been shown to be controlled by the availability of surface functional groups (such as carboxylic acid) which act as active sites for the adsorption of water. Here the authors report the preliminary study of the moisture adsorption behavior of treated and untreated CFCMS samples.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R. & Rogers, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A novel approach to the removal of CO{sub 2}

Description: The removal of CO{sub 2} from gas streams is becoming increasingly significant in the field of energy production. A porous monolithic activated carbon material (CFCMS) has been developed that is both strong and rigid, yet is permeable, and thus offers little resistance to the free-flow of fluids. The material has a unique combination of properties, including reasonable compressive strength, electrical conductivity, a large micropore volume, and a large CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. At 30{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure, CFCMS has a CO{sub 2} uptake >100 mg/g. The uptake is reduced at elevated temperatures, dropping to {approximately}40 mg/g at 100{degrees}C. However, the CO{sub 2} uptake increases substantially with pressure, such that at 25{degrees}C and 58 bar the mass of CO{sub 2} adsorbed is >490 mg/g. The ability of CFCMS to selectively remove CO{sub 2} from a CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas mixture is demonstrated in a series of breakthrough experiments. The unique combination of properties of CFCMS has been exploited to effect the rapid desorption of CO{sub 2} under the influence of a low applied dc voltage.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.; Rogers, M.R. & Williams, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A novel carbon fiber based porous carbon monolith

Description: A novel porous carbon material based on carbon fibers has been developed. The material, when activated, develops a significant micro- or mesopore volume dependent upon the carbon fiber type utilized (isotropic pitch or polyacrylonitrile). The materials will find applications in the field of fluid separations or as a catalyst support. Here, the manufacture and characterization of our porous carbon monoliths are described.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Klett, J.W. & Weaver, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

Description: Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Burchell, T. D.; Eatherly, W. P.; Engle, G. B. & Hollenberg, G. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Structure and Properties of Carbon Fiber Based Adsorbent Monoliths

Description: Carbon fiber monoliths manufactured by a novel slurry molding process from isotropic pitch-derived fibers are being developed at ORNL for gas separation and storage applications [1]. Low density (p = 0.2 - 0,3 g/cm3) monoliths have been successfully demonstrated to have an acceptable pressure drop for gas separation applications and are currently being developed for C02/CH4 separations, whereas monoliths with densities in the range p = 0.4 - 0.6 g/cm3 have been "shown to have natural gas storage capacities of >100 VIV at 500 psi pressure and room temperature. Thermal conductivity, as a function of temperature, was measured using the LASER flash, thermal- pulse method. Another approach to minimizing the temperature gradients that develop in a storage bed is to increase the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent carbon. To this end, we have developed hybrid monoliths that contain small fractions of mesophase pitch- derived carbon fibers. Our hybrid monoliths exhibit thermal conductivities in the range 0.2-0.9 W/m.K depending on the blend and density of the monolith. In comparison, a packed bed of granular carbon at comparable density would have a thermal conductivity of approximately 0.1 W/m.K [ 1 ]. The thermal conductivities of several of the hybrid The improved thermal conductivity of our monoliths is attributed to the bonding between the fibers and the incorporation of high thermal conductivity, mesophase pitch-derived carbon fibers. These features are visible in the SEM micrograph in Fig. 4.
Date: November 6, 1998
Creator: Burchell, T.; Judkins, R.R.; Rogers, M.R. & Shaw, W.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

Description: This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.
Date: July 1, 2012
Creator: Morton, D. K.; Jetter, R I; Nestell, James E; Burchell, T. D. & Sham, T L (Sam)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon composite for a PEM fuel cell bipolar plate

Description: The current major cost component for proton exchange membrane fuel cells is bipolar plate. An option being explored for replacing the current, nominal machined graphite component is a molded carbon fiber material. One face and the volume of the component will be left porous, while the opposite surface and sides are hermetically sealed via chemical vapor infiltration of carbon. This paper will address initial work on the concept.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Besmann, T.M.; Klett, J.W. & Burchell, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

Description: The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for ...
Date: January 12, 2004
Creator: Anderson, John H.; Benham, Charles; Berry, Earl R.; He, Ming; Schrader, Charles H.; Shah, Lalit S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment

Description: The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Shaber, Eric; Baccaglini, G.; Ball, S.; Burchell, T.; Corwin, B.; Fewell, T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effects of neutron irradiation on the structure of carbon-carbon composites

Description: In this paper irradiation behavior of carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites are discussed in terms on simple microstructural models. Previous data are discussed in terms of these models. New data are presented for the irradiation-induced dimensional changes of selected carbon-carbon composites. The influence of fiber precursor on carbon- carbon irradiation performance is discussed.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Burchell, T.D.; Eatherly, W.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hollenberg, G. W.; Slagle, O.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)) & Watson, R.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department