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JOINING OF BERYLLIUM-A SURVEY OF THE UNCLASSIFIED LITERATURE

Description: The unclassified literature on the joining of beryllium was surveyed and is summarized. The fields covered are fusion welding, self-welding (diffusion- or pressure-welding), and brazing. The most successful attempts in each field are outlined and other work is referenced. (aauth)
Date: June 1, 1958
Creator: Brown, N.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adsorption and diffusion of plutonium in soil

Description: The behavior of plutonium (Pu) was studied in three soils that varied in texture, CEC, pH, organic matter content and mineralogy (Fuquay, Muscatine, Burbank). Two isotopes, /sup 238/Pu and /sup 239/Pu, were used in order to detect Pu over a range of several orders of magnitude. Unless added in a chelated form, Pu was added to the soil as a nitrate in .01 N HNO/sub 3/ to simulate the release of acidic waste on the soil and to prevent rapid Pu hydrolysis or polymerization.
Date: unknown
Creator: Brown, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High order finite element method for the calculation of capillary surfaces. [Young--Laplace equation]

Description: A reduced quadratic finite element method on quadrilaterals is developed for discretizing the capillary equation in regular and irregular domains. Newton's method is used to solve the resulting set of nonlinear equations for the capillary surface. Numerical experiments are conducted for square and elliptical capillaries in order to compare this high-order method to a bilinear finite element-Newton scheme and a finite difference--dynamic alternating direction implicit (DADI) technique. The reduced quadratic finite element method is shown to be the most efficient in these tests due to the relatively coarse element grids that can be used for accurate approximations.
Date: December 1, 1977
Creator: Brown, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Empirical modeling of a Lysholm helical screw expander

Description: Testing of a Lysholm helical screw expander having a rotor diameter of 5.12 inches and an expansion ratio of 5.3 was performed with simulated geothermal fluid at an inlet pressure of 120 psia. The inlet quality, engine speed and pressure ratio were independently varied to produce a three-dimensional data matrix of 104 data points. Statistical curve fitting methods were adapted to produce equations for mass flow rate and power output in terms of the three variables associated with the data matrix. These explicit equations were combined with a steam table subroutine to produce a computer model for prediction of mass flow rate, power, efficiency and exhaust quality at a given set of operating conditions. The predictive ability observed during validation of the model is adequate for use in modeling of hybrid geothermal energy conversion systems. Mass flow rates werre predicted to within 2.7% of the measured values. For most conditions, predictions of power were within 3.3% of the measured values. Predictions of efficiency reflected the combined errors in prediction of power and mass flow rate. Efficiency predictions were in error by as much as 5% of the measured values. The predictions for exhaust quality were within 0.4% of the measured values. Isentropic engine efficiencies of over 43% were measured during the tests. An observed peak in efficiency represented an optimum pressure ratio and a trade-off between lower leakage fractions at high speeds and low inlet qualities, increasing frictional losses at high speeds, and increasing fluid and power densities at low qualities.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Brown, K.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Portable code development in C

Description: With a new generation of high performance computers appearing around us on a time scale of months, a new challenge for developers of simulation codes is to write and maintain production codes that are both highly portable and maximally efficient. My contention is that C is the language that is both best suited to that goal and is widely available today. GLF is a new code written mainly in C which is intended to have all of the XRASER physics and run on any platform of interest. It demonstrates the power of the C paradigm for code developers and flexibility and ease of use for the users. Three fundamental problems are discussed: the C/UNIX development environment; the supporting tools and libraries which handle data and graphics portability issues; and the advantages of C in numerical simulation code development.
Date: November 6, 1990
Creator: Brown, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sorting out Q values, threshold energies and level excitations in ENDL and ENDF

Description: While attempting to convert data to/from ENDF and ENDL, I discovered inconsistencies in the treatment of Q values in ENDF. These are my notes documenting these inconsistencies. The most interesting section is the last section where I compare Q values in JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VII{beta}1 for various Americium isotopes.
Date: November 2, 2005
Creator: Brown, D A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MEASUREMENTS OF PAST 14C LEVELS AND 13C/12C RATIOS IN THE SURFACE WATERS OF THE WORLD'S SUBPOLAR OCEANS.

Description: Under this project we have developed methods that allow the reconstruction of past {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean by measuring the {sup 14}C contents of archived salmon scales. The overall goal of this research was to reduce of the uncertainty in the uptake of fossil CO{sub 2} by the oceans and thereby improve the quantification of the global carbon cycle and to elucidate the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs), with their three dimensional global spatial coverage and temporal modeling capabilities, provide the best route to accurately calculating the total uptake of CO{sub 2} by the oceans and, hence, to achieving the desired reduction in uncertainty. {sup 14}C has played, and continues to play, a central role in the validation of the OGCMs calculations, particularly with respect to those model components which govern the uptake of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and the transport of this carbon within the oceans. Under this project, we have developed time-series records of the {sup 14}C levels of the surface waters of three areas of the subpolar North Pacific Ocean. As the previously available data on the time-history of oceanic surface water {sup 14}C levels are very limited, these time-series records provide significant new {sup 14}C data to constrain and validate the OGCMs.
Date: April 22, 2010
Creator: Brown, T A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of Current Plutonium Evaluations And an Update Plan for ENDL99

Description: We review the current state of ENDL99, ENDF/B-VI.r8, JENDL-3.3, JEFF-3.0 and ENDF/B-VII.{beta}0 plutonium evaluations and lay out a tentative plan for updating all of the ENDL99 plutonium evaluations. In some specific cases, an evaluation for a particular isotope is of sufficient quality for us to adopt in ENDL99. More often, the quality of all evaluations for an isotope are low enough that we will need to perform a new evaluation.
Date: April 29, 2005
Creator: Brown, D A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computing the correlation and other things directly from the raw pairs

Description: We want a faster and more robust way to compute the correlation, expanded in Spherical (or Cartesian) Harmonics. We also want to include the cross-{ell},m data covariance that are there, but currently ignored. We don't want to get bogged down in fancy binning in x-y-z or r-{theta}-{phi}, just r. Want to just look at C{sub {ell}m} to decide how many terms to keep--or better yet the pair distributions directly.
Date: August 16, 2007
Creator: Brown, D A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight investigation at low angles of attack to determine the longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a cruciform canard missile configuration with a low-aspect-ratio wing and blunt nose at Mach numbers from 1.2 to 2.1

Description: Report presenting flight testing of a rocket-powered model of a cruciform canard missile configuration with a low-aspect-ratio wing and blunt nose. Results regarding the lift coefficient, dynamic stability, static stability, control effectiveness, and drag are provided.
Date: September 30, 1957
Creator: Brown, Clarence A., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight investigation at low angles of attack to determine the longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a cruciform canard missile configuration with a low-aspect-ratio wing and blunt nose at Mach numbers from 1.2 to 2.1

Description: Report presenting testing of a full-scale rocket-powered model of a cruciform canard missile configuration with a low-aspect-ratio wing and blunt nose. Static and dynamic longitudinal stability and control derivatives were determined at low angles of attack and for a range of Mach numbers.
Date: September 30, 1957
Creator: Brown, Clarence A., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Longitudinal stability characteristics of a simple infrared homing missile configuration at Mach numbers of 0.7 to 1.4

Description: Report presenting the longitudinal stability characteristics of a simple infrared homing missile determined in flight with a rocket-powered model. Static and dynamic longitudinal stability derivatives of the cruciform, interdigitated, canard-wing missile configuration were determined using the pulse-rocket technique for a range of Mach numbers.
Date: June 12, 1956
Creator: Brown, Clarence A., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flight Investigation at Low Angles of Attack to Determine the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of the Sidewinder Missile at Mach Numbers from 1.2 to 2.1

Description: At the request of the Bureau of Ordnance, Department of the Navy, the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Division has initiated a program to investigate the general aerodynamic characteristics of the Naval Ordnance Test Station's SIDEWINDER missile. The model used in the flight test presented herein was a full-scale, rocket-propelled test vehicle. This paper presents the results from a flight test investigation using the pulsed-control technique to determine the static and dynamic longitudinal stability and control derivatives and drag data for a canard-missile configuration. The methods for obtaining these data are presented in references 1 and 2. This investigation was conducted at a small angle-of-attack range and for a Mach number range of 1.2 to 2.1. The model used in this investigation was flight-tested at the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Station at Wallops Island, Va.
Date: November 2, 1955
Creator: Brown, Clarence A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

H1640 caster tool development report

Description: This report describes the development and certification of the H1640 caster tool. This tool is used to rotate swivel caster wheels 90 degrees on bomb hand trucks or shipping containers. The B83 is a heavy bomb system and weighs close to 5,600 pounds for a two-high stack configuration. High castering moments (handle length times the force exerted on handle) are required to caster a wheel for a two-high stack of B83s. The H1640 is available to the DoD (Air Force) through the Special Equipment List (SEL) for the B83 as a replacement for the H631 and H1216 caster tools.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Brown, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility investments in low-income energy-efficiency programs

Description: In the increasingly competitive utility industry, it is imperative that equity programs be as cost-effective as possible. In some cases, this is accomplished by working in partnership with government programs such as the US Department of Energy`s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. This paper provides an overview of the DSM and conservation programs being operated by utilities for low-income customers and describes the types of utility-government partnerships that exist.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scenarios of U.S. Carbon Reductions: Potential Impacts of Energy-Efficient and Low-Carbon Technologies by 2010 and Beyond

Description: This report presents the results of a study conducted by five US Department of Energy national laboratories that quantifies the potential for energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. The stimulus for this study derives from a growing recognition that any national effort to reduce the growth of greenhouse gas emissions must consider ways of increasing the productivity of energy use. To add greater definition to this view, they quantify the reductions in carbon emissions that can be attained through the improved performance and increased penetration of efficient and low-carbon technologies by the year 2010. They also take a longer-term perspective by characterizing the potential for future research and development to produce further carbon reductions over the next quarter century. As such, this report makes a strong case for the value of energy technology research, development, demonstration, and diffusion as a public response to global climate change. Three overarching conclusions emerge from their analysis of alternative carbon reduction scenarios. First, a vigorous national commitment to develop and deploy cost-effective energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies could reverse the trend toward increasing carbon emissions. Along with utility sector investments, such a commitment could halt the growth in US energy consumption and carbon emissions so that levels in 2010 are close to those in 1997 (for energy) and in 1990 (for carbon). It must be noted that such a vigorous national commitment would have to go far beyond current efforts. Second, if feasible ways are found to implement the carbon reductions, the cases analyzed in the study are judged to yield energy savings that are roughly equal to or greater than costs. Third, a next generation of energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies promises to enable the continuation of an aggressive pace of carbon reductions over the next quarter century.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weatherization Works: Final Report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

Description: In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation's largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year. The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it saves energy, lowers fuel bills, and improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years. The Program's mission is to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families--particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Substantial progress has been made, but the job is far from over. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that the average low-income family spends 12 percent of its income on residential energy, compared to only 3% for the average-income family. Homes where low-income families live also have a greater need for energy efficiency improvements, but less money to pay for them.
Date: February 1, 2001
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies of induced radioactivity at the AGS

Description: With the goals of higher proton intensities, along with the many modes the AGS now runs and those being commissioned to run, we have begun detailed studies of the beam induced radioactivity in the AGS.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Brown, K.A. & Tanaka, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparative response of alluvium to Hopkinson bar and gas gun loading

Description: Standard explosive techniques used for dynamic testing of highly dispersive media materials do not produce data under conditions relevant to most real applications such as confinement of buried explosions or assessment of the effects of explosions on buried structures. We have developed techniques for testing soils dynamically at strain rates ranging from about 10/sup 2/ to about 10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/ in uniaxial strain using a Hopkinson bar. This admits direct comparison with data from gas gun tests where strain rates are in the range of 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ sec/sup -1/. This, in turn, permits the separation of inertial effects from direct strain-rate effects. In order to assist in evaluation of the results we have also developed a one dimensional microphysical model of soil. 5 refs., 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Gaffney, E.S. & Brown, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department