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Utility investments in low-income energy-efficiency programs

Description: In the increasingly competitive utility industry, it is imperative that equity programs be as cost-effective as possible. In some cases, this is accomplished by working in partnership with government programs such as the US Department of Energy`s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program. This paper provides an overview of the DSM and conservation programs being operated by utilities for low-income customers and describes the types of utility-government partnerships that exist.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scenarios of U.S. Carbon Reductions: Potential Impacts of Energy-Efficient and Low-Carbon Technologies by 2010 and Beyond

Description: This report presents the results of a study conducted by five US Department of Energy national laboratories that quantifies the potential for energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US. The stimulus for this study derives from a growing recognition that any national effort to reduce the growth of greenhouse gas emissions must consider ways of increasing the productivity of energy use. To add greater definition to this view, they quantify the reductions in carbon emissions that can be attained through the improved performance and increased penetration of efficient and low-carbon technologies by the year 2010. They also take a longer-term perspective by characterizing the potential for future research and development to produce further carbon reductions over the next quarter century. As such, this report makes a strong case for the value of energy technology research, development, demonstration, and diffusion as a public response to global climate change. Three overarching conclusions emerge from their analysis of alternative carbon reduction scenarios. First, a vigorous national commitment to develop and deploy cost-effective energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies could reverse the trend toward increasing carbon emissions. Along with utility sector investments, such a commitment could halt the growth in US energy consumption and carbon emissions so that levels in 2010 are close to those in 1997 (for energy) and in 1990 (for carbon). It must be noted that such a vigorous national commitment would have to go far beyond current efforts. Second, if feasible ways are found to implement the carbon reductions, the cases analyzed in the study are judged to yield energy savings that are roughly equal to or greater than costs. Third, a next generation of energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies promises to enable the continuation of an aggressive pace of carbon reductions over the next quarter century.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weatherization Works: Final Report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

Description: In 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation's largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year. The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it saves energy, lowers fuel bills, and improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years. The Program's mission is to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families--particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Substantial progress has been made, but the job is far from over. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reports that the average low-income family spends 12 percent of its income on residential energy, compared to only 3% for the average-income family. Homes where low-income families live also have a greater need for energy efficiency improvements, but less money to pay for them.
Date: February 1, 2001
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Energy-Related Inventions Program: An Empirical Analysis of 204 Inventions

Description: This report is an evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). It assesses the program's effectiveness and impacts, characterizes participating inventions and inventors, and identifies correlates of successful commercialization in order to suggest possible improvements. Seventy of the 204 ERIP inventions that were studied were successfully introduced into the market, accounting for more than $200M in sales from 1976 through 1984. During 1984, 921 full-time equivalent employees were supported directly by ERIP inventors or their licensees. (Estimates of indirect economic impacts are also contained in the report.) Data on patterns of fund raising clearly show a need for assistance by programs like ERIP. Commercially successful inventors shared several traits. They had less formal education, fewer patents, more work experience in small firms, more outside funding early in their work, more shared responsibility with others for invention development, more management experience, and greater previous experience with starting new businesses. Recommendations are made regarding: (1) priorities for allocating ERIP grants; (2) improved efficiency of the NBS/DOE operations; (3) delivery of technical and commercialization assistance to grant recipients; and (4) further evaluation research.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International energy efficiency and renewable energy resources on the Internet

Description: A variety of sources of information on energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are available on the Internet`s World Wide Web. These resources are sponsored and maintained by a myriad of organizations across the country and world. One expeditious way to access these resources is by using the U.S. Department of Energy`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN). This network is a user-friendly computer link to Internet based information on energy conservation and renewable energy technologies and techniques. Numerous international sources of information can be accessed through EREN including the International Energy Agency`s Centre for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET) and the Greenhouse Gas Technology Information Exchange (GREENTIE). CADDET`s Register of demonstrated energy technologies provides an extensive guide to energy efficient and renewable energy technologies, and GREENTIE`s Directory of supplier information helps users access technology providers and experts.
Date: October 1996
Creator: Brown, M. A. & Meyer, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Key findings of the national weatherization evaluation

Description: In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. The primary goal of the evaluation was to establish whether the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement, to reduce the heating and cooling costs for low-income families-particularly the elderly, persons with disabilities, and children by improving the energy-efficiency of their homes and ensuring their health and safety. Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed a five-part study which produced a series of documents evaluating the Program. The objective of this document is to summarize the findings of the five-part National Weatherization Evaluation. The five studies were as follows: (1) Network Study-this study characterized the weatherization network`s leveraging, capabilities, procedures, staff, technologies, and innovations; (2) Resources and Population Study-this study profiled low-income weatherization resources, the weatherized population, and the population remaining to be served; (3) Multifamily Study-this study described the nature and extent of weatherization activities in larger multifamily buildings; (4) Single-family Study-this study estimated the national savings and cost- effectiveness of weatherizing single-family and small multifamily dwellings that use natural gas or electricity for space heating; (5) Fuel-Oil Study-this study estimated the savings and cost-effectiveness of weatherizing single-family homes, located in nine northeastern states, that use fuel oil for space heating. This paper provides a brief overview of each study`s purposes, research methods and most important findings.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Berry, L.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

What has DSM achieved in California?

Description: Since the late 1980`s, the four largest California investor-owned utilities have initiated and expanded various demand-side management (DSM) programs designed to produce energy and capacity savings and to provide comprehensive services to their customers. This commitment to energy efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. The four utilities include: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E); San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E); and Southern California Edison (SCE), and Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas). This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. The report concludes that in aggregate the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980`s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy and demand impacts.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Mihlmester, P.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science and technology for a sustainable energy future: Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Description: Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Included are activities performed in the utilities, transportation, industrial, and buildings technology areas.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Vaughan, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Actual vs anticipated savings from DSM programs: An assessment of the California experience

Description: Since the late 1980`s, utilities in California have used demand-side management (DSM) extensively to achieve a variety of corporate and public policy goals. This commitment to ene efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. With restructuring of electric and gas markets underway in California, including recent cutbacks by the California utilities in their DSM program efforts, it is timely to review retrospectively the accomplishments of California`s DSM investments. This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. On average, the programs delivered 112% of the energy savings that were planned, and the typical program realized approximately 86% of the energy savings it was expected to deliver. Thus, the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy impacts. Among the 50 impact studies, lower realization rates are associated with residential-sector programs, relatively high ex-ante estimates of savings, and significant levels of free ridership.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Mihlmester, P.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feedback from users of energy efficiency information on the Internet: Analysis of the US CADDET home page

Description: This paper describes the US experience to date with providing energy efficiency information from the Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET) on the Internet. The paper begins by describing the way that information is displayed in the US CADDET home page system. Statistics are then provided on numbers and types of users of the home page. Next we describe the frequency with which different types of CADDET information have been accessed and summarize the feedback provided by users. Drawing on this experience with the US CADDET home page system, the authors conclude that energy efficiency information systems on the World Wide Web can contribute significantly to the goals of CADDET and other information outreach programs. However, to reach a wider range of audiences, Internet systems need to be supplemented by other dissemination efforts aimed at reaching individuals in countries and organizations that are not currently using Internet services. In addition, more personal and customized information sources are needed to provide users with the types of assistance guidance that may be required to translate knowledge of a technology`s technical financial performance, into a decision to adopt the technology.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Voss, M.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electricity savings among participants three years after weatherization in Bonneville's 1986 residential weatherization program

Description: To ensure proper assessment of its weatherization activities, the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has examined several cohorts of participants in various phases of its Long-Term Residential Weatherization Program (Long-Term RWP). Beginning in 1980, energy savings one, two, and three years after program participation have been evaluated. This study, which continues the series of Bonneville's ongoing evaluation of weatherization activities, examines electricity savings three years after weatherization in the 1986 Long-Term RWP. Electricity bills were weather-adjusted using the Princeton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). Normalized Annual Consumption (NAC) was calculated for each participant and control household for which data were available. Gross energy savings were calculated by subtracting a household's NAC for each postretrofit year (1986--87, 1986--88, and 1988--89) from its preretrofit NAC (1985--86). Household level data were aggregated and examined at the utility level allowing the calculation of average net savings, which is the difference between gross savings by nonparticipants and participants. Utility-level data were then weighted, based on the extent of each utility's participation in the Long-Term RWP in 1986, to allow the identification of overall program savings. 29 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: White, D.L. & Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Bonneville's 1988 and 1989 Residential Weatherization Program: A Northwest study of program dynamics

Description: This study continues the series of evaluations of the Bonneville Power Administration's long-term Residential Weatherization Program (RWP) by examining the energy saved by its 1988 and 1989 participants. The sample of participants for this study was drawn from 10 utilities covering the region's three climate zones. Six of these utilities were included in the 1988 RWP evaluation, and eight of them were included in the 1989 RWP evaluation. This study analyzes data on 356 participating households in 1988, 433 participants in 1989, and a comparison group of 1170 nonparticipants in 1988 and 1466 in 1989. Previous evaluations of Bonneville's earlier weatherization programs provide an historic context for analyzing program dynamics.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Brown, M.A. & White, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercializing government-sponsored innovations: Twelve successful buildings case studies

Description: This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies. 27 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. & Goel, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Bonneville`s 1988 and 1989 Residential Weatherization Program: A Northwest study of program dynamics

Description: This study continues the series of evaluations of the Bonneville Power Administration`s long-term Residential Weatherization Program (RWP) by examining the energy saved by its 1988 and 1989 participants. The sample of participants for this study was drawn from 10 utilities covering the region`s three climate zones. Six of these utilities were included in the 1988 RWP evaluation, and eight of them were included in the 1989 RWP evaluation. This study analyzes data on 356 participating households in 1988, 433 participants in 1989, and a comparison group of 1170 nonparticipants in 1988 and 1466 in 1989. Previous evaluations of Bonneville`s earlier weatherization programs provide an historic context for analyzing program dynamics.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Brown, M. A. & White, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of California DSM impact evaluation studies

Description: Over the past several years, four of the largest investor-owned California utilities have completed more than 50 evaluation studies designed to measure the energy and demand impacts of their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These four are: Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E), Southern California Edison (SCE), Southern California Gas (SoCalGas), and San diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E). These studies covered residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural DSM programs and provided a wealth of information on program impacts. The objective of this report is to summarize the results of these DSM evaluation studies in order to describe what DSM has achieved in California, to assess how well these achievements were forecast, and to compare the effectiveness of different types of DSM programs. This report documents the sizable investment made by the California utilities in their 1990--92 DSM programs. Between 1990 and 1992, the four utilities spent $772 million on energy-efficiency/conservation programs. This report also summarizes the realization rates estimated by the 50+ evaluation studies. Realization rates are defined as ex-post net savings estimates divided by ex-ante net savings estimates. Realization rates are summarized for 158 programs and program segments.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Brown, M. A. & Mihlmester, P. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study

Description: An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions ...
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P. & Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental plan for the Single-Family Study

Description: The national evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) consists of five separate studies. The Single-Family Study is one of three studies that will estimate program energy savings and cost effectiveness in principal WAP submarkets. This report presents the experimental plan for the Single-Family Study, which will be implemented over the next three years (1991--1993). The Single-Family Study will directly estimate energy savings for a nationally representative sample of single-family and small multifamily homes weatherized in the 1989 program year. Savings will be estimated from gas and electric utility billing records using the Princeton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). The study will also assess nonenergy impacts (e.g., health, comfort, safety, and housing affordability), estimate cost effectiveness, and analyze factors influencing these outcomes. For homes using fuels such as wood, coal, fuel oil, kerosene, and propane as the primary source of space conditioning, energy savings will be studied indirectly. The study will assemble a large nationally representative data base. A cluster sampling approach will be used, in which about 400 subgrantees are selected in a first stage and weatherized homes are selected in a second range. To ensure that the Single-Family Study is able to identify promising opportunities for future program development, two purposively selected groups of subgrantees will be included: (1) subgrantees that install cooling measures (such as more efficient air conditioning equipment or radiant barriers), and (2) exemplary subgrantees that use state-of-the-art technologies and service delivery procedures (such as advanced audit techniques, blower door tests, infrared scanners, extensive client education, etc.). These two groups of subgrantees will be analyzed to identify the most effective program elements in specific circumstances. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Berry, L.G.; Brown, M.A.; Wright, T. & White, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy-efficient buildings: Does the marketplace work?

Description: For a variety of reasons, U.S. households, businesses, manufacturers, and government agencies all fail to take full advantage of cost-effective, energy-efficiency opportunities. Despite a growing environmental ethic among Americans and a concern for energy independence, consumers in this country are underinvesting in technologies, products, and practices that would cut their energy bills. The result is a large untapped potential for improving energy productivity, economic competitiveness, environmental quality, and energy security. The thesis of this paper is that the marketplace for energy efficiency, in general, is not operating perfectly, and the marketplace for energy-efficient buildings, in particular, is flawed. The reasons for underinvestments in cost-effective, energy efficiency are numerous and complicated. They also vary from sector to sector: the principal causes of energy inefficiencies in agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation are not the same as the causes of inefficiencies in homes and office buildings, although there are some similarities. One of the reasons for these differences is that the structure of marketplace for delivering new technologies and products in each sector differs. Energy-efficiency improvements in the buildings sector is critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, since most of the energy consumed in buildings comes from the burning of fossil fuels. This paper therefore begins by describing energy use and energy trends in the U.S. buildings sector. Characteristics of the marketplace for delivering energy efficiency technologies and products are then described in detail, arguing that this marketplace structure significantly inhibits rapid efficiency improvements.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weatherization works: Final report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

Description: In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of its Weatherization Assistance Program, the nation`s largest residential energy conservation program. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five-part study. This document summarizes the findings of the evaluation. Its conclusions are based mainly on data from the 1989 program year (supplemented by data from 1991-92). The evaluation concludes that the Program meets the objectives of its enabling legislation and fulfills its mission statement. Specifically, it (1) saves energy, (2) lowers fuel bills, and (3) improves the health and safety of dwellings occupied by low-income people. In addition, the Program achieves its mission in a cost-effective manner based on each of three perspectives employed by the evaluators. Finally, the evaluation estimates that the investments made in 1989 will, over a 20-year lifetime, save the equivalent of 12 million barrels of oil, roughly the amount of oil added to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in each of the past several years.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. & Kinney, L.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scenarios of US carbon reductions potential impacts of energy technologies by 2010 and beyond

Description: This report presents the results of a study conducted by five US Department of Energy national laboratories that quantifies the potential for energy-efficient and low-carbon technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the United States. We quantify the reductions in carbon emissions that can be attained through the improved performance and increased penetration of efficient and low-carbon technologies by the year 2010. We also characterize the potential for future research and development to produce the further carbon reductions over the next quarter century.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Levine, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluating the economic, energy, and environmental impacts of a technology commercialization program

Description: This paper describes the results of the latest evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP), one of the longest-running commercialization assistance programs in the US. Four performance metrics are used to evaluate the Program: (1) the market entry of new products, (2) commercial sales, (3) energy savings, and (4) greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The methodology used to estimate each metric is described, and the strengths and weaknesses of the metrics are discussed. The results of the Program evaluation are compared with other published program metrics, suggesting the Program`s high success. Issues that must be addressed to fairly appraise public investments in technology commercialization programs are also highlighted.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Brown, M.A. & Rizy, C.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Energy-Related Inventions Program: Evaluation challenges and solutions

Description: This paper describes results of evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP), focusing on the methodological challenges faced by the evaluators and solutions implemented. Operated jointly by US DOE and NIST, ERIP is one of the longest running commercialization assistance programs in US. The evaluation suggest that ERIP is a cost-effective federal investment. By the end of 1994, 24% of ERIP technologies had entered the market, producing total cumulative sales of $961 million (1994 dollars). With $124 million in program appropriations 1975-94, ERIP has an 8:1 return. At least 757 job-years were directly supported by ERIP technologies in 1994, and 6, 646 job-years of employment have been created over the past decade. The sales and employment supported by ERIP technologies are associated with $4.4 million in 1994 federal tax returns. Many issues must be addressed to fairly appraise public investments in technology commercialization programs, such as the need to track the program participants for extended periods, complexities in accounting for spinoff technologies, determining the validity of program evaluations, and dealing with performance data that are dominated by a small number of highly successful technologies.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Brown, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department