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Pyrolysis and Combustion of Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN)

Description: Acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN) is formed from the thermal decomposition of a variety of cyclic, noncyclic, and polymeric nitrogen-containing compounds such as pyrrole and polyacrylonitrile. The pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile have been studied over the past 30 years to gain a more detailed understanding of the complex mechanisms involved in the release of nitrogen-containing compounds such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in fires and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in coal combustion. This report reviews the literature on the formation of HCN and NOx from the pyrolysis and combustion of acetonitrile and discusses the possible products found in an acetonitrile fire.
Date: May 22, 2002
Creator: Britt, P. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of organic-mineral matter interactions on thermal reaction pathways for coal model compounds

Description: Coal is a complex, heterogeneous solid that includes interdispersed mineral matter. However, knowledge of organic-mineral matter interactions is embryonic, and the impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction is incomplete. Clay minerals, for example, are known to be effective catalysts for organic reactions. Furthermore, clays such as montmorillonite have been proposed to be key catalysts in the thermal alteration of lignin into vitrinite during the coalification process. Recent studies by Hatcher and coworkers on the evolution of coalified woods using microscopy and NMR have led them to propose selective, acid-catalyzed, solid state reaction chemistry to account for retained structural integrity in the wood. However, the chemical feasibility of such reactions in relevant solids is difficult to demonstrate. The authors have begun a model compound study to gain a better molecular level understanding of the effects in the solid state of organic-mineral matter interactions relevant to both coal formation and processing. To satisfy the need for model compounds that remain nonvolatile solids at temperatures ranging to 450 C, model compounds are employed that are chemically bound to the surface of a fumed silica (Si-O-C{sub aryl}linkage). The organic structures currently under investigation are phenethyl phenyl ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OC{sub 6}H{sub 5}) derivatives, which serve as models for {beta}-alkyl aryl ether units that are present in lignin and lignitic coals. The solid-state chemistry of these materials at 200--450 C in the presence of interdispersed acid catalysts such as small particle size silica-aluminas and montmorillonite clay will be reported. Initial focus will be on defining the potential impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F. & Struss, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pyrolysis of simple coal model compounds containing aromatic carboxylic acids: Does decarboxylation lead to cross-linking?

Description: The thermolysis of two aromatic carboxylic acids 1,2-(3,3`-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane (2) have been investigated at 400{degree} C as models of carboxylic acids in low rank coals. The major decomposition pathway observed is decarboxylation, which mainly occurs by an ionic pathway. This decarboxylation route does not lead to any significant amount of coupling or high molecular weight products that would be indicative of cross-linking products in coal. The pyrolysis of 1 and 2 will be investigated under a variety of conditions that better mimic the enviromment found in coal to further delineate the role that decarboxylation plays in coal cross-linking chemistry.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Eskay, T.P.; Britt, P.F. & Buchanan, A.C. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal reaction studies of organic model compound-mineral matter interactions in solids

Description: The solid-state chemistry of silica-immobilized phenethyl phenyl ethers is being investigated in the presence of interdispersed aluininosilicates at temperatures relevant to coal processing to gain a better understanding of the impact of mineral matter on pyrolysis and liquefaction mechanisms. Results demonstrate the dramatic effect that aluminosilicates can have in altering the normal thermal reaction pathways for these models of ether linkages in lignin and low rank coals. An investigation of the chemistry of these model compounds at low temperatures (ca. 150-200{degrees}C) in the presence of aluminosilicates, including montmorillonite, is currently being investigated to delineate the chemical transformations that can occur during lignin maturation.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F. & Thomas, K.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanistic Investigation into the Decarboxylation of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids

Description: It has been proposed that carboxylic acids and carboxylates are major contributors to cross-linking reactions in low-rank coals and inhibit its thermochemical processing. Therefore, the thermolysis of aromatic carboxylic acids was investigated to determine the mechanisms of decarboxylation at temperatures relevant to coal processing, and to determine if decarboxylation leads to cross-linking (i.e., formation of more refractory products). From the thcrmolysis of simple and polymeric coal model compounds containing aromatic carboxylic acids at 250-425 �C, decarboxylation was found to occur primarily by an acid promoted ionic pathway. Carboxylate salts were found to enhance the decarboxylation rate, which is consistent with the proposed cationic mechanism. Thermolysis of the acid in an aromatic solvent, such as naphthalene, produced a small amount of arylated products (~5 mol%)), which constitute a low-temperature cross-link. These arylated products were formed by the rapid decomposition of aromatic anhydrides, which are in equilibrium with the acid. These anhydrides decompose by a free radical induced decomposition pathway to form atyl radicals that can add to aromatic rings to form cross-links or abstract hydrogen. Large amounts of CO were formed in the thennolysis of the anhydrides which is consistent with the induced decomposition pathway. CO was also formed in the thermolysis of the carboxylic acids in aromatic solvents which is consistent with the formation and decomposition of the anhydride. The formation of anhydride linkages and cross-links was found to be very sensitive to the reactions conditions. Hydrogen donor solvents, such as tetralin, and water were found to decrease the formation of arylated products. Silar reaction pathways were also found in the thermolysis of a polymeric model that contained aromatic carboxylic acids. In this case, anhydride formation and decomposition produced an insoluble polymer, while the O-methylated polymer and the non-carboxylated polymer produced a soluble thermolysis product.
Date: August 22, 1999
Creator: Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Eskay, T.P. & Mungall, W.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds

Description: Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F. & Buchanan, A.C. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermolysis of a polymer model of aromatic carboxylic acids in low-rank coal

Description: To compliment our current investigation into the role that decarboxylation of aromatic carboxylic acids plays in the low-temperature cross-linking of low-rank coals, we are investigating the thermolysis of a polymeric coal model compound to determine if the polymeric network structure of coal can alter the decarboxylation pathways. In this investigation, a bibenzylic polymer, poly-(m-xylylene-co-5-carboxy-m-xylylene), 1, was synthesized containing 2.3 carboxylic acids per 100 carbons, which is similar to that found in Zapp lignite. The pyrolysis of 1 was compared to poly-m-xylylene, 2, and the methyl ester of 1, 3, to determine if the carboxy group enhances cross-linking reactions. The major product from the pyrolysis of 1 at 375{degrees} C or 400{degrees} C for 1 h was a THF insoluble residue (60-75 wt%), while pyrolysis of 2 or the methyl ester of 1 produced only a THF soluble product. The mechanistic pathways leading to cross-linking will be discussed.
Date: March 1997
Creator: Mungall, W. S.; Britt, P. F. & Buchanan, A. C., III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Retrograde reactions in coal processing: The behavior of ether and sulfide model compounds

Description: Retrograde reactions that produce more refractory molecular structures are undesirable in coal liquefaction. The authors previously found that restricted mass transport, induced by immobilization on a silica support, promotes retrograde reactions for 1,2-diphenylethane (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) by both skeletal rearrangement and ring growth (cyclization-dehydrogenation) pathways involving free-radical intermediates. They are now examining the influence of heteroatoms on the retrograde pathways for the corresponding surface-immobilized ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) and sulfide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) model compounds at 275--350 C. Cyclization-dehydrogenation pathways are not detected for either model compound. However, retrograde skeletal rearrangements involving 1,2-phenyl shifts in C{sub 6}H{sub 5}XCH{center_dot}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} (X = O,S) are found to be significant under restricted diffusion, and for X = O, radical coupling at ring carbons to form benzylphenols is also observed as a major pathway. For surface-immobilized benzyl phenyl ether, the two retrograde processes account for ca. 50% of the thermolysis products, and also generate reactive hydroxyl and keto functionalities that can be involved in additional retrograde reactions.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F. & Skeen, J. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the role of aromatic carboxylic acids in cross-linking processes in low-rank coals

Description: In the pyrolysis and liquefaction of low-rank coals, low-temperature cross-linking reactions have been correlated with the loss of carboxyl groups and the evolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. It is not clearly understood how decarboxylation leads to cross-linking beyond the suggestion that decarboxylation could be a radical process that involves radical recombination or radical addition reactions. We have recently conducted a study of the pyrolysis of 1,2-(3,3{prime}-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane (1) and 1,2-(4,4{prime}-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane (2) and found that decarboxylation occurs readily between 350-425 {degrees}C with no evidence of coupling products or products representative of cross-links. We proposed that decarboxylation occurred primarily by an acid-promoted cationic pathway, and the source of acid was a second carboxylic acid. The decarboxylation of 1 and 2 was investigated in diphenyl ether and naphthalene as inert diluents. In each solvent, the rate of decarboxylation dropped by roughly a factor of 2 upon dilution from the neat liquid to ca. 0.4 mole fraction of acid, but further dilution had no effect on the rate. This could be a consequence of hydrogen bonding or an intramolecular protonation. Molecular mechanics calculations indicated that 1 and 2 can adopt an appropriate conformation for internal proton transfer from a carboxy group on one ring to the second aryl ring without a significant energy penalty. In addition, the dicarboxylic acid could internally hydrogen bond, which may further complicate the reaction mechanism. Therefore, we have conducted a study of the pyrolysis of a monocarboxybibenzyl, 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4-biphenyl)ethane (3), to determine if decarboxylation occurs by an ionic pathway in the absence of intramolecular pathways.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Eskay, T.P.; Britt, P.F. & Buchanan, A.C. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a technique for mercury speciation and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

Description: One element of concern to DOE is mercury. Mercury was used extensively at the DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee from 1950 to 1963 in the process of making lithium deuteride, a component of nuclear weapons. Although both the inorganic and organometallic forms of mercury are toxic to humans, the organic compounds are often more toxic. Since the toxicity of mercury is a function of its chemical form, an understanding of the interactions between commercially discharged mercury, naturally occurring mercury, and the environment in which they are present is vital. In this report, the authors have been investigating gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the analysis of both the organometallic and inorganic forms of mercury in the same environmental sample (e.g., solutions, soils, and sludges). Although gas chromatography is the classical technique for analyzing organic molecules, (e.g., organometallic compounds) little has been done on the analysis of inorganic compounds. In a previous publication, the authors described how a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber could be used to sample organomercurials from aqueous samples. An alkylation reaction was then carried out to transform chemically mercury nitrate into dimethylmercury; subsequent GC/MS analysis of this compound permitted quantification of the inorganic constituent. Subsequently, several different alkylation reagents have been synthesized that methylate any inorganic mercury compound to methylmercury iodide. Here, the authors report results on alkylation reaction time and the effect of pH on the population of the product.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Barshick, S.A.; Barshick, C.M.; Britt, P.F.; Vance, M.A. & Duckworth, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pyrolysis of coal model compounds containing aromatic carboxylic acids: The role of carboxylic acids in cross-linking reactions in low-rank coal

Description: The pyrolysis of 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2(4-biphenyl)ethane (1) diluted in 10-fold excess of naphthalene has been studied at 400 {degrees}C to investigate whether decarboxylation of aromatic carboxylic acids can lead to cross-linked products. The dominant mechanism for decarboxylation was found to be an acid-promoted ionic pathway that does not lead to cross-linking. However, a small amount of cross-linked products (i.e. naphthalene grafted onto decarboxylated 1) were formed. The yields of the cross-linked products were found to be decreased in the presence of a hydrogen donor solvent, tetralin, suggesting that these products were formed by a free-radical pathway. The mechanism for the formation of cross-linked products was proposed to occur from the formation and decomposition of anhydrides of 1 during pyrolysis.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Eskay, T.P.; Britt, P.F. & Buchanan, A.C. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pyrolysis Mechanisms of Aromatic Carboxylic Acids

Description: Although decarboxylation of carboxylic acids is widely used in organic synthesis, there is limited mechanistic information on the uncatalyzed reaction pathways of aromatic carboxylic acids at 300-400 {degrees} C. The pyrolysis mechanisms of 1,2-(3,3-dicarboxyphenyl)ethane, 1,2-(4,4-dicarboxylphenyl)ethane, 1-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4- biphenyl)ethane, and substituted benzoic acids have been investigated at 325-425 {degrees} C neat and diluted in an inert solvent. Decarboxylation is the dominant pyrolysis path. Arrhenius parameters, substituent effects, and deuterium isotope effects are consistent with decarboxylation by an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. Pyrolysis of benzoic acid in naphthalene, as a solvent, produces significant amounts of 1- and 2-phenylnaphthalenes. The mechanistic pathways for decarboxylation and arylation with be presented.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Britt, P.F.; Eskay, T.P. & Buchanan, A.C. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pyrolysis mechanisms of lignin model compounds

Description: The flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds was studied under conditions optimized for the production of liquid products to provide mechanistic insight into the reaction pathways that lead to product formation. The major reaction products can be explained by cleavage of the C-O either linkage by a free radial or concerted 1,2-elimination.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III & Cooney, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New approach to immobilization of coal-model compounds on silica using a calcium carboxylate linkage

Description: In an earlier report, the authors described efforts to study the hydrothermolysis of surface-immobilized coal model compounds by attaching 1-(4{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenylethane to the surface of fumed silica via a Si-OAr linkage using procedures developed by Buchanan, Poutsma and coworkers and heating the resultant material (SiO-DPE) under D{sub 2} pressure. Despite the successes noted here, they sought to find a method for constructing links between silica and organic materials which might better survive hydroliquefaction conditions. Attachment of long-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids to silica through Mg{sup ++} or Ca{sup ++} ions is a patented method for silica flotation which they thought might be adapted to their purposes. This preprint is a preliminary report on the preparation, thermolysis and hydrothermolysis of materials believed to have the general structure, SiO{sup {minus}}Ca{sup ++}{sup {minus}}O{sub 2}CAr.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Ramakrishnan, S.; Guthrie, R.D.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III & Davis, B.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contrasting retrogressive rearrangement pathways during thermolysis of silica-immobilized benzyl phenyl ether

Description: Many coal model compound studies have focused on the mechanisms of bond cleavage reactions, and the means to alter reaction conditions to promote such reactions. However, there has become increasing interest in elucidating mechanisms associated with retrogressive or retrograde reactions in coal processing, which involve the formation of refractory bonds. Retrograde reactions inhibit efficient thermochemical processing of coals into liquid fuels, which has been particularly well-documented for low rank coals where abundant oxygen-containing functional groups are thought to play a key role in the chemistry. Much less is known about retrogressive reactions for ether-containing model compounds. Radical recombination through ring coupling of phenoxy radicals in benzyl phenyl ether (BPE) is known to lead to more refractory diphenylmethane linkages to a limited extent. Since this chemistry may be attributed at least in part to cage recombination, it could be promoted in a diffusionally constrained environment such as in the coal macromolecule. Using silica-immobilization to simulate restricted diffusion in coal, the authors have found that retrogressive reactions can be promoted for certain hydrocarbon model compounds. The authors have now begun an examination of the thermolysis behavior of silica-immobilized benzyl phenyl ether at 275--325 C. The initial results indicate that two retrogressive reaction pathways, radical recombination and molecular rearrangement through Si-O-C linkage to the surface of PhOCH{center_dot}Ph, are promoted by restricted diffusion. Remarkably, the retrograde products typically account for 50 mol% of the thermolysis products.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F. & Skeen, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microsensors for In-situ Chemical, Physical, and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste

Description: A wide spread need exists for a portable, real-time, in-situ chemical, physical, and radiological sensors in characterization of mixed waste, ground water, contaminated soils and process streams. None of the currently available technologies offer a clear path to the development of sensors that are miniature, cost-effective, selective, highly sensitive with a wide dynamic range, and with the ability to work in air or liquid while providing chemical , physical, and radiological information. The goal of this project is to develop a single-sensor platform approach that is based on the recently discovered extreme sensitivity of microcantilever sensing using adsorption-induced forces. The objective of this research is to gain better understanding of the basic mechanism of adsorption-induced differential surface stress variation and to use this concept for developing sophisticated microsensors for chemical and radiological sensing in liquids.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, R.J.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Brown, G.M.; Dabestani, Reza & Britt, P.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microsensors for In-Situ Chemical, Physical, and Radiological Characterization of Mixed Waste

Description: The objective of this research program is to conduct the fundamental research to develop extremely sensitive and highly selective for chemical, physical, and radiological characterization of mixed waste and ground water using microcantilever platform. The microcantilever sensors have sensitivity in the range of parts-per-trillion. These sensors will be of great value to DOE for the safe and cost-effective in situ, real-time characterization of contaminated sites. The ability to detect and measure specific chemicals and radionuclides in real-time using miniature and inexpensive sensing device could result in considerable benefits with regard to both cost savings and safety issues. In addition, this approach can also lead to multi-element/multi target sensors using array approach. The selectivity of the sensor results from chemical modification of cantilevers using selective molecular recognition agents.
Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, R.J.; Brown, G.M.; Dabestani, R. & Britt, P.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring genetic and metabolic potential for in situ bioremediation: Mass spectrometry. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'A number of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites are contaminated with mixtures of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform,. perchloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, in situ microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup because it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in situ without producing toxic byproducts. A rapid screening method to determine the broad range metabolic and genetic potential for contaminant degradation would greatly reduce the cost and time involved in assessment for in situ bioremediation as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. In this project, the ORNL Organic Mass Spectrometry (OMS) group is developing mass-spectrometry-based methods to screen for the genetic and metabolic potential for assessment and monitoring of in situ bioremediation of DNAPLs. In close collaboration, Professor Mary Lidstrom''s group at the University of Washington is identifying short DNA sequences related to microbial processes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants. This work will lay the foundation for development of a field-portable mass-spectrometry-based technique for rapid assessment and monitoring of bioremediation processes on site.'
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Buchanan, M.V.; Hurst, G.B.; Britt, P.F.; McLuckey, S.A. & Doktycz, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring genetic and metabolic potential for in situ bioremediation: Mass spectrometry. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'A number of DOE sites are contaminated with dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene. At many of these sites, microbial bioremediation is an attractive strategy for cleanup, since it has the potential to degrade DNAPLs in-situ. A rapid screening method to determine the broad range potential of a site''s microbial population for contaminant degradation would greatly facilitate assessment for in-situ bioremediation, as well as for monitoring ongoing bioremediation treatment. Current laboratory-based treatability methods are cumbersome and expensive. In this project, the authors are developing methods based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization mass-spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to rapidly and accurately detect polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. In parallel, PCR primers to amplify DNA sequences from microbial genes involved in biodegradation of pollutants are being identified that are short enough to allow MALDI-MS detection. This work will lay the foundation for development of a field-portable MS-based technique for rapid assessment and monitoring of bioremediation processes on site. This report summarizes work after 1-1/2 years of a 3-year project. In this time, the authors have demonstrated MALDI-MS-based detection of signature bacterial PCR products (Hurst et al., 1998). A model system for interfacing MALDI-MS with PCR amplification is based on the pmoA gene for the active site subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase, a bacterial enzyme that can oxidize trichloroethylene. PCR primer pairs were designed to amplify relatively short segments (99 bases and 56 bases) of this gene in Type 1 and Type 2 methanotrophs. A rapid reverse-phase purification of the resulting PCR products allows MALDI-MS detection from a fraction of one 25-microliter PCR reaction. At this level of sensitivity, MALDI-MS has considerable potential to compete with existing electrophoresis and hybridization methods for detecting PCR products in this size range. To allow increased throughput, the PerSeptive Biosystems MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer allows automated ...
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Buchanan, M.V.; Hurst, G.B.; Doktycz, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Weaver, K.; Lidstrom, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups

Description: Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.
Date: March 21, 1999
Creator: Britt, P. F.; Buchanan, A. C., III & Martineau, D. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection and analysis of polymerase chain reaction products by mass spectrometry

Description: This paper describes recent and ongoing efforts to overcome some of the obstacles to more routine and robust application of MALDI-TOF to analysis of polymerase chain reaction products and other information- bearing nucleic acid molecules. Methods for purifying nucleic acid samples are described, as is the application of delayed extraction TOF mass spectrometry to analysis of short oligonucleotides.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Hurst, G. B.; Doktycz, M. J.; Britt, P. F.; Vass, A. A. & Buchanan, M. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department