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Particulate Emissions from a Pre-Emissions Control Era Spark-Ignition Vehicle: A Historical Benchmark

Description: This study examined the particulate emissions from a pre-emissions control era vehicle operated on both leaded and unleaded fuels for the purpose of establishing a historical benchmark. A pre-control vehicle was located that had been rebuilt with factory original parts to approximate an as-new vehicle prior to 1968. The vehicle had less than 20,000 miles on the rebuilt engine and exhaust. The vehicle underwent repeated FTP-75 tests to determine its regulated emissions, including particulate mass. Additionally, measurements of the particulate size distribution were made, as well as particulate lead concentration. These tests were conducted first with UTG96 certification fuel, followed by UTG96 doped with tetraethyl lead to approximate 1968 levels. Results of these tests, including transmission electron micrographs of individual particles from both the leaded and unleaded case are presented. The FTP composite PM emissions from this vehicle averaged 40.5 mg/mile using unleaded fuel. The results from the leaded fuel tests showed that the FTP composite PM emissions increased to an average of 139.5 mg/mile. Analysis of the particulate size distribution for both cases demonstrated that the mass-based size distribution of particles for this vehicle is heavily skewed towards the nano-particle range. The leaded-fuel tests showed a significant increase in mass concentration at the <0.1 micron size compared with the unleaded-fuel test case. The leaded-fuel tests produced lead emissions of nearly 0.04 g/mi, more than a 4-order-of-magnitude difference compared with unleaded-fuel results. Analysis of the size-fractionated PM samples showed that the lead PM emissions tended to be distributed in the 0.25 micron and smaller size range.
Date: June 19, 2000
Creator: Storey, John M.E.; Sluder, C. Scott; Blom, Douglas A. & Higinbotham, Erin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resolution Quality and Atom Positions in Sub-Angstrom Electron Microscopy

Description: Ability to determine whether an image peak represents one single atom or several depends on resolution of the HR-(S)TEM. Rayleigh's resolution criterion, an accepted standard in optics, was derived as a means for judging when two image intensity peaks from two sources of light (stars) are distinguishable from a single source. Atom spacings closer than the Rayleigh limit have been resolved in HR-TEM, suggesting that it may be useful to consider other limits, such as the Sparrow resolution criterion. From the viewpoint of the materials scientist, it is important to be able to use the image to determine whether an image feature represents one or more atoms (resolution), and where the atoms (or atom columns) are positioned relative to one another (resolution quality). When atoms and the corresponding image peaks are separated by more than the Rayleigh limit of the HR-(S)TEM, it is possible to adjust imaging parameters so that relative peak positions in the image correspond to relative atom positions in the specimen. When atoms are closer than the Rayleigh limit, we must find the relationship of the peak position to the atom position by peak fitting or, if we have a suitable model, by image simulation. Our Rayleigh-Sparrow parameter QRS reveals the ''resolution quality'' of a microscope image. QRS values greater than 1 indicate a clearly resolved twin peak, while values between 1 and 0 mean a lower-quality resolution and an image with peaks displaced from the relative atom positions. The depth of the twin-peak minimum can be used to determine the value of QRS and the true separation of the atom peaks that sum to produce the twin peak in the image. The Rayleigh-Sparrow parameter can be used to refine relative atom positions in defect images where atoms are closer than the Rayleigh limit of the HR-(S)TEM, ...
Date: February 15, 2005
Creator: O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F. & Blom, Douglas A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Performance Characteristics of the ORNL AdvancedMicroscopy Laboratory and JEOL 2200FS-AC Aberration-CorrectedSTEM/TEM

Description: At ORNL, the new Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) has recently been completed, with two aberration-corrected instruments installed, and two more planned in the near future to fill the 4-laboratory building. The installed JEOL 2200FS-AC has demonstrated aTEM information limit of 0.9A. This limit is expected given the measured instrument parameters (HT and OL power supply stabilities, beam energy spread, etc.), and illustrates that the environmental influences are not adversely affecting the instrument performance. In STEM high-angle annular dark-field (HA-ADF) mode, images of a thin Si crystal in<110>zone axis orientation, after primary aberrations in the illuminating beam were optimally corrected, showed a significant vibration effect. The microscope is fitted with three magnetically levitated turbo pumps (one on the column at about the specimen position,and two near floor level) that pump the Omega energy filter and detector chamber. These pumps run at 48,000 rpm, precisely equivalent to 800Hz. It was determined that the upper turbo pump was contributing essentially all of the 800Hz signal to the image, and in fact that the pump was defective. After replacing the pump with one significantly quieter than the original, the Si atomic column image and associated diffractogram(Fig. 4b) show a much-reduced effect of the 800Hz signal, but still some residual effect from the turbo pump. The upper pump will be removed from the main column to an adjacent frame on the floor, and will have a large-diameter, well-damped, pump line to the original connection to the column to effectively isolate the pump from the column. If the 800Hz signal results from mechanical vibrations, they will be damped, and if the signal results from acoustic coupling to the column, it can be damped by appropriate acoustic materials.
Date: February 15, 2005
Creator: Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; O'Keefe, Michael A. & Mishina, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

Description: John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.
Date: April 6, 2005
Creator: O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F. & Blom, Douglas A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

Description: Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.
Date: April 23, 2004
Creator: O'Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department