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Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

Description: A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Bickford, Dennis F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Devitrification behavior of SRL defense waste glass

Description: Simulated SRL waste was prepared with compositions varying in iron and aluminum content. Two batches with similar composition were produced with different amounts of reducing agent added. Samples were isothermally heat treated and used to derive time-temperature-transformation diagrams. Supplementary samples were cooled in a manner programmed to simulate the cooling curves of production canisters. Less than 10% total devitrification occurs during normal processing. However, when waste glass 165 was purposely devitrified, up to 30 volume percent total spinel and acmite formed. Formation of these species had minor effect on leachability in MCC-1 and accelerated leach tests. 20 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.
Date: November 1, 1983
Creator: Bickford, Dennis F. & Jantzen, Carol M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

Description: At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.
Date: July 13, 2001
Creator: Perez, Joseph M.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

Description: At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.
Date: July 13, 2001
Creator: Perez, Joseph M., Jr.; Bickford, Dennis F.; Day, Delbert E.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L.; Marra, Sharon L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department