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Evaluation of photoneutron production at high energy LINACS

Description: This report describes an estimate of neutron production at a 9 MeV LINAC, and the potential for photoactivation of materials present at the LINAC facility. It was found that only isotopes of U, W, Ta, and Pb had daughters whose activities might be measurable. The LINAC was found to be capable of producing in the neighborhood of 10{sup 10} neutrons/second from these heavy metals, and that subsequent neutron activation might be more of a concern. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron transport and capture in the concrete and steel found in the LINAC vault indicates that {sup 55}Fe may be produced in measurable quantities.
Date: April 24, 1995
Creator: Bell, Z.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monte Carlo study of neutronics properties of the modular storage geometry

Description: The modular storage vault (MSV) geometry was investigated for its effects on the spectrum of neutrons from the spontaneous and induced fission of plutonium. Zinc alloy and aluminum alloy plates that will house neutron detectors and weight sensors were included. It was found that because of the large number of captures by plutonium and the steel and concrete MSV structure, only 12% of the neutron spectrum in the vicinity of the detector position was thermalized and over half of the neutrons incident on the detector position have energy in excess of 100 keV. Based on this, it is recommended that both fast and slow neutron detectors be included in the instrumentation package if plutonium is to be stored an MSV structure. No differences in the neutron spectra were found with different zinc alloys. In addition, insufficient differences in the spectra were found when aluminum was substituted for zinc to warrant any recommendation for one material over the other.
Date: September 1995
Creator: Bell, Z. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detection of concealed mercury with thermal neutrons

Description: In the United States today, governments at all levels and the citizenry are paying increasing attention to the effects, both real and hypothetical, of industrial activity on the environment. Responsible modem industries, reflecting this heightened public and regulatory awareness, are either substituting benign materials for hazardous ones, or using hazardous materials only under carefully controlled conditions. In addition, present-day environmental consciousness dictates that we deal responsibly with legacy wastes. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities at which mercury was used or processed presents a variety of challenges. Elemental mercury is a liquid at room temperature and readily evaporates in air. In large mercury-laden buildings, droplets may evaporate from one area only to recondense in other cooler areas. The rate of evaporation is a function of humidity and temperature; consequently, different parts of a building may be sources or sinks of mercury at different times of the day or even the year. Additionally, although mercury oxidizes in air, the oxides decompose upon heating. Hence, oxides contained within pipes or equipment, may be decomposed when those pipes and equipment are cut with saws or torches. Furthermore, mercury seeps through the pores and cracks in concrete blocks and pads, and collects as puddles and blobs in void spaces within and under them.
Date: August 18, 1994
Creator: Bell, Z.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of using prompt neutron capture gamma rays to detect mercury

Description: This report describes a study to determine the feasibility to use neutrons to probe hidden spaces within buildings for the presence of mercury. The study was performed in four phases: First a search of the scientific literature was performed to ascertain the behavior of mercury subsequent to the capture of a thermal or near-thermal neutron. Second, a Monte Carlo investigation (using the code MCNP) of the effects of neutrons on materials expected to be found near and/or surrounding the mercury was undertaken. Third, a Monte Carlo study of the shielding and beam forming properties of various configurations of moderator material was started. Lastly, a Monte Carlo analysis of a likely field situation involving mercury behind 1 inch and 2 inch thicknesses of concrete was performed.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Bell, Z.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SmartShelf{trademark}: Report of activities for fiscal year 1997

Description: This report covers activities relating to the SmartShelf{trademark} project during the period October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997. During this year, project team members have advanced the state of both the hardware and software through a six-month-long test that exercised all hardware and nearly all software components. Second-generation node hardware was constructed and tested with the system and it was found that components supplied by Dallas Semiconductor did not meet the manufacturer`s specifications and were unstable. However, it was possible to work around this problem by rapidly redesigning the second-generation printed circuit board to use proven first-generation electronics and still fit inside the custom designed second-generation enclosure. Thus, the benefits realized by adopting the custom enclosure was not compromised. The software was improved by moving the user interface from modules developed with LabView to forms, queries, and reports developed with Microsoft Access and the structures of the software was modified to take better advantage of the dynamic data exchange (DDE) client-server architecture built into the Windows95 operating system and Access.
Date: September 26, 1997
Creator: Bell, Z.W. & Lawson, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HotSpotter? Neutron/Gamma Detector

Description: The HotSpotter{trademark} Neutron/Gamma Detector combines in a single detecting module high sensitivity to gamma rays up to 3 MeV and sensitivity to neutrons. Using a 15 mm cubic CdWO{sub 4} (cadmium tungstate) crystal mounted on a 25 mm photomultiplier, the instrument realizes a factor of 5 increased photopeak efficiency over NaI(Tl) at 1 MeV, and a factor of 2 improvement over CsI(Tl). The addition of a 0.5 mm layer of {sup 10}B- impregnated epoxy covering the crystal provides neutron sensitivity without sacrificing gamma ray spectroscopic characteristics. Neutrons are detected by the presence of the 478 keV gamma from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li* reaction. In this paper, we describe the electronics and software of the instrument, and some of its characteristics.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Bell, Z. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SmartShelf{trademark}: Report of activities for fiscal year 1996

Description: The SmartShelf{trademark} system is designated to maintain an up-to-the-minute inventory of containers or other assets. Through the use of Dallas Semiconductor touch memory devices affixed to containers and entrusted to authorized operators, the system can determine which operator added or removed which container and when the transaction occurred. Through the use of a PC-based data base system, reports of the current status of all containers and nodes can be generated in minutes. This report covers activities on the SmartShelf{trademark} project for the period 1 October 1995 through 30 September 1996. During this year, project team members have advanced the state of the hardware and software from rough prototypes to a working system ready for field trials.The project team has developed an intimate working knowledge of the hardware and software, and has become expert at implementations of Dallas Semiconductor touch memory devices. System hardware includes a desktop PC running LabView and Microsoft Access, and an STD-bus 8086 computer to monitor container storage locations (nodes). The STD-bus computer monitors up to 128 nodes, and responds to operator actions (adding or removing containers) within 10 seconds. The PC uses LabView software to query the STD-bus machine to obtain records of transactions, and to download configuration information. Microsoft Access is used to store the transactions and configuration data in a user-accessible form.
Date: December 5, 1996
Creator: Bell, Z.W.; Lawson, R.L. & Long, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Portable Detector FY 2000 Task 4 Completion Report

Description: The fabrication of boron-covered crystal scintillation detectors is described. Bulk boron-loaded epoxy material was cast and cut into 0.5 mm-thick wafers that were mounted on CdWO{sub 4} and CsI(Tl) crystals. The crystals were mounted on miniature photomultiplier tubes and gamma spectra were obtained with the detectors. The ability of these small detectors to produce spectra that can be analyzed to provide isotopic identification has been demonstrated. In addition, the detector can produce a signature indicating the presence of neutrons. The same miniature size of these detectors that makes them attractive for hand-held portable use, may be a limiting factor in their efficiency. The small size of the scintillation crystals makes them not as efficient as larger NaI(Tl) crystals simply by virtue of significantly decreased sensitive volume and surface area. It may be worthwhile to consider slightly larger crystals (approximately 15 mm cubic CdWO{sub 4}) mounted on rectangular photomultipliers in a detecting head connected to the electronics package by a signal cable.
Date: February 1, 2001
Creator: Bell, Z. W. & Moyer, M. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CdWO4-Boron FY 2000 Task 4 Completion Report

Description: The fabrication of boron-covered crystal scintillation detectors is described. Bulk boron-loaded epoxy material was cast and cut into 0.5 mm-thick wafers that were mounted on CdWO{sub 4} and CsI(Tl) crystals. The crystals were mounted on miniature photomultiplier tubes and gamma spectra were obtained with the detectors. The ability of these small detectors to produce spectra that can be analyzed to provide isotopic identification has been demonstrated. In addition, the detector can produce a signature indicating the presence of neutrons. The same miniature size of these detectors that makes them attractive for hand-held portable use, may be a limiting factor in their efficiency. The small size of the scintillation crystals makes them not as efficient as larger NaI(Tl) crystals simply by virtue of significantly decreased sensitive volume and surface area. It may be worthwhile to consider slightly larger crystals (approximately 15 mm cubic CdWO{sub 4}) mounted on rectangular photomultipliers in a detecting head connected to the electronics package by a signal cable.
Date: February 1, 2001
Creator: Bell, Z. W. & Moyer, M. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photoneutron source based on a compact 10 MeV betatron

Description: Accelerator-based photoneutron sources have enjoyed wide use and offer the advantages of long term stability, ease of control and absence of radioactive materials. The authors report here measurements of the yield of photoneutrons from a neutron generator using a compact betatron (466 kg total weight, 900 by 560 by 350 mm betatron dimensions) at the Institute of Introscopy of the Tomsk Polytechnic University. Electrons were accelerated to energies up to 10 MeV and produced a bremsstrahlung beam with a dose rate of 0.16 Gy/min (at 10 MeV, 1 meter from the bremsstrahlung target) to irradiate LiD, Be, depleted U, and Pb neutron-producing targets. The angular distributions of photoneutrons produced by bremsstrahlung beams were measured with a long counter and integrated to determine neutron yield. In addition, neutron time of flight spectra were recorded from all targets using a 15 meter flight path perpendicular to the photon beam. The maximum observed yields were 5.2 {times} 10{sup 4} n/rad/gram target obtained with LiD, 1.7 {times} 10{sup 4} n/rad/gram from Be, 3.3 {times} 10{sup 3} n/rad/gram from U, and 7.5 {times} 10{sup 2} n/rad/gram from Pb. Optimization of target dimensions, shape, and positioning is expected to increase the yield from the LiD target by a factor of 35. With the increased yield, this compact betatron-based system could find application in the interrogation of waste containers for fissile material.
Date: May 8, 1998
Creator: Bell, Z.W.; Chaklov, V.L. & Golovkov, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Digital Signal Processor Based Controller for Inventory Confirmation Using Mass-Spring Devices

Description: Successful inventory confirmation measurements in SNM storage monitoring scenarios require electronic systems that are capable of long-term, reliable operation. Reliability can be improved by using systems with a minimum of inaccessible active components. A resonant weight pad has been designed to determine item mass with only two passive components located at the SNM storage point. During operation, the resonant weight pad and the monitored item become a mass-spring system, whose resonant frequency is related to the item's mass. This paper describes a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) based control system that is capable of determining resonance and correlating it to a mass value. In addition, the control system provides a communication link between the weight pad and a host processor.
Date: June 1, 2002
Creator: Stinson, B. J. & Bell, Z. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superconducting Gamma/Neutron Spectrometer Task 1 Completion Report Evaluation of Candidate Neutron-Sensitive Materials

Description: A review of the scientific literature regarding boron- and lithium-containing compounds was completed. Information such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, superconductivity properties, physical and chemical characteristics, commercial availability, and recipes for synthesis was accumulated and evaluated to develop a list of neutron-sensitive materials likely to perform properly in the spectrometer. The best candidate borides appear to be MgB{sub 2} (a superconductor with T{sub c} = 39 K), B{sub 6}Si, B{sub 4}C, and elemental boron; all are commercially available. Among the lithium compounds are LiH, LiAl, Li{sub 12}Si{sub 7}, and Li{sub 7}Sn{sub 2}. These materials have or are expected to have high Debye temperatures and sufficiently low heat capacities at 100 mK to produce a useful signal. The responses of {sup 10}B and {sup 6}Li to a fission neutron spectrum were also estimated. These demonstrated that the contribution of scattering events is no more than 3% in a boron-based system and 1.5% in a lithium-based system. This project is concerned with the development of materials for use in a cryogenic neutron spectrometer and is complementary to work in progress by Labov at LLNL to develop a cryogenic gamma ray spectrometer. Refrigeration to 100 mK lowers the heat capacity of these materials to the point that the energy of absorbed gamma and x rays, nuclei scattered by fast neutrons, and ions from (n, {alpha}) reactions produce a measurable heat pulse, from which the energy of the incident radiation may be deduced. The objective of this project is the discovery, fabrication, and testing of candidate materials with which a cryogenic neutron spectrometer may be realized.
Date: June 20, 2002
Creator: Bell, Z.W. & Lamberti, V.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cryogenic Neutron Spectrometer Development

Description: Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors operating at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K have been developed for the last two decades, driven mostly by the need for ultra-high energy resolution (<0.1%) in X-ray astrophysics and dark matter searches [1]. The Advanced Detector Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed different cryogenic detector technologies for applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to nuclear science and non-proliferation. In particular, we have adapted cryogenic detector technologies for ultra-high energy resolution gamma-spectroscopy [2] and, more recently, fast-neutron spectroscopy [3]. Microcalorimeters are essentially ultra-sensitive thermometers that measure the energy of the radiation from the increase in temperature upon absorption. They consist of a sensitive superconducting thermometer operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state, where its resistance changes very rapidly with temperature such that even the minute energies deposited by single radiation quanta are sufficient to be detectable with high precision. The energy resolution of microcalorimeters is fundamentally limited by thermal fluctuations to {Delta}E{sub FWHM} {approx} 2.355 (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C{sub abs}){sup 1/2}, and thus allows an energy below 1 keV for neutron spectrometers for an operating temperature of T {approx} 0.1 K . The {Delta}E{sub FWHM} does not depend on the energy of the incident photon or particle. This expression is equivalent to the familiar (F{var_epsilon}E{sub {gamma}}){sup 1/2} considering that an absorber at temperature T contains a total energy C{sub abs}T, and the associated fluctuation are due to variations in uncorrelated (F=1) phonons ({var_epsilon} = k{sub B}T) dominated by the background energy C{sub abs}T >> E{gamma}. The rationale behind developing a cryogenic neutron spectrometer is the very high energy resolution combined with the high efficiency. Additionally, the response function is simple and the instrument is transportable. We are currently developing a fast neutron spectrometer with 0.1% energy resolution at 1 MeV neutron energy with an efficiency ...
Date: March 8, 2006
Creator: Niedermayr, T.; Hau, I. D.; Friedrich, S.; Burger, A.; Roy, U. N. & Bell, Z. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Brighter Screens for Nondestructive Digital X-ray Radiography

Description: Fine resolution, bright X-ray screens are needed for digital radiography and material characterization at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Current technology is simply not adequate for transferring high-energy X-ray images to visible light for demanding digital applications. Low energy radiography and especially emerging tomographic technologies are severely hampered for Y-12 nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications by dim screens with poor resolution. Also, the development of more advanced materials characterization techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is driven by a design agency desire for tighter specifications and more uniform materials. Brighter screens would allow us to probe materials on a finer scale, leading to a better understanding of material behavior. A number of X-ray screen materials were studied that would be suitable for direct replacement in existing digital imaging systems. Spectroscopic evaluations were first made for a several candidates and indicated that lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) would be a promising candidate for MeV images. A relative comparison of brightness at various energies was then completed which showed that cesium iodide (CsI) could increase brightness by over an order of magnitude. Since image quality is also important for better screens, the resolving capabilities of candidate materials were measured. Resolution measurements were completed at X-ray peak energies up to 420KeV with magnified optical imaging systems, and indicated that LSO and Industrial Quality Incorporated glass (IQI) exhibited higher resolution than the CsI screen. The results give a choice of materials that can be tailored to the particular test under consideration. If high-speed images are necessary and some resolution can be sacrificed, the CsI screen will be a good choice. The screen can be replaced by an IQI or LSO unit if higher resolution is needed later, for instance to focus in on a region of interest. A number of significant findings were obtained from ...
Date: September 15, 2003
Creator: Miller, Jr., A. C.; Bell, Z. W. & Carpenter, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Specific Heat Measurements of TiB(2)[subscript] and (6)[superscript]LiF from 0.5 to 30K

Description: The specific heats of TiB{sub 2} and {sup 6}LiF have been measured from 0.5 to 30 K as part of a larger project in the construction of a neutron spectrometer. For this application, the measured specific heats were used to extrapolate the specific heats down to 0.1 K with lattice, electronic, and Schottky equations for the respective samples. The resultant specific heat values at 0.1 K for TiB{sub 2} and {sup 6}LiF are 4.08 x 10{sup -4} {+-} 0.27 x 10{sup -4} J/K/mol and 9.19 x 10{sup -9} {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup -9} J/K/mol, respectively.
Date: March 28, 2005
Creator: Lang, B.E.; Marcus, H.D.; Woodfield, B.F.; Burger, A; Utupal, N.R; Lamberti, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Continuous Holdup Measurements with Silicon P-I-N Photodiodes

Description: We report on the behavior of silicon P-I-N photodiodes used to perform holdup measurements on plumbing. These detectors differ from traditional scintillation detectors in that no high-voltage is required, no scintillator is used (gamma and X rays are converted directly by the diode), and they are considerably more compact. Although the small size of the diodes means they are not nearly as efficient as scintillation detectors, the diodes' size does mean that a detector module, including one or more diodes, pulse shaping electronics, analog-to-digital converter, embedded microprocessor, and digital interface can be realized in a package (excluding shielding) the size of a pocket calculator. This small size, coupled with only low-voltage power requirement, completely solid-state realization, and internal control functions allows these detectors to be strategically deployed on a permanent basis, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for manual holdup measurements. In this paper, we report on the measurement of gamma and X rays from {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U contained in steel pipe. We describe the features of the spectra, the electronics of the device and show how a network of them may be used to improve estimates of inventory in holdup.
Date: May 1, 2002
Creator: Bell, Z.W.; Oberer, R.B.; Williams, J.A.; Smith, D.E. & Paulus, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary report on four Oak Ridge sensors for enhancing nuclear safeguards neutron detectors

Description: The need for monitoring weapons grade Pu in nuclear facilities worldwide was addressed with four radiation detector technologies being developed at Y-12 and ORNL. This paper describes experimental results of 4 Oak Ridge Sensors for Enhancing Nuclear Safeguards (ORSENS) neutron detector technologies and includes the potential application, cost, and advantages for each. These are a {sup 6}LiF- ZnS(Ag) thermal neutron scintillator coupled to a wavelength-shifting optical fiber, a CdWO{sub 4} based scintillating thermal neutron detector, a rhodium silicon thermal neutron detector, and a proton- recoil fast neutron detector.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Williams, J.A.; Clark, R.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Miller, V.C.; Ramsey, J.A.; Bell, Z.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron Detection with Cryogenics and Semiconductors

Description: The common methods of neutron detection are reviewed with special attention paid to the application of cryogenics and semiconductors to the problem. The authors' work with LiF- and boron-based cryogenic instruments is described as well as the use of CdTe and HgI{sub 2} for direct detection of neutrons.
Date: March 10, 2005
Creator: Bell, Z. W.; Carpenter, D. A.; Cristy, S. S. & Lamberti, V. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

Description: Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.
Date: May 12, 2003
Creator: Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M. & Sloop, F.V.Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals for Materials Control and Accountability

Description: The ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals system, a continuously monitored fiber optic, active seal technology, provides real-time tamper indication for large arrays of storage containers. The system includes a PC running the RFAS software, an Immediate Detection Unit (IDU), an Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR), links of fiber optic cable, and the methods and devices used to attach the fiber optic cable to the containers. When a breach on any of the attached fiber optic cable loops occurs, the IDU immediately signals the connected computer to control the operations of an OTDR to seek the breach location. The ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals System can be adapted for various types of container closure designs and implemented in almost any container configuration. This automatic protection of valued assets can significantly decrease the time and money required for surveillance. The RFAS software is the multi-threaded, client-server application that monitors and controls the components of the system. The software administers the security measures such as a two-person rule as well as continuous event logging. Additionally the software's architecture provides a secure method by which local or remote clients monitor the system and perform administrative tasks. These features provide the user with a robust system to meet today's material control and accountability needs. A brief overview of the hardware, and different hardware configurations will be given. The architecture of the system software, and its benefits will then be discussed. Finally, the features to be implemented in future versions of the system will be presented.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Richardson, G. D.; Younkin, J. R. & Bell, Z. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron Detection with a Cryogenic Spectrometer

Description: Cryogenic calorimeters are used for x-ray detection because of their exquisite energy resolution and have found application in x-ray astronomy, and the search for dark matter. These devices operate by detecting the heat pulse produced by ionization in an absorber cooled to temperatures below 1 K. Such temperatures are needed to lower the absorber's heat capacity to the point that the deposition of even a few eV results in a measurable temperature excursion. Typical absorbers for dark matter measurements are massive Si or Ge crystals, and, with Ge, have achieved a resolution of 650 eV at 10 keV. Chow, et al., report the measurement of the 60 keV emission from {sup 241}Am with 230 eV resolution using a superconducting tin absorber. Cunningham, et al., also using a superconducting tin absorber, have recently reported a four-fold improvement over Chow. With such results being reported from the x- and gamma-ray world it is natural to examine the possibilities for cryogenic neutron spectroscopy. Such a detector would operate by detecting the heat pulses caused by neutron capture and scattering. To date, {sup 6}LiF has been the absorber of choice because relatively large crystals can be grown, and it is an insulating material with low heat capacity. Silver reports the fabrication of a {sup 6}LiF spectrometer operating at 328 mK and achieving a resolution of 39 keV. De Marcillac reports the fabrication of a spectrometer operating at 80 mK and achieving 16 keV resolution when bombarded with 5 MeV alpha particles. In this paper, we report preliminary results with a TiB{sub 2} absorber exposed to thermal neutrons. In contrast to lithium, whose chemistry selects for LiF as the absorber, boron offers a rich chemistry from which to select materials with high boron content. We will discuss the considerations governing the choice of absorber material ...
Date: June 23, 2003
Creator: Bell, Z.W.; Lamberti, V.E.; Carpenter, D.A. & Cristy, S.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automated Systems for Safeguarding and Accountancy of Stored Nuclear Material (for proceedings of ESARDA 21st Annual Meeting, Sevilla, Spain May 4-6, 1999

Description: Oak Ridge has developed several sensor systems that are capable of providing unattended monitoring of the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials. These systems include the Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System (CAVISTM), SmartShelfTM, and the ReflectoActive Seal System TM. Each of these systems can be implemented independently or may be integrated with existing systems through the Graphical Facility Information Center or GraFICTM software package. GraFICTM is a versatile software package designed to operate in a distributed computing environment. GraFICTM can monitor and report all item and facility activity from the various sensors and systems to an unlimited number of authorized remote clients through a common interface. The software also contains an Intelligent Facility Management (lFM) package that helps storage facility managers with space planning, records management, item location, and variety of other facility specific needs. Results and details from several system deployments will be described, along with the specific features and possible uses of each system.
Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Baldwin, K. M.; Bell, Z. W.; Dunigan, J. J.; Gaby, J. E.; Hickerson, T. W.; Lawson, R. L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department