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Status of rod consolidation

Description: Two of the factors that need to be taken into account with rod consolidation are (1) the effects on rods from their removal from the fuel assembly and (2) the effects on rods as a result of the consolidation process. Potential components of both factors are described in the report. Discussed under (1) are scratches on the fuel rod surfaces, rod breakage, crud, extended burnup, and possible cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen injection at BWRs. Discussed under (2) are the increased water temperature (less than 10/sup 0/C) because of closer packing of the rods, formation of crevices between rods in the close-packed mode, contact with dissimilar metals, and the potential for rapid heating of fuel rods following the loss of water from a spent fuel storage pool. Another factor that plays an important role in rod consolidation is the cost of disposal of the nonfuel-bearing components of the fuel assembly. Also, the dose rate from the components - especially Inconel spacer grids - can affect the handling procedures. Several licensing issues that exist are described. A list of recommendations is provided. 98 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1985
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Categorization of failed and damaged spent LWR (light-water reactor) fuel currently in storage

Description: The results of a study that was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute are described in this report. The purpose of the study was to (1) estimate the number of failed fuel assemblies and damaged fuel assemblies (i.e., ones that have sustained mechanical or chemical damage but with fuel rod cladding that is not breached) in storage, (2) categorize those fuel assemblies, and (3) prepare this report as an authoritative, illustrated source of information on such fuel. Among the more than 45,975 spent light-water reactor fuel assemblies currently in storage in the United States, it appears that there are nearly 5000 failed or damaged fuel assemblies. 78 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1987
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of rod consolidation, 1988

Description: It is estimated that the spent fuel storage pools at some domestic light-water reactors will run out of space before 2003, the year that the US Department of Energy currently predicts it will have a repository available. Of the methods being studied to alleviate the problem, rod consolidation is one of the leading candidates for achieving more efficient use of existing space in spent fuel storage pools. Rod consolidation involves mechanically removing all the fuel rods from the fuel assembly hardware (i.e., the structural components) and placing the fuel rods in a close-packed array in a canister without space grids. A typical goal of rod consolidation systems is to insert the fuel rods from two fuel assemblies into a canister that has the same exterior dimensions as one standard fuel assembly (i.e., to achieve a consolidation or compaction ratio of 2:1) and to compact the nonfuel-bearing structural components from those two fuel assemblies by a factor of 10 to 20. This report provides an overview of the current status of rod consolidation in the United States and a small amount of information on related activities in other countries. 85 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rod consolidation at the West Valley Demonstration Project

Description: A rod consolidation demonstration with irradiated pressurized water reactor fuel was recently conducted by personnel from Nuclear Assurance Corporation and West Valley Nuclear Services Company at the West Valley Demonstration Project in West Valley, New York. The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling all of the fuel rods from six fuel Assemblies. In general, the rod pulling proceeded smoothly. The highest compaction ratio attained was 1:8:1. Among the total of 1074 fuel rods were some known degraded rods (they had collapsed cladding, a result of in-reactor fuel densification), but no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. One aim was to gather information on the effect of rod consolidation operations on the integrity of the fuel rods during subsequent handling and storage. Another goal was to collect information on the condition and handling of intact, damaged, and failed fuel that has been in storage for an extended period. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.
Date: December 1, 1986
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rod consolidation of RG and E's (Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation) spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuel

Description: The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling the fuel rods from five fuel assemblies from Unit 1 of RG and E's R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant. Slow and careful rod pulling efforts were used for the first and second fuel assemblies. Rod pulling then proceeded smoothly and rapidly after some minor modifications were made to the UST and D consolidation equipment. The compaction ratios attained ranged from 1.85 to 2.00 (rods with collapsed cladding were replaced by dummy rods in one fuel assembly to demonstrate the 2:1 compaction ratio capability). This demonstration involved 895 PWR fuel rods, among which there were some known defective rods (over 50 had collapsed cladding); no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. However, one of the rods with collapsed cladding unexplainably broke during handling operations (i.e., reconfiguration in the failed fuel canister), subsequent to the rod consolidation demonstration. The broken rod created no facility problems; the pieces were encapsulated for subsequent storage. Another broken rod was found during postdemonstration cutting operations on the nonfuel-bearing structural components from the five assemblies; evidence indicates it was broken prior to any rod consolidation operations. During the demonstration, burnish-type lines or scratches were visible on the rods that were pulled; however, experience indicates that such lines are generally produced when rods are pulled (or pushed) through the spacer grids. Rods with collapsed cladding would not enter the funnel (the transition device between the fuel assembly and the canister that aids in obtaining high compaction ratios). Reforming of the flattened areas of the cladding on those rods was attempted to make the rod cross sections more nearly circular; some of the reformed rods passed through the funnel and into the canister.
Date: May 1, 1987
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage

Description: The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some factors to consider in handling and storing spent fuel

Description: This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Behavior of Spent Fuel in Storage Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Wet storage experience has been summarized earlier in several other reports. This report summarizes pertinent items noted during FY 1985 concerning recent developments in the handling and storage of spent fuel and associated considerations. The subjects discussed include recent publications, findings, and developments associated with: (1) storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools, (2) extended-burnup fuel, (3) fuel assembly reconstitution and reinsertion, (4) rod consolidation, (5) variations in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's definition of failed fuel, (6) detection of failed fuel rods, and (7) extended integrity of spent fuel. A list of pertinent publications is included.
Date: November 1, 1985
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel performance annual report for 1986

Description: This annual report, the ninth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1986 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included. 550 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1988
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Wu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel performance annual report for 1985

Description: This annual report, the eighth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1985 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.
Date: February 1, 1987
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Wu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel performance annual report for 1981. [PWR; BWR]

Description: This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.
Date: December 1, 1982
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Tokar, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel performance: Annual report for 1987

Description: This annual report, the tenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1987 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulator Commission evaluations are included. 384 refs., 13 figs., 33 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Wu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

West Valley facility spent fuel handling, storage, and shipping experience

Description: The result of a study on handling and shipping experience with spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The purpose of the study was to document the experience with handling and shipping of relatively old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel that has been in pool storage at the West Valley facility, which is at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York and operated by DOE. A subject of particular interest in the study was the behavior of corrosion product deposits (i.e., crud) deposits on spent LWR fuel after long-term pool storage; some evidence of crud loosening has been observed with fuel that was stored for extended periods at the West Valley facility and at other sites. Conclusions associated with the experience to date with old spent fuel that has been stored at the West Valley facility are presented. The conclusions are drawn from these subject areas: a general overview of the West Valley experience, handling of spent fuel, storing of spent fuel, rod consolidation, shipping of spent fuel, crud loosening, and visual inspection. A list of recommendations is provided. 61 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel performance annual report for 1983. Volume 1

Description: This annual report, the sixth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1983 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.
Date: March 1, 1985
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Dunenfeld, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel performance annual report for 1984. Volume 2

Description: This annual report, the seventh in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1984 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included. 279 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1986
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Dunenfeld, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of fuel concepts. [BWR; PWR]

Description: The relative merits of various LWR UO/sub 2/ fuel concepts with the potential for improved power-ramping capability were qualitatively assessed. In the evaluation, it was determined that of the various concepts being considered, those that presently possess an adequately developed experience base include annular pellets, cladding coated with graphite on the inner surface, and packed-particle fuel. Therefore, these were selected for initial evaluation as part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program. For this program, graphite-coated cladding is being used in conjunction with annular pellet fuel as one of the concepts with the anticipation of gaining the advantage of the combined improvements. The report discusses the following: the criteria used to evaluate the candidate fuel concepts; a comparison of the concepts selected for irradiation with the criteria, including a general description of their experience bases; and a general discussion of other candidate concepts, including identifying those which may be considered for out-of-reactor evaluation as part of this program, those for which the results of other programs will be monitored, and those which have been deleted from further consideration at this time.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Barner, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wet storage integrity update

Description: This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.
Date: September 1, 1983
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Johnson, A.B. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wet storage in the USA: recent experience and directions

Description: Wet storage has been the only licensed option for spent fuel management for US commercial power reactor operators, except for a period of commercial reprocessing at the Nuclear Fuel Services facility, 1965-71. Developments are underway to bring dry storage to licensed status on the US by mid-1986. However, wet storage will remain the predominant storage method, at least beyond the turn of the century. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 establishes current US policy regarding responsibilities for spent fuel management. The Nuclear Waste Confidence Rulemaking proceedings address the viability of extended wet storage for US reactors. US utilities have moved aggressively to implement optimized utilization of wet storage technology, assisted in some areas by federal programs. This paper summarizes US policy and regulatory aspects of wet storage and the status of several wet storage technology developments, including: dense racking, double tiering, credit for burnup in rack designs, transshipment, impacts of extended burnup, rod consolidation, and pool decommissioning.
Date: March 1, 1986
Creator: Klein, K.; Johnson, A.B. Jr. & Bailey, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

Description: A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Berting, F.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems

Description: Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1990
Creator: Bailey, W.J. & Berting, F.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel Performance Annual Report for 1980

Description: This annual report, the third in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance in conmercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel surveillance programs and operating experience, fuel performance problems, and fuel design changes are provided. References to additional, more detailed, information and related NRC evaluation are included.
Date: December 1, 1981
Creator: Bailey, W. J.; Rising, K. H. & Tokar, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department