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Proceedings of the sixth Berkeley workshop on distributed data management and computer networks

Description: A distributed data base management system allows data to be stored at multiple locations and to be accessed as a single unified data base. In this workshop, seventeen papers were presented which have been prepared separately for the energy data base. These items deal with data transfer, protocols and management. (GHT)
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy management: a program of energy conservation for the community college facility. [Handbook]

Description: This handbook developes helps for assessing and improving the energy efficiency of the community-college facility. The TEEM approach (Total Educational Energy Management) is a labor-intensive approach which requires the commitment and participation of all segments of the college community. The TEEM program presented here defines a series of tasks selected, ordered, and implemented in such a way as to achieve two basic objectives: (1) reducing campus energy requirements, and (2) meeting those reduced energy requirements more efficiently without adversely affecting the quality of educational programs. This guide to large-scale energy conservation on college campuses includes step-by-step procedures for establishing a program task force, defining specific tasks, and assigning responsibilities. Action plans are developed, energy consumption monitored, goals set, and conservation measures implemented. A series of appendices provides more detailed information, charts, and worksheets related to all aspects of energy use. The TEEM program provides the basic structure for achieving a significant reduction in campus energy costs.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of particle properties. Particle Data Group. [Tables, diagrams, update, evaluation, averaging, summary]

Description: This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group (Rev. Mod. Phys. 48 (1976) No. 2, Part II; and Supplement, Phys. Lett. 68B (1977) 1). Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available.
Date: April 1, 1978
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress Report No. 69. Dec. 15, 1948 to Jan. 15, 1949

Description: This is the progress report for the University of California, Radiation Laboratory for December 15, 1948-January 15, 1949. It discusses the following: (1) Bevatron; (2) 184-inch Cyclotron Program; (3) 60-inch Cyclotron Program; (4) Synchrotron Operation; (5) Linear Accelerator and Van de Graaff Operation; (6) Experimental Physics; (7) Theoretical Physics, (8) Isotope Separation; (9) Chemistry Departments; (10) Medical Physics; and (11) Health Physics and Chemistry.
Date: January 30, 1949
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monthly Progress Report No. 61 for May, 1948

Description: This is the University of California, Radiation Laboratory monthly progress report for May 1948. It discusses the following: (1) 184-inch Cyclotron Program; (2) 60-inch Cyclotron Program; (3) Synchrotron Program; (4) Linear Accelerator Program; (5) Experimental Physics; (6) Theoretical Physics, (7) Isotope Separation Program; (8) Chemistry Departments; (9) Medical Physics; and (10) Health Physics and Chemistry.
Date: May 31, 1948
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress Report No. 63 June 15-July 15, 1948

Description: This is the University of California, Radiation Laboratory progress report for June 15-July 15, 1948. It discusses the following: (1) 184-inch Cyclotron Program; (2) 60-inch Cyclotron Program; (3) Synchrotron Program; (4) Linear Accelerator Program; (5) Experimental Physics; (6) Theoretical Physics, (7) Isotope Separation Program; (8) Chemistry Departments; (9) Medical Physics; and (10) Health Physics and Chemistry.
Date: July 30, 1948
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress Report for 1947

Description: The year 1947 has witnessed the dawn of a new era of atomic science, a flowering of fundamental knowledge of the nature of matter which appears to be unsurpassed even by that period of the 1930's which led to the age of plutonium. A great new cyclotron, an atom-smasher ten times more powerful than the one which brought plutonium into the world, has carried mankind over a new horizon of sub-atomic space. It has brought scientists at last to grips with the infinitely small and rapid forces, until now beyond reach, which operate within the incredibly tiny distances of nuclear space. On the new energy frontier created by the giant machine, now laws govern nuclear reactions. methods are at hand, heretofore unavailable, which permit the measurement and determination of the nature of sub-atomic forces. Under ultra-high energy bombardment, the nucleus presents a different appearance from the nucleus of Bohr and Rutherford, the nucleus of atomic energy fission. The new exploration of the atom has been sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission with the giant, new 4000-ton cyclotron in the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California. This is the thirdmajor machine built by the Director of the Laboratory and inventor of the cyclotron, Professor Ernest O. Lawrence. Whether the new knowledge will be of immediate practical consequence cannot now be predicted. Nor could Professor Lawrence predict, when in 1934 he established a new atomic energy range for that day with his first cyclotron, that the fundamental knowledge he pursued would be climaxed with the discovery of plutonium. What can be predicted is this: without the new basic knowledge, practical atomic developments of the future would be limited to the applicability of the fundamental information which made possible the initial release of atomic energy. In short, the nation's atomic potential has ...
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monthly Progress Report No. 57 for January 1948

Description: This report gives a short summary of the work done in the following fields for the month of January 1948: (1) 184-inch cyclotron; (2) 60-inch cyclotron; (3) synchrotron; (4) linear accelerator; (5) experimental physics; (6) theoretical physics; (7) isotope research; (8) chemistry; (9) medical physics; and (10) health physics and chemistry.
Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970

Description: Papers are presented for the following topics: (1) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Properties - (a) Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radioactivity; (b) Nuclear Reactions and Scattering; (c) Nuclear Theory; and (d) Fission. (2) Chemical and Atomic Physics - (a) Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy; and (b) Hyperfine Interactions. (3) Physical, Inorganic, and Analytical Chemistry - (a) X-Ray Crystallography; (b) Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; (c) Radiation Chemistry; and (d) Chemical Engineering. (4) Instrumentation and Systems Development.
Date: May 1, 1971
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion Time Histories for the UC Berkeley Campus

Description: Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.
Date: June 3, 2003
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exascale for Energy: The Role of Exascale Computing in Energy Security

Description: How will the United States satisfy energy demand in a tightening global energy marketplace while, at the same time, reducing greenhouse gas emissions? Exascale computing -- expected to be available within the next eight to ten years ? may play a crucial role in answering that question by enabling a paradigm shift from test-based to science-based design and engineering. Computational modeling of complete power generation systems and engines, based on scientific first principles, will accelerate the improvement of existing energy technologies and the development of new transformational technologies by pre-selecting the designs most likely to be successful for experimental validation, rather than relying on trial and error. The predictive understanding of complex engineered systems made possible by computational modeling will also reduce the construction and operations costs, optimize performance, and improve safety. Exascale computing will make possible fundamentally new approaches to quantifying the uncertainty of safety and performance engineering. This report discusses potential contributions of exa-scale modeling in four areas of energy production and distribution: nuclear power, combustion, the electrical grid, and renewable sources of energy, which include hydrogen fuel, bioenergy conversion, photovoltaic solar energy, and wind turbines. Examples of current research are taken from projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science at universities and national laboratories, with a special focus on research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Date: July 15, 2010
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

Description: Planning a rational energy future requires anticipating the environmental consequences of various technologies. This is difficult to do with precision as the effects of pollutants are often determined by interactions between and among complex physical (abiotic) and biological (biotic) systems. A given pollutant may affect human beings through direct exposure or indirectly through inducing changes to biological systems which humans need to utilize. The concentration of a toxin in the food chain or the destruction of organisms necessary for the maintenance of high quality water are examples of indirect effects. Pollutants can be transformed and/or degraded as they establish residence in various components of an ecosystem. Anticipation and amelioration of pollutant effects involves the integration of a vast range of data. This data includes: (1) physical and chemical characterization cf the pollutant as it enters the environment; (2) determining effects on the various components (biotic and abiotic) within the context of the functioning ecosystem of interest; (3) transformation in movements and/or degradation of the pollutant within that ecosystem and within specific organisms and physical components; and (4) determining a detailed biochemical and biological picture of the interactions of pollutants with particular organisms and/or their cellular components judged salient for various processes. The major programs described below are designed to answer parts of the above fundamental questions relevant to pollutants generated by energy related technologies. Their emphasis is on anticipating consequences to the biological components of various ecosystems. The work ranges from studies involving parts of a single cell (the membranes) to studies involving the whole ecosystem (in the pelagic zone of a lake). The programs take advantage of expertise and technical abilities present at LBL. Two small exploratory projects which were of brief duration and not related to anticipating biological effects of pollutants are included in this section. They concern ...
Date: October 1, 1980
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

Description: The research reported in this volume was undertaken during FY 1979 within the Energy & Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This volume will comprise a section of the Energy & Environment Division 1979 Annual Report, to be published in the summer of 1980. Work reported relate to: thermal performance of building envelopes; building ventilation and indoor air quality; a computer program for predicting energy use in buildings; study focused specifically on inherently energy intensive hospital buildings; energy efficient windows and lighting; potential for energy conservation and savings in the buildings sector; and evaluation of energy performance standards for residential buildings.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

Description: Solar energy has become a major alternative for supplying a substantial fraction of the nation's future energy needs. The Department of Energy (DOE) supports activities ranging from the demonstration of existing technology to research on future possibilities; and at LBL projects are in progress which span that range of activities. To assess various solar applications it is important to quantify the solar resource. In one project, LBL is cooperating with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in the implementation and operation of a solar radiation data collection network in northern California. Special instruments have been developed and are now in use to measure the solar and circumsolar (around the sun) radiation. These measurements serve to predict the performance of solar designs which use focusing collectors (mirrors or lenses) to concentrate the sunlight. Efforts are being made to assist DOE in demonstrating existing solar technology. DOE's San Francisco Operations Office (SAN) has been given technical support for its management of commercial-building solar demonstration projects. The installation of a solar hot water and space heating system on an LBL building established model techniques and procedures as part of the DOE Facilities Solar Demonstration Program. Technical support is also provided for SAN in a DOE small scale technology pilot program in which grants are awarded to individuals and organizations to develop and demonstrate solar technologies appropriate to small scale use. In the near future it is expected that research will exert a substantial impact in the areas of solar heating and cooling. An absorption air conditioner is being developed that is air cooled yet suitable for use with temperatures available from flat plate collectors. With inexpensive but sophisticated micro-electronics to control their operation, the performance of many-component solar heating and cooling systems may be improved, and work is under way to develop such ...
Date: October 1, 1980
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cable Measuring Engine Operation Procedures

Description: The Cable Measuring Engine (CME) is a tool which measures and records the cable dimensions in a nondestructive fashion. It is used in-line with the superconductor cable as it is being made. The CME is intended to be used as a standard method of measuring cable by the various manufacturers involved in the cable process.
Date: July 11, 1997
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geotechnical Assessment and Instrumentation Needs for Nuclear Waste Isolation in Crystalline and Argillaceous Rocks Symposium

Description: Today there exists in the United States a large volume of nuclear wastes that result from both military and commercial activities. The United States has to date placed major emphasis on disposal in only one rock type--salt--whereas other nations have considered other rock types, such as granite in England and Sweden and clays in Belgium. No comprehensive evaluation of isolation in rocks other than salt has been made in the United States, and it is most appropriate that other rock types be evaluated both for constructing disposal sites in areas devoid of salt and also for having alternative waste management plans in case substantial problems are encountered in using salt as a disposal medium. To evaluate the state-of-the-art, research needs, and research priorities related to waste disposal in largely-impermeable rocks, scientists and engineers working on geologic aspects of nuclear waste disposal were brought together. The Geotechnical Assessment and Instrumentation Needs (GAIN) Symposium for Nuclear Waste Isolation in Crystalline and Argillaceous Rocks was held July 16-20, 1978 in Berkeley. This report and recommendations are the proceedings from that symposium. The location, design, and testing of a potential nuclear waste disposal site are both a geologic and an engineering problem. Disposal requires isolating the wastes from the surface and subsurface of the earth for a period of time of ten to hundreds of thousands of years. Engineers have never before been called upon to predict the behavior of structures or the flow of groundwater so far into the future.
Date: December 19, 1978
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

Description: The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Group., Building Energy Analysis & Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department