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On the feasibility of using smoothed particle hydrodynamics for underwater explosion calculations

Description: SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine the feasibility of using PRONTO/SPH for the analysis of various types of underwater explosion problems involving fluid-structure and shock-structure interactions. Of particular interest are effects of bubble formation and collapse and the permanent deformation of thin walled structures due to these loadings. These are exceptionally difficult problems to model. Past attempts with various types of codes have not been satisfactory. Coupling SPH into the finite element code PRONTO represents a new approach to the problem. Results show that the method is well-suited for transmission of loads from underwater explosions to nearby structures, but the calculation of late time effects due to acceleration of gravity and bubble buoyancy will require additional development, and possibly coupling with implicit or incompressible methods.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Swegle, J.W. & Attaway, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part III. Finite Element Analysis in Nonlinear Solid Mechanics

Description: This report outlines the application of finite element methodology to large deformation solid mechanics problems, detailing also some of the key technological issues that effective finite element formulations must address. The presentation is organized into three major portions: first, a discussion of finite element discretization from the global point of view, emphasizing the relationship between a virtual work principle and the associated fully discrete system, second, a discussion of finite element technology, emphasizing the important theoretical and practical features associated with an individual finite element; and third, detailed description of specific elements that enjoy widespread use, providing some examples of the theoretical ideas already described. Descriptions of problem formulation in nonlinear solid mechanics, nonlinear continuum mechanics, and constitutive modeling are given in three companion reports.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Laursen, T.A.; Attaway, S.W. & Zadoks, R.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collaborating with human factors when designing an electronic textbook

Description: The development of on-line engineering textbooks presents new challenges to authors to effectively integrate text and tools in an electronic environment. By incorporating human factors principles of interface design and cognitive psychology early in the design process, a team at Sandia National Laboratories was able to make the end product more usable and shorten the prototyping and editing phases. A critical issue was simultaneous development of paper and on-line versions of the textbook. In addition, interface consistency presented difficulties with distinct goals and limitations for each media. Many of these problems were resolved swiftly with human factors input using templates, style guides and iterative usability testing of both paper and on-line versions. Writing style continuity was also problematic with numerous authors contributing to the text.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Ratner, J.A.; Zadoks, R.I. & Attaway, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimizing the Point-In-Box Search Algorithm for the Cray Y-MP(TM) Supercomputer

Description: Determining the subset of points (particles) in a problem domain that are contained within certain spatial regions of interest can be one of the most time-consuming parts of some computer simulations. Examples where this 'point-in-box' search can dominate the computation time include (1) finite element contact problems; (2) molecular dynamics simulations; and (3) interactions between particles in numerical methods, such as discrete particle methods or smooth particle hydrodynamics. This paper describes methods to optimize a point-in-box search algorithm developed by Swegle that make optimal use of the architectural features of the Cray Y-MP Supercomputer.
Date: December 23, 1998
Creator: Attaway, S.W.; Davis, M.E.; Heinstein, M.W. & Swegle, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transient dynamics simulations: Parallel algorithms for contact detection and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

Description: Transient dynamics simulations are commonly used to model phenomena such as car crashes, underwater explosions, and the response of shipping containers to high-speed impacts. Physical objects in such a simulation are typically represented by Lagrangian meshes because the meshes can move and deform with the objects as they undergo stress. Fluids (gasoline, water) or fluid-like materials (earth) in the simulation can be modeled using the techniques of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Implementing a hybrid mesh/particle model on a massively parallel computer poses several difficult challenges. One challenge is to simultaneously parallelize and load-balance both the mesh and particle portions of the computation. A second challenge is to efficiently detect the contacts that occur within the deforming mesh and between mesh elements and particles as the simulation proceeds. These contacts impart forces to the mesh elements and particles which must be computed at each timestep to accurately capture the physics of interest. In this paper we describe new parallel algorithms for smoothed particle hydrodynamics and contact detection which turn out to have several key features in common. Additionally, we describe how to join the new algorithms with traditional parallel finite element techniques to create an integrated particle/mesh transient dynamics simulation. Our approach to this problem differs from previous work in that we use three different parallel decompositions, a static one for the finite element analysis and dynamic ones for particles and for contact detection. We have implemented our ideas in a parallel version of the transient dynamics code PRONTO-3D and present results for the code running on a large Intel Paragon.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Hendrickson, B.; Plimpton, S.; Attaway, S. & Swegle, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parallel contact detection algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using PRONTO3D

Description: An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating material surface contacts in solid mechanics finite element programs has been implemented in a modular way for MIMD parallel computers. The serial contact detection algorithm that was developed previously for the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO3D has been extended for use in parallel computation by devising a dynamic (adaptive) processor load balancing scheme.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A. & Plimpton, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transient Solid Dynamics Simulations on the Sandia/Intel Teraflop Computer

Description: Transient solid dynamics simulations are among the most widely used engineering calculations. Industrial applications include vehicle crashworthiness studies, metal forging, and powder compaction prior to sintering. These calculations are also critical to defense applications including safety studies and weapons simulations. The practical importance of these calculations and their computational intensiveness make them natural candidates for parallelization. This has proved to be difficult, and existing implementations fail to scale to more than a few dozen processors. In this paper we describe our parallelization of PRONTO, Sandia`s transient solid dynamics code, via a novel algorithmic approach that utilizes multiple decompositions for different key segments of the computations, including the material contact calculation. This latter calculation is notoriously difficult to perform well in parallel, because it involves dynamically changing geometry, global searches for elements in contact, and unstructured communications among the compute nodes. Our approach scales to at least 3600 compute nodes of the Sandia/Intel Teraflop computer (the largest set of nodes to which we have had access to date) on problems involving millions of finite elements. On this machine we can simulate models using more than ten- million elements in a few tenths of a second per timestep, and solve problems more than 3000 times faster than a single processor Cray Jedi.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Attaway, S.; Brown, K.; Gardner, D.; Hendrickson, B. & Barragy, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parallel Strategies for Crash and Impact Simulations

Description: We describe a general strategy we have found effective for parallelizing solid mechanics simula- tions. Such simulations often have several computationally intensive parts, including finite element integration, detection of material contacts, and particle interaction if smoothed particle hydrody- namics is used to model highly deforming materials. The need to balance all of these computations simultaneously is a difficult challenge that has kept many commercial and government codes from being used effectively on parallel supercomputers with hundreds or thousands of processors. Our strategy is to load-balance each of the significant computations independently with whatever bal- ancing technique is most appropriate. The chief benefit is that each computation can be scalably paraIlelized. The drawback is the data exchange between processors and extra coding that must be written to maintain multiple decompositions in a single code. We discuss these trade-offs and give performance results showing this strategy has led to a parallel implementation of a widely-used solid mechanics code that can now be run efficiently on thousands of processors of the Pentium-based Sandia/Intel TFLOPS machine. We illustrate with several examples the kinds of high-resolution, million-element models that can now be simulated routinely. We also look to the future and dis- cuss what possibilities this new capabUity promises, as well as the new set of challenges it poses in material models, computational techniques, and computing infrastructure.
Date: December 7, 1998
Creator: Attaway, S.; Brown, K.; Hendrickson, B. & Plimpton, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel dispersal in high-speed aircraft/soil impact scenarios

Description: The objective of this study is to determine how the jet fuel contained in aircraft wing tanks disperses on impact with a soft terrain, i.e., soils, at high impact velocities. The approach used in this study is to combine experimental and numerical methods. Tests were conducted with an approximately 1/42 linear-scale mass-model of a 1/4 span section of a C-141 wing impacting a sand/clay mixture. The test results showed that within the uncertainty of the data, the percentage of incident liquid mass remaining in the crater is the same as that qualitatively described in earlier napalm bomb development studies. Namely, the percentage of fuel in the crater ranges from near zero for grazing impacts to 25%--50% for high angles of impact. To support a weapons system safety assessment (WSSA), the data from the current study have been reduced to correlations. The numerical model used in the current study is a unique coupling of a Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method with the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO. Qualitatively, the splash, erosion, and soil compression phenomena are all numerically predicted. Quantitatively, the numerical method predicted a smaller crater cross section than was observed in the tests.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Tieszen, S.R. & Attaway, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A new parallel algorithm for contact detection in finite element methods

Description: In finite-element, transient dynamics simulations, physical objects are typically modeled as Lagrangian meshes because the meshes can move and deform with the objects as they undergo stress. In many simulations, such as computations of impacts or explosions, portions of the deforming mesh come in contact with each other as the simulation progresses. These contacts must be detected and the forces they impart to the mesh must be computed at each timestep to accurately capture the physics of interest. While the finite-element portion of these computations is readily parallelized, the contact detection problem is difficult to implement efficiently on parallel computers and has been a bottleneck to achieving high performance on large parallel machines. In this paper we describe a new parallel algorithm for detecting contacts. Our approach differs from previous work in that we use two different parallel decompositions, a static one for the finite element analysis and dynamic one for contact detection. We present results for this algorithm in a parallel version of the transient dynamics code PRONTO-3D running on a large Intel Paragon.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Hendrickson, B.; Plimpton, S.; Attaway, S.; Vaughan, C. & Gardner, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part 1. Problem Formulation in Nonlinear Solid Mechancis

Description: This report gives an introduction to the basic concepts and principles involved in the formulation of nonlinear problems in solid mechanics. By way of motivation, the discussion begins with a survey of some of the important sources of nonlinearity in solid mechanics applications, using wherever possible simple one dimensional idealizations to demonstrate the physical concepts. This discussion is then generalized by presenting generic statements of initial/boundary value problems in solid mechanics, using linear elasticity as a template and encompassing such ideas as strong and weak forms of boundary value problems, boundary and initial conditions, and dynamic and quasistatic idealizations. The notational framework used for the linearized problem is then extended to account for finite deformation of possibly inelastic solids, providing the context for the descriptions of nonlinear continuum mechanics, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology given in three companion reports.
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A. & Zadoks, R.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

Description: This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A. & Zadoks, R.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupling of smooth particle hydrodynamics with PRONTO

Description: A gridless numerical technique called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been coupled to the transient dynamics finite element code, PRONTO. In this paper, a new weighted residual derivation for the SPH method will be presented, and the methods used to embed SPH within PRONTO will be outlined. Example SPH-PRONTO calculations will also be presented. One major difficulty associated with the Lagrangian finite element method is modeling materials with no shear strength; for example, gases, fluids and explosive bi-products. Typically these materials can be modeled for only a short time with a Lagrangian finite element code. Large distortions cause tangling of the mesh, which will eventually lead to numerical difficulties such as negative element area or ``bow tie`` elements. Remeshing will allow the problem to continue for a short while, but the large distortions can prevent a complete analysis. Smooth particle hydrodynamics is a gridless Lagrangian technique. Requiring no mesh, SPH has the potential to model material fracture, large shear flows, and penetration. SPH computes the strain rate and the stress divergence based on the nearest neighbors of a particle, which are determined using an efficient particle sorting technique. Embedding the SPH method within PRONTO allows part of the problem to be modeled with quadrilateral finite elements while other parts are modeled with the gridless SPH method. SPH elements are coupled to the quadrilateral elements through a contact like algorithm.
Date: August 1, 1993
Creator: Attaway, S. W.; Heinstein, M. W.; Mello, F. J. & Swegle, J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A general-purpose contact detection algorithm for nonlinear structural analysis codes

Description: A new contact detection algorithm has been developed to address difficulties associated with the numerical simulation of contact in nonlinear finite element structural analysis codes. Problems including accurate and efficient detection of contact for self-contacting surfaces, tearing and eroding surfaces, and multi-body impact are addressed. The proposed algorithm is portable between dynamic and quasi-static codes and can efficiently model contact between a variety of finite element types including shells, bricks, beams and particles. The algorithm is composed of (1) a location strategy that uses a global search to decide which slave nodes are in proximity to a master surface and (2) an accurate detailed contact check that uses the projected motions of both master surface and slave node. In this report, currently used contact detection algorithms and their associated difficulties are discussed. Then the proposed algorithm and how it addresses these problems is described. Finally, the capability of the new algorithm is illustrated with several example problems.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Heinstein, M. W.; Attaway, S. W.; Swegle, J. W. & Mello, F. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupled explosive/structure computational techniques at Sandia National Laboratories

Description: Simulation of the effects of explosives on structures is a challenge because the explosive response can best be simulated using Eulerian computational techniques and structural behavior is best modeled using Lagrangian methods. Due to the different methodology of the two computational techniques and code architecture requirements, they are usually implemented in different computer programs. Explosive and structure modeling in two different codes make it difficult or next to impossible to do coupled explosive/structure interaction simulations. Sandia National Laboratories has developed two techniques for solving this problem. The first is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a relatively new gridless method comparable to Eulerian, that is especially suited for treating liquids and gases such as those produced by an explosive. The SPH capability has been fully implemented into the transient dynamics finite element (Lagrangian) codes PRONTO-2D and -3D. A PRONTO-3D/SPH simulation of the effect of a blast on a protective-wall barrier is presented in this paper. The second technique employed at Sandia uses a new code called Zapotec that combines the 3-D Eulerian code CTH and the Lagrangian code PRONTO-3D with minimal changes to either code. CTH and PRONTO-3D are currently executing on the Sandia Terraflops machine (9000 Pentium Pro processors). Eulerian simulations with 100 million cells have been completed on the current configuration of the machine (4500 Pentium Pro processors). The CTH and PRONTO-3D combination will soon be executing in a coupled fashion on this machine.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Preece, D.S.; Attaway, S.W. & Swegle, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A parallel algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations with contact detection

Description: Solid dynamics simulations with Lagrangian finite elements are used to model a wide variety of problems, such as the calculation of impact damage to shipping containers for nuclear waste and the analysis of vehicular crashes. Using parallel computers for these simulations has been hindered by the difficulty of searching efficiently for material surface contacts in parallel. A new parallel algorithm for calculation of arbitrary material contacts in finite element simulations has been developed and implemented in the PRONTO3D transient solid dynamics code. This paper will explore some of the issues involved in developing efficient, portable, parallel finite element models for nonlinear transient solid dynamics simulations. The contact-detection problem poses interesting challenges for efficient implementation of a solid dynamics simulation on a parallel computer. The finite element mesh is typically partitioned so that each processor owns a localized region of the finite element mesh. This mesh partitioning is optimal for the finite element portion of the calculation since each processor must communicate only with the few connected neighboring processors that share boundaries with the decomposed mesh. However, contacts can occur between surfaces that may be owned by any two arbitrary processors. Hence, a global search across all processors is required at every time step to search for these contacts. Load-imbalance can become a problem since the finite element decomposition divides the volumetric mesh evenly across processors but typically leaves the surface elements unevenly distributed. In practice, these complications have been limiting factors in the performance and scalability of transient solid dynamics on massively parallel computers. In this paper the authors present a new parallel algorithm for contact detection that overcomes many of these limitations.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Attaway, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Plimpton, S.; Gardner, D.; Vaughan, C.; Heinstein, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

Description: SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Swegle, J. W.; Attaway, S. W.; Heinstein, M. W.; Mello, F. J. & Hicks, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PRONTO3D users` instructions: A transient dynamic code for nonlinear structural analysis

Description: This report provides an updated set of users` instructions for PRONTO3D. PRONTO3D is a three-dimensional, transient, solid dynamics code for analyzing large deformations of highly nonlinear materials subjected to extremely high strain rates. This Lagrangian finite element program uses an explicit time integration operator to integrate the equations of motion. Eight-node, uniform strain, hexahedral elements and four-node, quadrilateral, uniform strain shells are used in the finite element formulation. An adaptive time step control algorithm is used to improve stability and performance in plasticity problems. Hourglass distortions can be eliminated without disturbing the finite element solution using either the Flanagan-Belytschko hourglass control scheme or an assumed strain hourglass control scheme. All constitutive models in PRONTO3D are cast in an unrotated configuration defined using the rotation determined from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. A robust contact algorithm allows for the impact and interaction of deforming contact surfaces of quite general geometry. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method has been embedded into PRONTO3D using the contact algorithm to couple it with the finite element method.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Attaway, S.W.; Mello, F.J.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Ratner, J.A. & Zadoks, R.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parallel algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using finite elements and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

Description: An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating contacts in solid mechanics has been applied to interactions between particles in smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The algorithm uses three different decompositions within a single timestep: (1) a static FE-decomposition of mesh elements; (2) a dynamic SPH-decomposition of SPH particles; (3) and a dynamic contact-decomposition of contact nodes and SPH particles. The overhead cost of such a scheme is the cost of moving mesh and particle data between the decompositions. This cost turns out to be small in practice, leading to a highly load-balanced decomposition in which to perform each of the three major computational states within a timestep.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.; Swegle, J.W.; Gardner, D.R. & Vaughan, C.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of impact limiter performance during end-on and slapdown drop tests of a one-third scale model storage/transport cask system

Description: This report describes drop testing of a one-third scale model shipping cask system. Two casks were designed and fabricated by Transnuclear, Inc., to ship spent fuel from the former Nuclear Fuel Services West Valley reprocessing facility in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for a long-term spent fuel dry storage demonstration project. As part of the NRC's regulatory certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data on impact limiter performance during impact testing. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. Two 30-ft (9-m) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood-filled impact limiters. This report describes the results of both tests in terms of measured decelerations, posttest deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system. 3 refs., 32 figs.
Date: December 1, 1990
Creator: Yoshimura, H.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department