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Study of the hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

Description: The reaction of uranium hexafluoride with water has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Several different methods for accomplishing this task have been carried out. In addition, interpretatins of the results have been made. These interpretations have been based on literature values for the reactants and for compounds analogous to possible products. It was shown that classical matrix-isolation techniques proved to be unsatisfactory for studying this reaction. Other methods were developed in order to obtain results. They were: (1) the codeposition of pure UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O on a cold window at 16/sup 0/K, (2) the codeposition of argon matrix to sample ratios of 10:1 to 2:1 of UF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/O at 16/sup 0/K, and (3) the annealing of the samples produced by (1) and (2) while they were being scanned with FT-IR. 78 refs., 86 figs., 7 tabs.
Date: August 1, 1982
Creator: Anderson, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of vibrational excitation on the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions

Description: A new experimental technique for the study of vibrational effects on ion-molecule reaction cross sections is described. Vibrational and collision energy dependent cross sections are presented for proton and H atom transfer, charge transfer and collision induced dissociation reactions in various isotopic H/sub 2//sup +/ + H/sub 2/ systems. Charge and proton transfer cross sections are presented for the reactions of H/sub 2//sup +/ and D/sub 2//sup +/ with Ar, N/sub 2/, CO, and O/sub 2/. All the reactions are shown to be highly influenced by avoided crossings between the ground and first excited potential energy surfaces. Because of the nature of the crossings, vibrational motion of the systems can cause both adiabatic and non-adiabatic behavior of the system. This makes the vibrational dependences of the various cross sections a very sensitive probe of the dynamics of the collisions particularly, their behavior in the region of the crossings. Evidence is seen for charge transfer between reagents as they approach each other, transition to and in some cases reactions on excited potential energy surfaces, competition between different channels, and strong coupling of proton and charge transfer channels which occurs only for two of the systems studied (H/sub 2//sup +/ + Ar, N/sub 2/). Oscillatory structure is observed in the collision energy dependence of the endoergic H/sub 2//sup +/ (v = 0) + Ar charge transfer reaction for the first time, and a simple model which is commonly used for atom-atom charge transfer is used to fit the peaks. Finally a simple model is used to assess the importance of energy resonance and Franck-Condon effects on molecular charge transfer.
Date: November 1, 1981
Creator: Anderson, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability Constants and Intrinsic Solubility of Several Nickel(II)-vic- Dioxime Complexes

Description: An investigation was made to determine the stability constants for several Ni(II) vic-dioximes and to calculate their intrinsic solubility constants. Data and discussion concerning dimethylglyoxime, diethylgiyoxime. di- npropylglyoxime, ethylmethylglyoxime, 4-isoproplynioxime, nioxime, 4- methylnioxime, 3-methylnioxime, heptoxime, and Ni(II) complexes of these vic- dioximes are presented. (J.R.D.)
Date: March 1, 1962
Creator: Banks, C. V. & Anderson, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VIBRATIONAL ANALYSIS OF UNFIRED HORIZONTAL BAYONET TUBES IN A FLUIDIZED BED CALCINER

Description: The heat exchanger of the calciner consists of a vessel into which unfired, horizontal, bayonet tubes extend in a fluidized bed. Strain measurements were taken on several of the tubes under simulated operating conditions and the associated dynamic stresses were calculated. Vibrations greater than design limitations for indefinite operation were found to exist. To restrict these vibrations and prevent further tube fatigue cracking, a tube support was installed. Since the installation of the support, the calciner has operated satisfactorily over 1275 hours. (auth)
Date: October 19, 1962
Creator: Anderson, S.D. & Hirschi, G.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Taxonomic and developmental aspects of radiosensitivity

Description: Considerable information is available on the effects of radioactivity on adult and early life stages of organisms. The preponderance of data is on mortality after a single irradiation with relatively high doses. Unfortunately, because experiments were carried out under different conditions and for different time periods, the validity of comparing the results from different laxonomic groups is questionable. In general, the conclusions are that there is a relationship (1) between radioresistance to high doses of acute radiation and taxonomy of the organism, primitive forms being more radioresistant than complex vertebrates and (2) between radiosensitivity and developmental stage, early life stages being more sensitive than later stages. The first conclusion may be related to the capability of the organism to repopulate cells and to differentiate and redifferentiate them; the second to the rate of cellular division and to the degree of differentiation. In question, however, is the relevance of the responses from high levels of acute radiation to that of the responses to long-term exposure to low levels of radiation, which are ecologically of more interest. Data from studies of the effects of acute and chronic exposure on development of gametes and zygotes indicate that, for some fishes and invertebrates, responses at the cellular and molecular levels show effect levels comparable to those observed in some mammals. Acute doses between 0,05 and 0.5Cy and dose rates between 0.02 to 0.2mCy/h appear to define critical ranges in which detrimental effects on fertility are first observed in a variety of radiosensitive organisms. To better understand inherent radiosensitivity, we need more information on the ability of cells to repopulate and differentiate and to prevent or repair damage to biological critical molecules, such as DNA, because these factors may alter significantly organisms` responses to radiation.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Harrison, F.L. & Anderson, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permanent Magnet Skew Quadrupoles for the Low Emittance LER Lattice of PEP-II

Description: The vertical emittance of the low energy ring (LER) in the PEP-II B-Factory was reduced by using skew quadrupoles consisting of permanent magnet material. The advantages over electric quadrupoles or rotating existing normal quadrupoles are discussed. To assure a high field quality, a Biot-Savart calculation was used to cancel the natural 12-pole component by using different size poles over a few layers. A magnetic measurement confirmed the high quality of the magnets. After installation and adjusting the original electric 12 skew and 16 normal quadrupoles the emittance contribution from the region close to the interaction point, which was the biggest part in the original design, was considerably reduced. To strengthen the vertical behavior of the LER beam, a low emittance lattice was developed. It lowered the original vertical design emittance from 0.54 nm-rad to 0.034 nm-rad. In order to achieve this, additional skew quadrupoles were required to bring the coupling correction out of the arcs and closer to the detector solenoid in the straight (Fig. 1). It is important, together with low vertical dispersion, that the low vertical emittance is not coupled into the horizontal, which is what we get if the coupling correction continues into the arcs. Further details of the lattice work is described in another paper; here we concentrate on the development of the permanent skew (PSK) quadrupole solution. Besides the permanent magnets there are two other possibilities, using electric magnets or rotating normal quadrupoles. Electric magnets would have required much more additional equipment like magnets stands, power supply, and new vacuum chamber sections. Rotating existing quadrupoles was also not feasible since they are mostly mounted together with a bending magnet on the same support girder.
Date: July 5, 2011
Creator: Decker, F.-J.; Anderson, S.; Kharakh, D.; Sullivan, M. & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

Description: This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.
Date: May 1, 2007
Creator: Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P. & Anderson, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

Description: The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.
Date: February 1, 1999
Creator: Anderson, S. R.; Kuntz, M. A. & Davis, L. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A program to study CH reactions relevant to combustion/gasification processes

Description: The goal of the proposed work has been to study a small, but important family of CH reactions of interest in combustion-related systems; namely CH + N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O. Until now, these reactions have been studied almost exclusively by IR or UV flash photolysis at moderate temperatures, and little quantitative information about product species has been obtained. The explicit objectives of the present effort were: (1) to develop and characterize a new CW source of CH radicals suitable for use in a fast-flow reactor, (2) to use this source to measure rate constants for several key CH reactions as a function of temperature, and (3) to detect the product channels of these reactions wherever possible. Our accomplishments include: the successful development of a chemical source of CH radicals; the measurement of eight rate constants at 300 K (which agree with previously reported values where available); the detection of OH produced by the CH + NO and O{sub 2} reactions; the completion of a thorough study of isotopic exchange in the products of the reaction CH + CO; and, finally, the taking of the first steps to extending this work to higher temperatures.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Anderson, S.M.; Freedman, A. & Kolb, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1995--December 1995

Description: The primary objective of this work is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to characterize the microporous structure of coals. As an aide in this characterization, which is by no means straightforward, another objective is to combine this technique with volumetric adsorption techniques and track the effect of controlled opening of the micropores in a microporous carbon by oxygen chemisorption/desorption. The primary goal of the NMR work is to measure the micropore sizes in coal; more broadly, it is to better tailor the {sup 129}Xe NMR method for use with coal, and to investigate other ways it may be used to describe pore structure in coal, with emphasis on determining whether micropores in coal are connected or isolated. In terms of the primary objectives of the project, the {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra with pressure variation have been obtained for two more coals, completing this task for the sample set of six coals. In terms of the broad objectives of the project, examination of the influence on the xenon signal of packing the powdered coal has been undertaken. These data are of potential value for the determination of whether the porosity is open or closed. Results of powder density and related experiments will be used in the final interpretation of our current data, including the determination of whether, in the NMR of loose powdered, the chemical shift is indicative of the ``true`` gas-solid interaction.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R. & Hatcher, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First operation of the upgraded SLAC A-Line

Description: The SLAC A-Line has been upgraded to transport electrons to fixed target experiments in End Station A (ESA) with energies up to 50 GeV. From September through November, 1995, this beam line was commissioned and used to deliver 48.36 GeV polarized electrons to Experiment E-154 at 120 pulses/sec and up to 10{sup 11} e{sup {minus}}/pulse. The beam had a full width momentum spread of less than 0.5 percent, and was focused to a small spot ({sigma}=0.7 mm) at the target. In this paper the authors describe the first operational experience with this new beam line.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Erickson, R.; Anderson, S. & Baker, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1996--December 1996

Description: Selective presaturation and saturation transfer {sup 129}Xe NMR experiments were performed on a high volatile C bituminous coal and an anthracite. The experiments detect the movement of xenon atoms among different regions of the internal surface, and to the external surface of the coal particles. The results indicate that adsorbed xenon atoms can move to the external surface of the bituminous coal significantly faster than in the anthracite. The results are interpreted in terms of the porous structure of the coals.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Anderson, S.A.; Hatcher, P.G. & Radovic, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 1996

Description: Objective is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to study the microporous structure of coals. During this quarter, we have: performed a presaturation experiment on Wyodak subbituminous coal, monitored the progress of Xe adsorption in an anthracite, focusing on the changes observed in the external-surface adsorbed gas signal, used an echo sequence to obtain {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra of Blind Canyon hvAb coal, and improved and repeated the successive oxygen adsorption and desorption experiment on a microporous carbon.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R. & Hatcher, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

Description: The unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are made up of at least 178 basalt-flow groups, 103 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 4 rhyolite domes. Stratigraphic units identified in 333 wells in this 890-mile{sup 2} area include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. Stratigraphic units were identified and correlated using the data from numerous outcrops and 26 continuous cores and 328 natural-gamma logs available in December 1993. Basalt flows make up about 85% of the volume of deposits underlying the area.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Anderson, S.R. & Liszewski, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1996--September 1996

Description: The primary objective of this project is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to characterize the microporous structure of coals. We will use direct information on pore size, as well as indirect information from adsorption rates and evidence for intra/extraparticle diffusion, to characterize the connectivity of the micropore network. A second objective is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to describe the effect of controlled opening of the micropores in a microporous carbon by oxygen chemi-sorption/desorption. Our experimental focus in this quarter has been the low power presaturation of the NMR signal of {sup 129}Xe adsorbed in coal. Preliminary work on this experiment was reported in the last quarter. Low power presaturation of {sup 129}Xe adsorbed in two coals produces a hole-burning effect in the adsorbed xenon NMR signals, indicating that these signals are broad due to overlap of a series of chemical shifts. Saturation transfer to the entire adsorbed xenon signal and to the extraparticle gas is observed with increasing presaturation time. Differences in timing of saturation transfer to the external gas have implications for the nature of the connectivity of the pore structures in coal.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, S.A.; Hatcher, P.G. & Radovic, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1996--March 1996

Description: The primary objective of this work is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to characterize the microporous structure of coals. Another objective is to use this technique to describe the effect of controlled opening of the micropores in a microporous carbon by oxygen chemisorption/desorption. The primary goal of the NMR work is to measure the micropore sizes in coal; more broadly, it is to better tailor the {sup 129}Xe NMR method for use with coal, and to investigate other ways it may be used to describe pore structure in coal, with emphasis on determining whether micropores in coal are connected or isolated. During this quarter, we have: (i) investigated particle size effect on the chemical shift of xenon adsorbed in a set of size-graded vitrinites; (ii) tracked the progress of xenon adsorption via xenon NMR, including particle size effect on the adsorption process; (iii) completed a preliminary test for chemical shift anisotropy in coal; and (iv) examined a microporous carbon by {sup 129}Xe NMR after two cycles of oxygen chemisorption/desorption.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R. & Hatcher, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Technical progress report, September 1994--October 1995

Description: The primary objective of this work is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to characterize the microporous structure of coals. As an aide in this characterization, another objective is to combine this technique with volumetric adsorption techniques and track the effect of controlled opening of the micropores in a microporous carbon by oxygen chemisorption/desorption. The primary goal of the NMR work is to measure the micropore sizes in coal; more broadly, it is to better tailor the {sup 129}Xe NMR method for use with coal, and to investigate other ways it may be used to describe pore structure in coal, with emphasis on determining whether micropores in coal are connected or isolated. In terms of the primary objectives of the project, the {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra with pressure variation have been completed for four coals, and N{sub 2} and C0{sub 2} adsorption isotherms with surface area measurement have been completed for three coals. A microporous carbon has been subjected to one oxygen chemisorption/desorption cycle and examined by {sup 129}Xe NMR.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R. & Hatcher, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials

Description: Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and {gamma}'s over the life of the facility [1]. While the linacs will be superconducting, there are still many uses for NdFeB in the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus. Our understanding of the situation for rare earth, permanent magnet materials was presented at PAC03 [2]. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented at EPAC04 [3]. We have extended the doses, included other manufacturer's samples, and measured induced radioactivities which are discussed in detail.
Date: May 17, 2005
Creator: Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; /SLAC; Baldwin, A.; Pellett, D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report

Description: The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.
Date: June 1, 1981
Creator: Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R. & Anderson, S.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stratigraphic data for wells at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

Description: A stratigraphic data base containing 230 stratigraphic units in 333 wells was constructed for deposits that make up the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near INEL in eastern Idaho. Stratigraphic units, which were identified and correlated using data from numerous outcrops, 26 continuous cores, and 328 natural-gamma logs available in Dec. 1993, include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. By volume, basalt flows make up about 90% of the deposits underlying most of this 890 mi{sup 2} area. Basalt, sediment, andesite, and rhyolite were identified from outcrops and cores that were selectively evaluated. Stratigraphic units were correlated using these data and natural-gamma logs. Best correlations were for basalt and sediment at Test Area North, the Naval Reactors Area, the Test Reactor Area, ICPP, and the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), where most cores and 2/3 of the logs were obtained. Correlations range from good at the RWMC to uncertain the eastern half of the study area. A computer diskette containing the data is included.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Anderson, S. R.; Ackerman, D. J.; Liszewski, M. J. & Frieburger, R. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiber optic sensor: Feedback control design and implementation

Description: Digital feedback control of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) has been demonstrated on a tube sample of stainless steel and titanium alloy. A fiber optic sensor returns a signal proportional to backside radiance from the workpiece; that signal is used by the controller to compute a compensation weld current. The controller executes 10 times a second on an Intel 486 chip. For travel speeds of 3 to 6 inches per minute and thicknesses between 0.025 and 0.10 inches, constant backside bead width was maintained within 0.02 inches, from startup to tie-in.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Tung, D.; Bertram, L.; Hillaire, R.; Anderson, S.; Leonard, S. & Marburger, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department