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METAL FILTERS FOR PRESSURIZED FLUID BED COMBUSTION (PFBC) APPLICATIONS

Description: Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. As part of the demonstration effort, SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field-tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous commercial metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions.
Date: January 2, 2004
Creator: Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--

Description: Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.
Date: April 23, 2004
Creator: Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED SECOND GENERATION CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

Description: Through sponsorship from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), development and manufacture of advanced second generation candle filters was undertaken in the early 1990's. Efforts were primarily focused on the manufacture of fracture toughened, 1.5 m, continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) and filament wound candle filters by 3M, McDermott, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Techniweave. In order to demonstrate long-term thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of the advanced second generation candle filter materials, Siemens Westinghouse initiated high temperature, bench-scale, corrosion testing of 3M's CVI-SiC and DuPont's PRD-66 mini-candles, and DuPont's CFCC SiC-SiC and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} coupons under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions. This effort was followed by an evaluation of the mechanical and filtration performance of the advanced second generation filter elements in Siemens Westinghouse's bench-scale PFBC test facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Arrays of 1.4-1.5 m 3M CVI-SiC, DuPont PRD-66, DuPont SiC-SiC, and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} candles were subjected to steady state process operating conditions, increased severity thermal transients, and accelerated pulse cycling test campaigns which represented {approx}1760 hours of equivalent filter operating life. Siemens Westinghouse subsequently participated in early material surveillance programs which marked entry of the 3M CVI-SiC and DuPont PRD-66 candle filters in Siemens Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (APF) system at the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio. Siemens Westinghouse then conducted an extended, accelerated life, qualification program, evaluating the performance of the 3M, McDermott, and Techniweave oxide-based CFCC filter elements, modified DuPont PRD-66 elements, and the Blasch, Scapa Cerafil{sup TM}, and Specific Surface monolithic candles for use in the APF system at the Foster Wheeler pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC), pilot-scale, test facility in Karhula, Finland. This report presents a summary of these efforts, defining the stability of the various porous ceramic filter materials, as well as component ...
Date: January 31, 2002
Creator: Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials. Topical report, September 1995

Description: Advancements have been made during the past five years to not only increase the strength of the as-manufactured clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials, but also to improve their high temperature creep resistance properties. This report reviews these developments, and describes the results of preliminary qualification testing which has been conducted at Westinghouse prior to utilizing the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide filters in high temperature, pressurized, coal-fired combustion and/or gasification applications.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ASSESSMENT OF THE PCFBC-EXPOSED AND ACCELERATED LIFE-TESTED CANDLE FILTERS

Description: Development of the hot gas filtration technology has been the focus of DOE/FETC and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation during the past twenty years. Systems development during this time has successfully lead to the generation and implementation of high temperature Siemens Westinghouse particulate filtration systems that are currently installed and are operational at Demonstration Plant sites, and which are ready for installation at commercial plant sites. Concurrently, materials development has advanced the use of commercially available oxide- and nonoxide-based monoliths, and has fostered the manufacture and use of second generation, oxide-based, continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites and filament wound materials. This report summarizes the material characterization results for commercially available and second generation filter materials tested in Siemens Westinghouse's advanced, high temperature, particulate removal system at the Foster Wheeler, pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion, pilot-scale test facility in Karhula, Finland, and subsequent extended accelerated life testing of aged elements in Siemens Westinghouse pressurized fluidized-bed combustion simulator test facility in Pittsburgh, PA. The viability of operating candle filters successfully for over 1 year of service life has been shown in these efforts. Continued testing to demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring three years of service operation on aged filter elements is recommended.
Date: September 30, 1999
Creator: Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of Metal Media Filters for Advanced Coal-Based Power Generation Applications

Description: Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. This paper reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion conditions.
Date: September 19, 2002
Creator: Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simultaneous high-temperature removal of alkali and particulates in a pressurized gasification system. Final technical progress report, April 1981-July 1983

Description: This program is directed at performing experimental and analytical investigations, deriving system designs, and estimating costs to ascertain the feasibility of using aluminosilicate-based getters for controlling alkali in pressurized gasification systems. Its overall objective is to develop a plan for evaluating a scaled-up version of the gettering process as a unit operation or as an integral part of a particulate removal device. This report describes work completed on the four technical program tasks: Thermodynamic projections; Getter Selection and Qualification; System Performance Projections; and Program Definition for Concept Scale-up during the 27-month contract performance period. Work completed on the thermodynamic projections includes a data base update, development of alkali phase diagrams, and system performance projections. Getter selection and qualification efforts involved over 70 kinetic studies in which a leading candidate getter - emathlite - was selected and characterized. System performance projections identified a packed-bed configuration containing relatively large getter pellets as the preferred contacting device for a full-scale unit. For emathlite, we concluded that full-scale unit bed heights of 2 m or less would be required if we assume annual replacement on the basis of bed saturation capacity. Concept scale-up work involved defining the hardware and test program requirements for further development of the emathlite packed-bed system. 56 references, 80 figures, 74 tables.
Date: September 1, 1983
Creator: Mulik, P.R.; Alvin, M.A. & Bachovchin, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simultaneous high-temperature removal of alkali and particulates in a pressurized gasification system. Fifth quarterly project report, April 1982-June 1982. [Concentration of Na and K in gas at process conditions; also optimization of removal system]

Description: This program is directed at performing experimental and analytical investigations, deriving system designs, and estimating costs to ascertain the feasibility of using aluminosilicate-based getters for controlling alkali in pressurized gasification systems. Its overall objective is to develop a comprehensive plan for evaluating a scaled-up version of the gettering process as a unit operation or as an integral part of a particulate removal device. This report briefly summarizes efforts previously completed on thermodynamic projections and system performance projections, together with current work on getter selection and qualification completed during the fifth quarter of the project. Work on the thermodynamic projections has been completed and includes an update of the data base, development of alkali phase diagrams, and projections for several gasification processes. Getter selection and qualification efforts involved four tests - two with activated bauxite and one each with diatomaceous earth and Novacite on the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) system. Finally, system performance projections entailed examination of available kinetic data to ascertain the rate-controlling step, along with modeling efforts to determine the size requirements of a commercial-sized unit.
Date: July 1, 1982
Creator: Mulik, P.R.; Alvin, M.A. & Bachovchin, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials

Description: This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.
Date: November 1, 1989
Creator: Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E. & Lippert, T.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OPTIMIZATION OF ADVANCED FILTER SYSTEMS

Description: Reliable, maintainable and cost effective hot gas particulate filter technology is critical to the successful commercialization of advanced, coal-fired power generation technologies, such as IGCC and PFBC. In pilot plant testing, the operating reliability of hot gas particulate filters have been periodically compromised by process issues, such as process upsets and difficult ash cake behavior (ash bridging and sintering), and by design issues, such as cantilevered filter elements damaged by ash bridging, or excessively close packing of filtering surfaces resulting in unacceptable pressure drop or filtering surface plugging. This test experience has focused the issues and has helped to define advanced hot gas filter design concepts that offer higher reliability. Westinghouse has identified two advanced ceramic barrier filter concepts that are configured to minimize the possibility of ash bridge formation and to be robust against ash bridges should they occur. The ''inverted candle filter system'' uses arrays of thin-walled, ceramic candle-type filter elements with inside-surface filtering, and contains the filter elements in metal enclosures for complete separation from ash bridges. The ''sheet filter system'' uses ceramic, flat plate filter elements supported from vertical pipe-header arrays that provide geometry that avoids the buildup of ash bridges and allows free fall of the back-pulse released filter cake. The Optimization of Advanced Filter Systems program is being conducted to evaluate these two advanced designs and to ultimately demonstrate one of the concepts in pilot scale. In the Base Contract program, the subject of this report, Westinghouse has developed conceptual designs of the two advanced ceramic barrier filter systems to assess their performance, availability and cost potential, and to identify technical issues that may hinder the commercialization of the technologies. A plan for the Option I, bench-scale test program has also been developed based on the issues identified. The two advanced barrier filter systems ...
Date: April 30, 1998
Creator: Newby, R.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Alvin, M.A. & Lippert, T.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-eighth quarterly report, July--September 1994

Description: The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A. & Bachovchin, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and characterization of Textron continuous fiber ceramic composite hot gas filter materials. Final report, September 30, 1994--October 31, 1997

Description: Uncertainties about the long-term ability of monolithic ceramics to survive in the IGCC or PFBC hot gas filter environment led DOE/METC to consider the merits of using continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCCs) as potential next-generation high temperature filter elements. This seems to be a logical strategy to pursue in light of the fact that properly-engineered CFCC materials have shown much-improved damage tolerance and thermal shock behavior as compared to existing monolithic ceramic materials. Textron`s Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development Program was intended to be a two year, two phase program which transitioned developmental materials R and D into prototype filter element fabrication. The first phase was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of fabricating CFCC hot gas filter elements which could meet the pressure drop specifications of less than ten inches of water (iwg) at a face velocity of ten feet per minute (fpm), while showing sufficient integrity to survive normal mechanical loads and adequate environmental resistance to steam/alkali corrosion conditions at a temperature of approximately 870 C (1600 F). The primary objective of the second phase of the program was to scale up fabrication methods developed in Phase 1 to produce full-scale CFCC candle filters for validation testing. Textron encountered significant process-related and technical difficulties in merely meeting the program permeability specifications, and much effort was expended in showing that this could indeed be achieved. Thus, by the time the Phase 1 program was completed, expenditure of program funds precluded continuing on with Phase 2, and Textron elected to terminate their program after Phase 1. This allowed Textron to be able to focus technical and commercialization efforts on their largely successful DOE CFCC Program.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: DiPietro, S.G. & Alvin, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation

Description: The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A. & Bachovchin, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-ninth quarterly status report, October--December 1994

Description: The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A. & Bachovchin, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Filter cake characterization studies

Description: The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to provide gas turbine protection. The ILEC system is a ceramic barrier hot gas filter (HGF) that removes particulate while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur, alkali, and potentially other contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure fuel gases, or combustion gases. The gas-phase contaminant removal is performed by sorbent particles injected into the HGF. The overall objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the technical feasibility of the ILEC concept for multi-contaminant control, and to provide test data applicable to the design of subsequent field tests. The program has conducted ceramic barrier filter testing under simulated PFBC conditions to resolve issues relating to filter cake permeability, pulse cleaning, and filter cake additive performance. ILEC testing has also been performed to assess the potential for in-filter sulfur and alkali removal.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Newby, R.A.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A. & Lippert, T.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Filter component assessment

Description: The objectives of this program are to provide a more ruggedized filter system that utilizes porous ceramic filters which have improved resistance to damage resulting from crack propagation, thermal fatigue and/or thermal excursions during plant or process transient conditions, and/or mechanical ash bridging events within the candle filter array. As part of the current Phase 1, Task 1, effort of this program, Westinghouse is evaluating the filtration characteristics, mechanical integrity, and corrosion resistance of the following advanced or second generation candle filters for use in advanced coal-fired process applications: 3M CVI-SiC composite--chemical vapor infiltration of silicon carbide into an aluminosilicate Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber preform; DuPont PRD-66--filament wound candle filter structure containing corundum, cordierite, cristobalite, and mullite; DuPont SiC-SiC--chemical infiltration of silicon carbide into a silicon carbide Nicalon{trademark} fiber mat or felt preform; and IF and P Fibrosic{trademark}--vacuum infiltrated oxide-based chopped fibrous matrix. Results to date are presented.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S. & Smeltzer, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanical analysis of a cross flow filter

Description: Material properties have also been generated at the Argonne National Laboratories which detail the fracture toughness, Weibull modulus, and critical flaw size for a specifically fabricated lot of P-100A alumina/mullite cross flow filters.(Singh, 1990) The critical flaw size within the P-100A matrix was estimated to be [approximately]500 [mu],m which includes both large interconnected pores, as well as potentially debonded areas along the mid-rib or gas channel seams. Critical flaws are generally considered as potential failure initiation sites within the ceramic matrix. In addition maximum filter element stress levels induced by the process system have been estimated at ANL through the use of finite element computer analyses. These efforts project that the highest stresses result within the flange region of the cross flow filter. As a result of these projections, efforts at Coors Ceramics were directed to improving the overall strength of the alumina/mullite material which is used for cross flow filter fabrication. The results of the efforts at Coors Ceramics provide a significant improvement in the hot strength of the P-100A alumina/mullite filter matrix. Westinghouse assessed the existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques in terms of identifying methods for detecting critical flaws within the cross flow filter body. To date viable, cost effective methods for detecting critical flaws within the P-100A alumina/mullite matrix, or along the mid-rib bonds or gas channel seams in the full-scale, porous ceramic cross flow filter element are not readily available. As an alternate approach, Westinghouse focused its attention on developing NDE techniques as inspection methods for evaluating the extent of bonding along the mid-rib bonds and gas channel seams which results during the various fabrication stages of the cross flow filter element.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Attaar, M.H. & McNerney, K.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes]

Description: This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A. & Patel, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hot gas cleanup using ceramic cross flow membrane filters. Final report

Description: The single unresolved technical issue in the commercialization of pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PPBC) for electric power production is the hot gas cleaning problem. In this technology, high-temperature and -pressure (HTHP), dust-laden flue gases from the combustor must be cleaned enough to reduce expansion turbine blade erosion to an economically acceptable level. Additionally, the level of particulate emission must be compatible with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for environmental acceptability. The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a wide range of research and development programs directed at the solution of this problem. These programs were divided into two classifications, one dealing with more advanced concepts where testing was to be done at relatively large scale and a second group of less advanced, novel concepts where the testing was to be carried out at a bench scale. The cross-flow ceramic membrane filter program described in this report is a member of the small-scale, novel concept group.
Date: December 1, 1983
Creator: Ciliberti, D.F.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Keairns, D.L. & Bachovchin, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Filter Component Assessment

Description: Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S. & Smeltzer, E.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Candle Filter Failure Safeguard Device

Description: The objective of the program was to develop an SGD which would essentially eliminate ash or char leakage. The quantitative target was arrived at based on detailed estimates of gas turbine and combustor performance degradation due to particle erosion and deposition. An SGD capable of limiting particle leakage to <0.5 ppmw will be needed to achieve highest system availability, commensurate with annual maintenance outage. Our advanced SGD concepts were selected to achieve the goal of >16,000 hours cleaning interval.
Date: September 18, 2002
Creator: Sanjana, Z.; Bruck, G.; Smeltzer, E.; Alvin, M.A.; Newby, R. & Foote, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department