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Reactive sintering of TiAl–Ti5Si3 in situ composites

Description: TiAl with between 0 and 20 vol%Ti5Si3 was produced by reactive sintering (700 °C for 15 min in vacuum) of cold pressed compacts of elemental Ti, Al and Si powder. The results show that adding Si to Ti and Al reduces the swelling associated with reactive sintering of TiAl, as composites containing more than 5 vol%Ti5Si3 densified during reactive sintering. However, composites containing more than 10 vol%Ti5Si3 did not retain their shape and the TiAl+20 vol%Ti5Si3 composite completely melted during the sintering process. A thermodynamic analysis indicated that the simultaneous formation of TiAl and Ti5Si3 increases the adiabatic flame temperature during the reaction between the powders. In fact, the analysis predicted that the maximum temperature of the reaction associated with the formation TiAl+20 vol%Ti5Si3 should exceed the melting point of TiAl, and this was observed experimentally. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed that an Al–Si eutectic reaction occurred in mixtures of Ti, Al and Si powders prior to the formation of the TiAl and Ti5Si3 phases. There was no such pre-reaction formation of a eutectic liquid in Ti and Al powder mixtures. The formation of the pre-reaction liquid and the increase in adiabatic flame temperature resulted in the melting that occurred and the enhanced densification (minimization of swelling) during reactive sintering of the in situ composites.
Date: June 1, 2005
Creator: Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Method for making devices having intermetallic structures and intermetallic devices made thereby

Description: A method and system for making a monolithic intermetallic structure are presented. The structure is made from lamina blanks which comprise multiple layers of metals which are patternable, or intermetallic lamina blanks that are patternable. Lamina blanks are patterned, stacked and registered, and processed to form a monolithic intermetallic structure. The advantages of a patterned monolithic intermetallic structure include physical characteristics such as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance. Applications are broad, and include among others, use as a microreactor, heat recycling device, and apparatus for producing superheated steam. Monolithic intermetallic structures may contain one or more catalysts within the internal features.
Date: January 6, 2004
Creator: Paul, Brian Kevin; Wilson, Rick D. & Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microchannel devices

Description: The fabrication of stainless steel microchannel heat exchangers was examined through microlamination, the process of diffusion bonding precision machined metallic foils. The influence of diffusion bonding parameters, as well as the device geometry on the strength of the bond between the foils and embedded channel integrity, was investigated. During diffusion bonding, high temperatures and/or pressures result in well bonded foils, but these conditions cause the embedded channels to deform, which will degrade the efficiency of fluid flow through the channels. Alternatively, low temperatures and/or pressures result in undeformed channels but weakly bonded foils. This causes failure of the device due to fluid leakage. Thus, a processing envelope exists for producing a sound device with no fluid leakage and no degradation of fluid flow properties. The theoretical limit on aspect ratio within two-fluid counter-flow microchannel heat exchangers was also investigated. A counter-flow device is comprised of alternating layers of microchannels, which allow the two fluids to flow in opposite directions separated by fins. A theoretical model for interpreting the span of the fin as a function of the fin thickness was established. The model was verified experimentally by fabricating specimens to simulate the counter-flow device. The results of these investigations were used to aid in the design and processing of prototype microchannel devices.
Date: September 1, 2001
Creator: Alman, David E. & Wilson, Rick D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

Description: A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost
Date: November 5, 2002
Creator: Dunning, John S. & Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of chromium-tungsten alloys

Description: Cr alloys containing 0-30 weight % W were investigated for their high temperature strength and oxidation resistance. These experimental alloys are intended for use in elevated temperature applications. Alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. Meyer and Vickers hardness tests were utilized for measuring room temperature strength. A hot hardness tester with a spherical ruby indenter was used to study the strength of these materials between 800ºC and 1200ºC. A parabolic relationship was observed between load and indent size at all temperatures. On the other hand, decrease in hardness of the alloys with temperature was linear up to 1200ºC.
Date: March 1, 2004
Creator: Dogan, Omer N.; Alman, David E. & Hawk, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel alloys for potential use as interconnects in SOFC

Description: This paper deals with the development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel-base superalloys for potential use as interconnects for SOFC. Ni-Mo-Cr alloys were formulated with CTE on the order of 12.5 to 13.5 x10-6/°C. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and reduced to sheet via a combination of hot and cold working. Dilatometry was used to measure CTE of the alloys. Oxidation behavior of the alloys at 800°C in dry and moist air is reported. The results are compared to results for Haynes 230 (a commercial Ni-base superalloy) and for Crofer 22APU (a commercial ferritic stainless steel designed specifically for use as an SOFC interconnect).
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Alman, David E. & Jablonski, Paul D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect of Manganese Additions on the Reactive Evaporation of Chromium in Ni-Cr Alloys

Description: Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 C and 55 at 700 C. The results of evaporation loss measurements on nickel-chromium-manganese alloys are compared with the predicted reduction. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.
Date: October 20, 2004
Creator: Holcomb, Gordon R. & Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructure of Titanium Welds

Description: Plates of commercially pure titanium were welded and microscopically analyzed to understand the influence of joining variables on weld microstructure.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Danielson, Paul; Wilson, Rick D. & Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidation and sulfidation resistant alloys with silicon additions

Description: The Albany Research Center (ARC) has considerable experience in developing lean chromium, austenitic stainless steels with improved high temperature oxidation resistance. Using basic alloy design principles, a baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo alloys with Si and Al addition at a maximum of 5 weight percent was selected for potential application at temperatures above 700ºC for supercritical and ultra-supercritical power plant application. The alloys were fully austenitic. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700ºC to 800ºC. Oxidation resistances of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800ºC (i.e., these alloys possessed weight gains 4 times less than a standard type-304 alloy). In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800ºC, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700ºC. Similar improvements were observed for Si only alloy after H2S exposure at 700ºC compared with type 304 stainless steel. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms at ARC. Depth profile analysis and element concentration profiles (argon ion etching/x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) were conducted on oxidized specimens and base material at the National Energy Technology Laboratory.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Poston, J.A., Jr. (NETL) & Siriwardane, R. (NETL)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultra supercritical turbines--steam oxidation

Description: Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538?C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620?C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760?C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret & Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

Description: Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M. & Alman, David E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Understanding the corrosion behavior of chromia-forming 316L stainless steel in dual oxidizing-reducing environment representative of SOFC interconnect

Description: A and B site doped LaCrO3-based electronically conducting Perovskite ceramic materials have been extensively used as interconnects in solid oxide fule cells (SOFC) operating at 800° to 1000°C as the Perovskites offer good electrical conductivity, chemical compatibility with the adjacent components of the fuel cell, chemical stability in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and thermal expansion coefficients that match other cell components. However, requirements for good mechanical properties, electrical and thermal conductivities, and low cost make metallic interconnects more promising. Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of SOFC from ~1000°C to ~750°C is expected to permit the use of metallic materials with substantial cost reduction. Among the commercially available metallic materials, Cr2O3 (chromia) scale-forming iron base alloys appear to be the most promising candidates since they can fulfill the technical and economical requirements. These alloys, however, remain prone to reactions with oxygen and water vapor at fuel cell operating conditions and formation of gaseous chromium oxides and oxyhydroxides. To study the degradation processes and corrosion mechanisms of commercial chromia scale-forming alloys under SOFC interconnect exposure conditions, 316L was selected for this research because of the availability of the materials. The dual environment to which the interconnect material was exposed consisted of dry air (simulates the cathode side environment) and a mixture of H2 and 3% H2O (simulates the anode side environment). Post-corrosion surface evaluation involved the use of optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as energy dispersive X-ray analyses.
Date: November 1, 2003
Creator: Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Matthes, Steven A.; Bullard, Sophie J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidation Resistance of Low Carbon Stainless Steel for Applications in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

Description: Alloys protected from corrosion by Cr2O3 (chromia) are recognized as potential replacements for LaCrO3–based ceramic materials currently used as bipolar separators (interconnects) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Stainless steels gain their corrosion resistance from the formation of chromia, when exposed to oxygen at elevated temperatures. Materials for interconnect applications must form uniform conductive oxide scales at 600–800o C while simultaneously exposed to air on the cathode side and mixtures of H2 - H2O, and, possibly, CHx and CO - CO2 on the anode side. In addition, they must possess good physical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Type 316L stainless steel was selected for the baseline study and development of an understanding of corrosion processes in complex gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel exposed to dual SOFC environment for ~100 hours at ~900oK. The dual environment consisted of dry air on the cathode side of the specimen and a mixture of H2 and 3% H2O on the anode side. Post - corrosion surface evaluation involved the use of optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Matthes, Steven A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion behavior of stainless steel in solid oxide fuel cell simulated gaseous environment

Description: Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) from {approx}1000 C to {approx} 750 C may permit the replacement of currently used ceramic interconnects by metallic interconnects in planar SOFCs (PSOFC). The use of metallic interconnects will result in a substantial cost reduction of PSOFCs. The interconnects operate in severe gaseous environments, in which one side of the interconnect can be exposed to hydrogen and the other side to air or oxygen at temperatures up to 800 C. Similar environmental conditions can exist in devices used for separating hydrogen from CO after reforming methane and steam. Type 304 stainless steel was selected for this base line study aimed at understanding corrosion processes in dual gas environments. This paper discusses the oxidation resistance of 304 stainless steel exposed to a dual environment gas at 800 C. The dual environment consisted of air on one side of the specimen and 1% hydrogen in nitrogen on the other side. The surface characterization techniques used in this study were optical and scanning electron microscopy, as well as various x-ray techniques.
Date: January 2003
Creator: Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Matthes, Steven A.; Bullard, Sophie J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved Austenitic Steels for Power Plant Applications

Description: Using alloy design principles, an austenitic alloy, with base composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo (in weight percent, wt%), was formulated to which up to 5 wt% Si and/or Al were added specifically to improve the oxidation resistance. Cyclic oxidation tests were carried out in air at 700 and 800 C for 1000 hours. For comparison, Fe-18Cr-8Ni type-304 stainless steel alloys was also tested. The results showed that at 700 C, all the alloys were twice as oxidation resistant as the type-304 alloy (i.e., the experimental alloys showed weight gains about half that of type-304). Surprisingly, at 800 C, alloys that contained both Al and Si additions were less oxidation resistant than the type-304 alloy. However, alloys containing only Si additions were significantly more oxidation resistant than the type 304 alloys (i.e., showed weight gains 4 times less than the type-304 alloy). Further, alloys with only Si additions pre-oxidized at 800 C, showed zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700 C. This implies the potential for producing in-situ protective coating for these alloys. Preliminary exposure tests (1%H2S at 700 C for 360 hrs) indicated that the Si-modified alloys are more sulfidation resistant than type-304 alloy. The mechanical properties of the alloys, modified with carbide forming elements, were also evaluated; and at 600, 700 and 800 C the yield stresses of the carbide modified alloys were twice that of type-304 stainless steel. In this temperature range, the tensile properties of these alloys were comparable to literature values for type-347 stainless steel. It should be emphasized that the microstructures of the carbide forming alloys were not optimized with respect to grain size, carbide size and/or carbide distribution. Also, presented are initial results of vari-strain weld tests used to determine parameters for joining these alloys.
Date: August 6, 2002
Creator: Alman, David E.; Dunning, John S.; Schrems, Karol K.; Rawers, James C.; Wilson, Rick D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department