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Femtosecond Operation of the LCLS for User Experiments

Description: In addition to its normal operation at 250pC, the LCLS has operated with 20pC bunches delivering X-ray beams to users with energies between 800eV and 2 keV and with bunch lengths below 10 fs FWHM. A bunch arrival time monitor and timing transmission system provide users with sub 50 fs synchronization between a laser and the X-rays for pump/probe experiments. We describe the performance and operational experience of the LCLS for short bunch experiments.
Date: September 2, 2010
Creator: Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; Bostedt, Christoph; /SLAC; Bozek, John; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

Description: The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.
Date: June 25, 2012
Creator: Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polarimetery for SuperB

Description: We provide an overview description of a Compton polarimeter for measuring electron beam polarization near the IR in the Low Energy Ring of SuperB. The polarimeter is designed to achieve 1.0% accuracy. A scheme for measuring the electron beam polarization at SuperB near the IR has been described. The Compton polarimeter has been designed to fit into the existing lattice of the SuperB ring and results in a Compton IP measuring the polarization located where the beam is almost longitudinal with opposite helicity to that at the IR. The polarization at the IR is expected to be determined with an accuracy of {approx}1% from the measurement at the Compton IP provided the beam direction at the electron-positron interaction region and the Compton IP are well known and the beam energy is measured to better than 20 MeV. Detailed detector studies are needed to study resolution and acceptance effects on detector analyzing powers, and to determine sensitivity to beam and machine parameters.
Date: July 6, 2012
Creator: Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC; Field, R.; /SLAC; Moffeit, Kenneth; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

X-Band Photoinjector Beam Dynamics

Description: SLAC is studying the feasibility of using an X-band RF photocathode gun to produce low emittance bunches for applications such as a mono-energetic MeV {gamma} ray source (in collaboration with LLNL) and a photoinjector for a compact FEL. Beam dynamics studies are being done for a configuration consisting of a 5.5-cell X-band gun followed by several 53-cell high-gradient X-band accelerator structures. A fully 3D program, ImpactT, is used to track particles taking into account space charge forces, short-range longitudinal and transverse wakefields, and the 3D rf fields in the structures, including the quadrupole component of the couplers. The effect of misalignments of the various elements, including the drive-laser, gun, solenoid and accelerator structures, are evaluated. This paper presents these results and estimates of the expected bunch emittance vs cathode gradient, and the effects of mixing between the fundamental and off-frequency longitudinal modes. An X-band gun at SLAC has been shown to operate reliably with a 200 MV/m acceleration gradient at the cathode, which is nearly twice the 115 MV/m acceleration gradient in the LCLS gun. The higher gradient should roughly balance the space charge related transverse emittance growth for the same bunch charge but provide a 3-4 times shorter bunch length. The shorter length would make the subsequent bunch compression easier and allow for a more effective use of emittance exchange. Such a gun can also be used with an X-band linac to produce a compact FEL or g ray source that would require rf sources of only one frequency for beam generation and acceleration. The feasibility of using an X-band rf photocathode gun and accelerator structures to generate high quality electron beams for compact FELs and g ray sources is being studied at SLAC. Results from the X-band photoinjector beam dynamics studies are reported in this paper.
Date: December 13, 2011
Creator: Zhou, Feng; /SLAC; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BPM Design and Impedance Considerations for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Collimation Upgrade

Description: The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the 30 high robust Phase I graphite secondary collimators with 30 high Z Phase II collimators. This paper reports on BPM and impedance considerations and measurements of the integrated BPMs in the prototype rotatable collimator to be installed in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN. The BPMs are necessary to align the jaws with the beam. Without careful design the beam impedance can result in unacceptable heating of the chamber wall or beam instabilities. The impedance measurements involve utilizing both a single displaced wire and two wires excited in opposite phase to disentangle the driving and detuning transverse impedances. Trapped mode resonances and longitudinal impedance are to also be measured and compared with simulations. These measurements, when completed, will demonstrate the device is fully operational and has the impedance characteristics and BPM performance acceptable for installation in the SPS.
Date: August 26, 2010
Creator: Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; /SLAC; Keller, Lewis; /SLAC; Lundgren, Steven; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Longitudinal Wakefield Study in SLAC Rotatable Collimator Design for the LHC Phase II Upgrade

Description: SLAC proposed a rotatable collimator design for the LHC Phase II collimation upgrade. There are 20 facet faces on each cylindrical jaw surface and two jaws are rotatable in order to introduce a clean surface in case of a beam hitting a jaw during operation. When the beam crosses the collimator, it will excite broad-band and narrow-band modes. The longitudinal modes can contribute to beam energy loss and power dissipation on the vacuum chamber wall. In this paper, the parallel finite element eigensolver Omega3P is used to search for all the longitudinal trapped modes in the SLAC collimator design. The power dissipation generated by the beam in collimators with different vacuum chamber and RF contact designs is discussed. It is found that a wider RF foil connecting the jaw and the vacuum flange can reduce efficiently the beam heating caused by the longitudinal modes.
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Xiao, Liling; /SLAC; Lundgren, Steven; /SLAC; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Identifying Longitudinal Jitter Sources in the LCLS Linac

Description: The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is an x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 0.15 nm to 1.5 nm. The electron beam stability is important for good lasing. While the transverse jitter of the beam is about 10-20% of the rms beam sizes, the jitter in the longitudinal phase space is a multiple of the energy spread and bunch length. At the lower energy of 4.3 GeV (corresponding to the longest wavelength of 1.5 nm) the relative energy jitter can be 0.125%, while the rms energy spread is with 0.025% five times smaller. An even bigger ratio exists for the arrival time jitter of 50 fs and the bunch duration of about 5 fs (rms) in the low charge (20 pC) operating mode. Although the impact to the experiments is reduced by providing pulse-by-pulse data of the measured energy and arrival time, it would be nice to understand and mitigate the root causes of this jitter. The thyratron of the high power supply of the RF klystrons is one of the main contributors. Another suspect is the multi-pacting in the RF loads. Phase measurements down to 0.01 degree (equals 10 fs) along the RF pulse were achieved, giving hints to the impact of the different sources.
Date: July 6, 2012
Creator: Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC; Akre, Ron; /SLAC; Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Linac Energy Management for LCLS

Description: Linac Energy Management (LEM) is a control system program that scales magnet field set-point settings following a change in beam energy. LEM is necessary because changes in the number, phase, and amplitude of the active klystrons change the beam's rigidity, and therefore, to maintain constant optics, one has to change focusing gradients and bend fields accordingly. This paper describes the basic process, the control system application programs we developed for LEM, and some of the implementation lessons learned at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).
Date: July 5, 2012
Creator: Chu, Chungming; /SLAC; Iverson, Richard; /SLAC; Krejcik, Patrick; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A 12 GHZ 50 MW Klystron for Support of Accelerator Research

Description: A 12 GHz 50MW X-band klystron is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department. The klystron will be fabricated to support programs currently underway at three European Labs; CERN, PSI, and INFN Trieste. The choice of frequency selection was due to the CLIC RF frequency changing from 30 GHz to the European X-band frequency of 11.99 GHz in 2008. Since the Klystron Department currently builds 50MW klystrons at 11.424 GHz known collectively as the XL4 klystrons, it was deemed cost-effective to utilize many XL4 components by leaving the gun, electron beam transport, solenoid magnet and collector unchanged. To realize the rf parameters required, the rf cavities and rf output hardware were necessarily altered. Some improvements to the rf design have been made to reduce operating gradients and increase reliability. Changes in the multi-cell output structure, waveguide components, and the window will be discussed along with testing of the devices. Five klystrons known as XL5 klystrons are scheduled for production over the next two years.
Date: May 31, 2011
Creator: Sprehn, Daryl; /SLAC; Haase, Andrew; /SLAC; Jensen, Aaron; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

Description: The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.
Date: June 2, 2011
Creator: Weathersby, Stephen; /SLAC; Novokhatski, Alexander & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RF Choke for Standing Wave Structures and Flanges

Description: SLAC participates in the U.S. High Gradient collaboration whose charter includes basic studies of rf breakdown properties in accelerating structures. These studies include experiments with different materials and construction methods for single cell standing wave accelerating structures. The most commonly used method of joining cells of such structures is the high temperature bonding and/or brazing in hydrogen and/or vacuum. These high temperature processes may not be suitable for some of the new materials that are under consideration. We propose to build structures from cells with an rf choke, taking the cell-to-cell junction out of the electromagnetic field region. These cells may be clamped together in a vacuum enclosure, the choke joint ensuring continuity of rf currents. Next, we propose a structure with a choke joint in a high gradient cell and a view port which may allow us microscopic, in-situ observation of the metal surface during high power tests. And third, we describe the design of a TM01 choke flange for these structures.
Date: July 3, 2012
Creator: Yeremian, Anahid; /SLAC; Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLRF System Upgrade for the SLAC Linac

Description: The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is in full user operation and has met the stability goals for stable lasing. The 250pC bunch can be compressed to below 100fS before passing through an undulator. In a new mode of operation a 20pC bunch is compressed to about 10fS. Experimenters are regularly using this shorter X-ray pulse and getting pristine data. The 10fS bunch has timing jitter on the order of 100fS. Physicists are requesting that the RF system achieve better stability to reduce timing jitter. Drifts in the RF system require longitudinal feedbacks to work over large ranges and errors result in reduced performance of the LCLS. A new RF system is being designed to help diagnose and reduce jitter and drift in the SLAC linac.
Date: July 6, 2012
Creator: Hong, Bo; /SLAC; Akre, Ron; /SLAC; Pacak, Vojtech & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Dual-Moded Cavity for RF Breakdown Studies

Description: The phenomenon of rf breakdown presents a technological limitation in the application of high-gradient particle acceleration in normal conducting rf structures. Attempts to understand the onset of this phenomenon and to study its limits with different materials, cell shapes, and pulse widths has been driven in recent years by linear collider development. One question of interest is the role magnetic field plays relative to electric field. A design is presented for a single, nonaccelerating, rf cavity resonant in two modes, which, driven independently, allow the rf magnetic field to be increased on the region of highest electric field without affecting the latter. The design allows for the potential reuse of the cavity with different samples in the high-field region. High power data is not yet available.
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Nantista, Christopher; /SLAC; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Wang, Faya & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ELECTRON TRAPPING IN WIGGLER AND QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS OF CESRTA

Description: The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as an ultra low emittance damping ring for use as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring R&D [1]. One of the primary goals of the CesrTA program is to investigate the interaction of the electron cloud with low emittance positron beam to explore methods to suppress the electron cloud, develop suitable advanced instrumentation required for these experimental studies and benchmark predictions by simulation codes. This paper reports the simulation of the electron-cloud formation in the wiggler and quadrupole magnets using the 3D code CLOUDLAND. We found that electrons can be trapped with long lifetime in a quadrupole magnet due to the mirror field trapping mechanism and photoelectrons produced in the wiggler zero field zone have long lifetime due to their complicated trajectory.
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC; Pivi, Mauro & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lattice Development for Pep-X High Brightness Light Source

Description: Design of PEP-X high brightness light source machine is under development at SLAC. The PEP-X is a proposed replacement for the PEP-II in the existing 2.2 km tunnel. Two of the PEP-X six arcs contain DBA type lattice providing 30 dispersion free straights suitable for 3.5 m long undulators. The lattice contains TME cells in the other four arcs and 89.3 m wiggler in a long straight section yielding a horizontal emittance of {approx}0.1 nm-rad at 4.5 GeV. The recent lattice modifications are aimed at increasing the predicted brightness and improving beam dynamic properties. The standard DBA cells are modified into supercells for providing low-{beta} undulator straights. The DBA and TME cell phase advance is better optimized. Harmonic sextupoles are added to minimize the sextupole driven resonance effects and amplitude dependent tune shift. Finally, the injection scheme is changed from vertical to horizontal plane in order to avoid large vertical amplitudes of injected beam within small vertical aperture of undulators.
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC; Wang, Min-Huey & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Two-Dimensional Fem Code for Impedance Calculation in High Frequency Domain

Description: A new method, using the parabolic equation (PE), for the calculation of both high-frequency impedances of small-angle taper (or collimator) is developed in [1]. One of the most important advantages of the PE approach is that it eliminates the spatial scale of the small wavelength from the problem. As a result, only coarser spatial meshes are needed in calculating the numerical solution of the PE. We developed a new code based on Finite Element Method (FEM) which can handle arbitrary profile of a transition and speed up the calculation by orders of magnitude. As a first step, we completed and benchmarked a two-dimensional code. It can be upgraded to three-dimensional geometry.
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC; Lee, Lie-Quan; /SLAC; Stupakov, Gennady & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of Dynamic Aperture of PEP-X Baseline Design

Description: SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing photon source. Storage ring design is one of the possibilities that would be housed in the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel. The design goal of PEPX storage ring is to approach an optimal light source design with horizontal emittance less than 100 pm and vertical emittance of 8 pm to reach the diffraction limit of 1-{angstrom} x-ray. The low emittance design requires a lattice with strong focusing leading to high natural chromaticity and therefore to strong sextupoles. The latter caused reduction of dynamic aperture. The dynamic aperture requirement for horizontal injection at injection point is about 10 mm. In order to achieve the desired dynamic aperture the transverse non-linearity of PEP-X is studied. The program LEGO is used to simulate the particle motion. The technique of frequency map is used to analyze the nonlinear behavior. The effect of the non-linearity is tried to minimize at the given constrains of limited space. The details and results of dynamic aperture optimization are discussed in this paper.
Date: August 23, 2010
Creator: Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Injected Beam Dynamics in SPEAR3

Description: For the top-off operation it is important to understand the time evolution of charge injected into the storage ring. The large-amplitude horizontal oscillation quickly filaments and decoheres, and in some cases exhibits non-linear x-y coupling before damping to the stored orbit. Similarly, in the longitudinal dimension, any mismatch in beam arrival time, beam energy or phase-space results in damped, non-linear synchrotron oscillations. In this paper we report on measurements of injection beam dynamics in the transverse and longitudinal planes using turn-by-turn BPMs, a fast-gated, image-intensified CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera.
Date: June 21, 2012
Creator: Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC; Huang, Xiaobiao; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling

Description: In the Phase I SBIR we proposed a ParaView-based solution to provide an environment for individuals to actively collaborate in the visualization process. The technical objectives of Phase I were: (1) to determine the set of features required for an effect collaborative system; (2) to implement a two-person collaborative prototype; and (3) to implement key collaborative features such as control locking and annotation. Accordingly, we implemented a ParaView-based collaboration prototype with support for collaborating with up to four simultaneous clients. We also implemented collaborative features such as control locking, chatting, annotation etc. Due to in part of the flexibility provided by the ParaView framework and the design features implemented in the prototype, we were able to support collaboration with multiple views, instead of a simple give as initially proposed in Phase I. In this section we will summarize the results we obtained during the Phase I project. ParaView is complex, scalable, client-server application framework built on top of the VTK visualization engine. During the implementation of the Phase I prototype, we realized that the ParaView framework naturally supports collaboration technology; hence we were able to go beyond the proposed Phase I prototype in several ways. For example, we were able to support for multiple views, enable server-as well as client-side rendering, and manage up to four heterogeneous clients. The success we achieved with Phase I clearly demonstrated the technical feasibility of the ParaView based collaborative framework we are proposing in the Phase II effort. We also investigated using the web browser as one of the means of participating in a collaborative session. This would enable non-visualization experts to participate in the collaboration process without being intimidated by a complex application such as ParaView. Hence we also developed a prototype web visualization applet that makes it possible for interactive visualization over ...
Date: August 25, 2010
Creator: Schussman, Greg & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commissioning of the LHC Low Level RF System Remote Configuration Tools

Description: The LHC Low Level RF system (LLRF) is a complex multi-loop system used to regulate the superconductive cavity gap voltage as well as to reduce the impedance presented by RF stations to the beam. The RF system can have a profound impact on the stability of the beam; a mis-configured RF system has the potential of causing longitudinal instabilities, beam diffusion and beam loss. To configure the RF station for operation, a set of parameters in the LLRF multi-loop system have to be defined. Initial system commissioning as well as ongoing operation requires a consistent method of computer based remote measurement and model-based design of each RF station feedback system. This paper describes the suite of Matlab tools used for configuring the LHC RF system during the start up in Nov2009-Feb2010. We present a brief overview of the tool, examples of commissioning results, and basics of the model-based design algorithms. This work complements our previous presentation, where the algorithms and methodology followed in the tools were described.
Date: August 26, 2010
Creator: Van Winkle, Daniel; /SLAC; Fox, John; /SLAC; Mastorides, Themis; /SLAC et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

e+ e- Factory Developments

Description: The impressive performance of current (KEKB) and recent (PEP-II) B-Factory colliders has increased interest in developing even higher luminosity B-factories. Two new designs are being developed (SuperKEKB and SuperB). Both designs plan to deliver a luminosity in the range of 1 x 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, nearly 100 times the present B-factory level. Achieving this high luminosity requires high-current beams and short bunch lengths and/or a new way of colliding the beams. The SuperB design employs a crabbed magnetic waist with a large crossing angle and the SuperKEKB design is looking at crab cavities with high-current beams and/or a travelling focus. I describe the designs being studied to achieve the high luminosity needed for the next generation of B-Factories.
Date: August 26, 2010
Creator: Sullivan, Michael & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small Steps Towards a Grand Unification and the Electron/Positron Excesses in Cosmic-Ray Experiments

Description: We consider a small extension of the standard model by adding two Majorana fermions; those are adjoint representations of the SU(2){sub L} and SU(3){sub c} gauge groups of the standard model. In this extension, the gauge coupling unification at an energy scale higher than 10{sup 15} GeV is realized when the masses of the triplet and the octet fermions are smaller than 10{sup 4} GeV and 10{sup 12} GeV, respectively. We also show that an appropriate symmetry ensures a long lifetime of the neutral component of the triplet fermion whose thermal relic density naturally explains the observed dark matter density. The electron/positron excesses observed in recent cosmic-ray experiments can be also explained by the decay of the triplet fermion.
Date: June 11, 2010
Creator: Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC & ,
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

Description: Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.
Date: July 6, 2012
Creator: Park, Sanghyun; /SLAC; Corbett, Jeff & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department