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Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

Description: Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. The PDP evaluates analyses of simulated headspace gases, constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.
Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: /A, N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RF and structural characterization of new SRF films

Description: In the past years, energetic vacuum deposition methods have been developed in different laboratories to improve Nb/Cu technology for superconducting cavities. Jefferson Lab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. As part of this study, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated. The film surface and structure analyses are conducted with various techniques like X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Auger Electron Spectroscopy and RHEED. The microwave properties of the films are characterized on 50 mm disk samples with a 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system. This paper presents surface impedance measurements in correlation with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on copper substrates with different bias voltages and also highlights emerging opportunities for developing multilayer SRF films with a new deposition system.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: A.-M. Valente-Feliciano,H. L. Phillips,C. E. Reece,X. Zhao,D. Gu,R. Lukaszew,B. Xiao,K. Seo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

Description: This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations become the ...
Date: April 23, 2009
Creator: A.A. Schekochihin, S.C. Cowley, W. Dorland, G.W. Hammett, G.G. Howes, E. Quataert, and T. Tatsuno
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diagnostics for the Biased Electrode Experiment on NSTX

Description: A linear array of four small biased electrodes was installed in NSTX in an attempt to control the width of the scrape-off layer (SOL) by creating a strong local poloidal electric field. The set of electrodes were separated poloidally by a 1 cm gap between electrodes and were located slightly below the midplane of NSTX, 1 cm behind the RF antenna and oriented so that each electrode is facing approximately normal to the magnetic field. Each electrode can be independently biased to ±100 volts. Present power supplies limit the current on two electrodes to 30 amps the other two to 10 amps each. The effect of local biasing was measured with a set of Langmuir probes placed between the electrodes and another set extending radially outward from the electrodes, and also by the gas puff imaging diagnostic (GPI) located 1 m away along the magnetic field lines intersecting the electrodes. Two fast cameras were also aimed directly at the electrode array. The hardware and controls of the biasing experiment will be presented and the initial effects on local plasma parameters will be discussed.
Date: March 20, 2009
Creator: A.L. Roquemore, S.J. Zweben, C.E. Bush, R. Kaita, R. J. Marsalsa, and R.J. Maqueda
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CRYSTALLIZATION IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASSES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION WTP ENGINEERING DIVISION

Description: Various circumstances influence crystallization in glassmaking, for example: (1) crystals nucleate and grow before the glass-forming melt occurs; (2) crystals grow or dissolve in flowing melt and during changing temperature; (3) crystals move under the influence of gravity; (4) crystals agglomerate and interact with gas bubbles; (5) high-level wastes (HLW) are mixtures of a large number of components in unusual proportions; (6) melter processing of HLW and the slow cooling of HLW glass in canisters provides an opportunity for a variety of crystalline forms to precipitate; (7) settling of crystals in a HLW glass melter may produce undesirable sludge at the melter bottom; and (8) crystallization of the glass product may increase, but also ruin chemical durability. The conclusions are: (1) crystal growth and dissolution typically proceed in a convective medium at changing temperature; (2) to represent crystallization or dissolution the kinetics must be expressed in the form of rate equations, such as dC/dt = f(C,T) and the temperature dependence of kinetic coefficients and equilibrium concentrations must be accounted for; and (3) non-equilibrium phenomena commonly occur - metastable crystallization, periodic distribution of crystals; and dendritic crystal growth.
Date: August 19, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER & PR, HRMA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

Description: In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.
Date: October 8, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER & PR, HRMA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GLASS FORMULATION FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP)

Description: A computational method for formulating Hanford HLW glasses was developed that is based on empirical glass composition-property models, accounts for all associated uncertainties, and can be solved in Excel{sup R} in minutes. Calculations for all waste form processing and compliance requirements included. Limited experimental validation performed.
Date: May 27, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER; JD, VIENNA; DS, KIM & V, JAIN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

Description: This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active ...
Date: December 30, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER; KS, MATLACK; WK, KOT; IL, PEGG & I, JOSEPH
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EFFECT OF MELTER-FEED-MAKEUP ON VITRIFICATION PROCESS

Description: Increasing the rate of glass processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will allow shortening the life cycle of waste cleanup at the Hanford Site. While the WTP melters have approached the limit of increasing the rate of melting by enhancing the heat transfer rate from molten glass to the cold cap, a substantial improvement can still be achieved by accelerating the feed-to-glass conversion kinetics. This study investigates how the feed-to-glass conversion process responds to the feed makeup. By identifying the means of control of primary foam formation and silica grain dissolution, it provides data needed for a meaningful and economical design of large-scale experiments aimed at achieving faster melting.
Date: September 10, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER; PR, HRMA; MJ, SCHWEIGER; CJ, HUMRICKHOUSE; JA, MOODY; RM, TATE et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

Description: Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.
Date: November 5, 2009
Creator: AA, KRUGER; Z, FENG; H, GAN & IL, PEGG
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ground motion modeling of Hayward fault scenario earthquakes II:Simulation of long-period and broadband ground motions

Description: We simulate long-period (T > 1.0-2.0 s) and broadband (T > 0.1 s) ground motions for 39 scenarios earthquakes (Mw 6.7-7.2) involving the Hayward, Calaveras, and Rodgers Creek faults. For rupture on the Hayward fault we consider the effects of creep on coseismic slip using two different approaches, both of which reduce the ground motions compared with neglecting the influence of creep. Nevertheless, the scenario earthquakes generate strong shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area with about 50% of the urban area experiencing MMI VII or greater for the magnitude 7.0 scenario events. Long-period simulations of the 2007 Mw 4.18 Oakland and 2007 Mw 4.5 Alum Rock earthquakes show that the USGS Bay Area Velocity Model version 08.3.0 permits simulation of the amplitude and duration of shaking throughout the San Francisco Bay area, with the greatest accuracy in the Santa Clara Valley (San Jose area). The ground motions exhibit a strong sensitivity to the rupture length (or magnitude), hypocenter (or rupture directivity), and slip distribution. The ground motions display a much weaker sensitivity to the rise time and rupture speed. Peak velocities, peak accelerations, and spectral accelerations from the synthetic broadband ground motions are, on average, slightly higher than the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) ground-motion prediction equations. We attribute at least some of this difference to the relatively narrow width of the Hayward fault ruptures. The simulations suggest that the Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to the NGA relations could be improved by including a dependence on the rupture speed and increasing the areal extent of rupture directivity with period. The simulations also indicate that the NGA relations may under-predict amplification in shallow sedimentary basins.
Date: November 4, 2009
Creator: Aagaard, B T; Graves, R W; Rodgers, A; Brocher, T M; Simpson, R W; Dreger, D et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of the $\ttbar$ Production Cross Section in 2 fb$^{-1}$ of $\ppbar$ Collisions at $\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV Using Lepton Plus Jets Events with Soft Muon b-Tagging

Description: We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using events containing a high transverse momentum electron or muon, three or more jets, and missing transverse energy. Events consistent with t{bar t} decay are found by identifying jets containing candidate heavy-flavor semileptonic decays to muons. The measurement uses a CDF Run II data sample corresponding to 2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Based on 248 candidate events with three or more jets and an expected background of 79.5 {+-} 5.3 events, we measure a production cross section of 9.1 {+-} 1.6 pb.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Aaltonen, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

Description: We present the first direct measurement of the W production charge asymmetry as a function of the W boson rapidity y{sub W} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use a sample of W {yields} e{nu} events in data from 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected using the CDF II detector. In the region |y{sub W}| < 3.0, this measurement is capable of constraining the ratio of up and down quark momentum distributions in the proton more directly than in previous measurements of the asymmetry that are a function of the charged-lepton pseudorapidity.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Aaltonen, T.; Phys., /Helsinki Inst. of; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; U., /Tsukuba et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First Measurement of the b-jet Cross Section in Events with a W Boson in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

Description: The cross section for jets from b quarks produced simultaneously with a W boson has been measured in p{bar p} collision data from 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. Jets consistent with the decay of long-lived hadrons are selected by identifying a displaced decay vertex. The invariant mass of the charged particle tracks associated with the vertex is sensitive to the flavor of the decaying hadron and is used to determine the fraction of jets from b-quark production. We measure a b-jet cross section of 2.74 {+-} 0.27(stat.) {+-} 0.42(syst.) pb in association with one flavor of leptonic W boson decay over a limited kinematic phase space.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Aaltonen, T.; Phys., /Helsinki Inst. of; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; U., /Tsukuba et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of d sigma/dy of Drell-Yan e+ e- pairs in the Z Mass Region from p anti-p Collisions at s88(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

Description: We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M{sub ee} < 116 GeV/c{sup 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 256 {+-} 16 pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between data and theory except at large rapidity for which further tuning of PDF models may be needed.
Date: August 1, 2009
Creator: Aaltonen, T.; Phys., /Helsinki Inst. of; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; U., /Tsukuba et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of the top quark mass at CDF using the `neutrino phi weighting' template method on a lepton plus isolated track sample

Description: We present a measurement of the top quark mass with t{bar t} dilepton events produced in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron ({radical}s = 1.96 TeV) and collected by the CDF II detector. A sample of 328 events with a charged electron or muon and an isolated track, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 fb{sup -1}, are selected as t{bar t} candidates. To account for the unconstrained event kinematics, we scan over the phase space of the azimuthal angles ({phi}{sub {nu}1}, {phi}{sub {nu}2}) of neutrinos and reconstruct the top quark mass for each {phi}{sub {nu}1}, {phi}{sub {nu}2} pair by minimizing a {chi}{sup 2} function in the t{bar t} dilepton hypothesis. We assign {chi}{sup 2}-dependent weights to the solutions in order to build a preferred mass for each event. Preferred mass distributions (templates) are built from simulated t{bar t} and background events, and parameterized in order to provide continuous probability density functions. A likelihood fit to the mass distribution in data as a weighted sum of signal and background probability density functions gives a top quark mass of 165.5{sub -3.3}{sup +3.4}(stat.){+-}3.1(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Aaltonen, T.; Phys., /Helsinki Inst. of; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; U., /Tsukuba et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurements of the top-quark mass using charged particle tracking

Description: We present three measurements of the top-quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel with approximately 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector using quantities with minimal dependence on the jet energy scale. One measurement exploits the transverse decay length of b-tagged jets to determine a top-quark mass of 166.9{sub -8.5}{sup +9.5} (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, and another the transverse momentum of electrons and muons from W-boson decays to determine a top-quark mass of 173.5{sub -8.9}{sup +8.8} (stat) {+-} 3.8 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}. These quantities are combined in a third, simultaneous mass measurement to determine a top-quark mass of 170.7 {+-} 6.3 (stat) {+-} 2.6 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Aaltonen, T.; Phys., /Helsinki Inst. of; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; U., /Tsukuba et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department