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3-D Seismic Experimentation and Advanced Processing/Inversion Development for Investigations of the Shallow Subsurface

Description: Under ER63662, 3-D Seismic Experimentation and Advanced Processing/Inversion Development for Investigations of the Shallow Subsurface, we have completed a number of subprojects associated with the Hill Air Force Base (HAFB) high resolution 3-D reflection/tomography dataset.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Levander, Alan R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2004 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

Description: The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of BPA and/or the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These deficits could be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due to economic conditions or closures, additional contract purchases, and/or the addition of new generating resources. The loads and resources analysis …
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004

Description: This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Acoustic Detecting and Locating Gas Pipe Line Infringement: Final Contract Report

Description: The extensive network of high-pressure natural gas transmission pipelines covering the United States provides an important infrastructure for our energy independence. Early detection of pipeline leaks and infringements by construction equipment, resulting in corrosion fractures, presents an important aspect of our national security policy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCVG) is and has been funding research on various applicable techniques. The WVU research team has focused on monitoring pipeline background acoustic signals generated and transmitted by gas flowing through the gas inside the pipeline. In case of a pipeline infringement, any mechanical impact on the pipe wall, or escape of high-pressure gas, generates acoustic signals traveling both up and down stream through the gas. Sudden changes in flow noise are detectable with a Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP), developed under this contract. It incorporates a pressure compensating microphone and a signal- recording device. Direct access to the gas inside the line is obtained by mounting such a PAMP, with a 1/2 inch NPT connection, to a pipeline pressure port found near most shut-off valves. An FFT of the recorded signal subtracted by that of the background noise recorded one-second earlier appears to sufficiently isolate the infringement signal to allow source interpretation. Using cell phones for data downloading might allow a network of such 1000-psi rated PAMP's to acoustically monitor a pipeline system and be trained by neural network software to positively identify and locate any pipeline infringement.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Loth, John L.; Morris, Gary J.; Palmer, George M.; Guiler, Richard & Browning, Patrick
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ACRF Data Collection and Processing Infrastructure

Description: We present a description of the data flow from measurement to long-term archive. We also discuss data communications infrastructure. The data handling processes presented include collection, transfer, ingest, quality control, creation of Value-Added Products (VAP), and data archiving.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Macduff, M. & Egan, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.

Description: This report (1) summarizes the overall design of the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) system to include detailed descriptions of system components, (2) describes the work accomplished throughout FY04 to evaluate the current health of the original prototype and to return it to operation, (3) describes the status of the AES and the AES project as of September 2004, and (4) details activities planned to complete modernization of the system to include development and testing of the second-generation AES prototype.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Ashby, M. Rodema
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

APPSPACK 4.0 : asynchronous parallel pattern search for derivative-free optimization.

Description: APPSPACK is software for solving unconstrained and bound constrained optimization problems. It implements an asynchronous parallel pattern search method that has been specifically designed for problems characterized by expensive function evaluations. Using APPSPACK to solve optimization problems has several advantages: No derivative information is needed; the procedure for evaluating the objective function can be executed via a separate program or script; the code can be run in serial or parallel, regardless of whether or not the function evaluation itself is parallel; and the software is freely available. We describe the underlying algorithm, data structures, and features of APPSPACK version 4.0 as well as how to use and customize the software.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Gray, Genetha Anne & Kolda, Tamara Gibson
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Aqueous Thermodynamics and Complexation Reactions of Anionic Silica and Uranium Species to High Concentration

Description: The objective of this research project is to develop the necessary thermodynamic data, including aqueous phase stability constants and Pitzer ion-interaction parameters, to predict the changes in the aqueous phase chemistry that occur when high ionic strength, highly basic tank wastes enter the vadose zone.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Choppin, Gregory R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Arsenic in water treatment.

Description: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is collaborating with the Awwa Research Foundation (AwwaRF) and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development) in a program for the development and testing of innovative technologies that have the potential to substantially reduce the costs associated with arsenic removal from drinking water. Sandia National Laboratories will administer contracts placed with AwwaRF and WERC to carry out bench scale studies and economic analyses/outreach activities, respectively. The elements of the AwwaRF program include (1) identification of new technologies, (2) proof-of-concept laboratory studies and, (3) a research program that will meet the other needs of small utilities by providing solutions to small utilities so that they may successfully meet the new arsenic MCL. WERC's activities will include development of an economic analysis tool for Pilot Scale Demonstrations and development of educational training and technical assistance tools. The objective of the Sandia Program is the field demonstration testing of innovative technologies. The primary deliverables of the Sandia program will be engineering analyses of candidate technologies; these will be contained in preliminary reports and final analysis reports. Projected scale-up costs will be generated using a cost model provided by WERC or another suitable model.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Siegel, Malcolm Dean
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Atmospheric Aerosol Source-Receptor Relationships: The Role of Coal-Fired Power Plants

Description: This report describes the technical progress made on the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) during the period of March 2004 through August 2004. Significant progress was made this project period on the analysis of ambient data, source apportionment, and deterministic modeling activities. Results highlighted in this report include evaluation of the performance of PMCAMx+ for an air pollution episode in the Eastern US, an emission profile for a coke production facility, ultrafine particle composition during a nucleation event, and a new hybrid approach for source apportionment. An agreement was reached with a utility to characterize fine particle and mercury emissions from a commercial coal fired power. Research in the next project period will include source testing of a coal fired power plant, source apportionment analysis, emission scenario modeling with PMCAMx+, and writing up results for submission as journal articles.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Robinson, Allen L.; Pandis, Spyros N. & Davidson, Cliff I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Avian Fact Sheet

Description: OAK-B135 After conducting four national research meetings, producing a document guiding research: Metrics and Methods for Determining or Monitoring Potential Impacts on Birds at Existing and Proposed Wind Energy Sites, 1999, and another paper, Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States, 2001, the subcommittee recognized a need to summarize in a short fact sheet what is known about avian-wind interaction and what questions remain. This fact sheet attempts to summarize in lay terms the result of extensive discussion about avian-wind interaction on land. This fact sheet does not address research conducted on offshore development. This fact sheet is not intended as a conclusion on the subject; rather, it is a summary as of Fall/Winter 2002.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Group, NWCC Wildlife Work
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Booster 6-GeV study

Description: Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; /Fermilab et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Bounding Estimate for the 'Hot' Channel Temperature and Preliminary Calculation of Mixing in the Lower Plenum for the NGNP Point Design Using CFD

Description: The power density in the core of the block next generation nuclear power plant (NGNP) will not be uniform due to geometry, core layout and fuel pin design. Recent calculations performed to optimize the core design indicate that the maximum radial variation will be 1.25 times the average. This significant radial variation in the local power density will create a variation in the temperature of the helium coolant as it cools the core. The coolant channel with the highest outlet temperature is referred to as the ‘hot’ channel. The concern is that the high temperature channels, which exit into the lower plenum as jets, called ‘hot streaking,’ will adversely affect materials in the lower plenum, the exit duct and the turbine, as well as affect the performance of the turbine. The objective of the present study is to determine or bound the maximum exit temperature of the ‘hot’ channel. The maximum hot channel temperature depends on the total coolant flow rate, which has not yet been fixed. Experiments need to be designed to capture the complex physics of the lower-plenum flow to allow assessment and validation of numerical simulations. While preliminary CFD simulations are not yet validated, they can be of use in the planning of the experiments, particularly in estimating where there are regions of high and low turbulence intensity. Mixing of the coolant is related to the turbulence intensity as well as to the overall nature of the mean flow. The purpose of the present task is to provide preliminary flow calculations of the coolant in the lower plenum to examine flow patterns and turbulence intensity.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Johnson, Richard W. & Schultz, R. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Bunching for shorter damping rings for the ILC

Description: A variant rearrangement of the bunch trains for the ILC that enables much shorter damping rings is presented. In a particular example the {approx}2280 bunches are regrouped into {approx}450 subtrains of five adjacent bunches. These subtrains are extracted from the damping rings at {approx}2.2 {micro}s intervals, obtaining the 1ms macrobunch length of the baseline TESLA collider scenario. If the baseline damping rf frequency is 325 MHz and the kicker rise and fall times are {approx}20 ns, a ring circumference of {approx}4.5km is required. Variations of the scheme could easily reduce the circumference to {approx}3km, and faster kickers could reduce it even further.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Neuffer, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Calculating efficiencies and their uncertainties

Description: The commonly used methods for the calculation of the statistical uncertainties in cut efficiencies (''Poisson'' and ''binomial'' errors) are both defective, as is seen in extreme cases. A method for the calculation of uncertainties based upon Bayes' Theorem is presented; this method has no problem with extreme cases. A program for the calculation of such uncertainties is also available.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Paterno, Marc
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

Description: This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl-methyl)phosphonate (CBMP) internucleotide group. Unmodified phosphodiester linkages were formed using a standard {beta}-cyanoethyl cycle and automated DNA synthesizer. Modified CBMP internucleotide linkage was produced using the …
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Schinazi, Raymond F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

Description: The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Characterization of a new class of surface micromachined pumps.

Description: This is the latest in a series of LDRD's that we have been conducting with Florida State University/Florida A&M University (FSU/FAMU) under the campus executive program. This research builds on the earlier projects; ''Development of Highly Integrated Magnetically and Electrostatically Actuated Micropumps'' (SAND2003-4674) and ''Development of Magnetically and Electrostatically Driven Surface Micromachined Pumps'' (SAND2002-0704P). In this year's LDRD we designed 2nd generation of surface micromachined (SMM) gear and viscous pumps. Two SUMMiT{trademark} modules full of design variations of these pumps were fabricated and one SwIFT{trademark} module is still in fabrication. The SwIFT{trademark} fabrication process results in a transparent pump housing cover that will enable visualization inside the pumps. Since the SwIFT{trademark} pumps have not been tested as they are still in fabrication, this report will focus on the 2nd generation SUMMiT{trademark} designs. Pump testing (pressure vs. flow) was conducted on several of the SUMMiT{trademark} designs resulting in the first pump curve for this class of SMM pumps. A pump curve was generated for the higher torque 2nd generation gear pump designed by Jason Hendrix of FSU. The pump maximum flow rate at zero head was 6.5 nl/s for a 30V, 30 Hz square wave signal. This level of flow rate would be more than adequate for our typical SMM SUMMiT{trademark} or SwIFT{trademark} channels which have typical volumes on the order of 50 pl.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Galambos, Paul C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

Description: The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can …
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Frantz, J. H., Jr.; Brown, K. G.; Sawyer, W. K.; Zyglowicz, P. A.; Halleck, P. M. & Spivey, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desoprtion Processes and Model Upscaling

Description: In order to apply predictive reactive transport models to the Hanford site, detailed knowledge of the speciation of contaminants is required. Important speciation parameters include: (1) oxidation state; (2) the local molecular structure surrounding contaminant elements; (3) the type and binding of a contaminant ion sorption complex (if adsorbed); (4) the type(s) of phase within which a contaminant is structurally incorporated [e.g., present in a three-dimensional precipitate(s)]; (5) the phase associations of a contaminant; (6) the microscopic distribution of a contaminant within sediments and soils. In the present study, we have used synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopic methods to study the speciation of U and Cu in contaminated soil and sediment samples from the Hanford Site. To complement and complete our initial XAFS investigation of U speciation in contaminated vadose zone sediments below tank BX-102, we have also performed mXRD studies of two sediment sample to identify the specific U(VI)-silicate phase present. Samples from the 300 Area were examined by mSXRF to determine the microscopic distribution and element associations of Cu and U. These samples were also analyzed by U LIII- and Cu K-edge XAFS spectroscopy to determine the chemical speciation of these elements.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Ball, William P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Children in Poverty: Profile, Trends, and Issues

Description: This report documents the trends of economic well-being of children, giving data on child poverty and the employment rate of their mothers.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Burke, Vee; Gabe, Tom & Falk, Gene
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Climate change effects on international stability : a white paper.

Description: This white paper represents a summary of work intended to lay the foundation for development of a climatological/agent model of climate-induced conflict. The paper combines several loosely-coupled efforts and is the final report for a four-month late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project funded by the Advanced Concepts Group (ACG). The project involved contributions by many participants having diverse areas of expertise, with the common goal of learning how to tie together the physical and human causes and consequences of climate change. We performed a review of relevant literature on conflict arising from environmental scarcity. Rather than simply reviewing the previous work, we actively collected data from the referenced sources, reproduced some of the work, and explored alternative models. We used the unfolding crisis in Darfur (western Sudan) as a case study of conflict related to or triggered by climate change, and as an exercise for developing a preliminary concept map. We also outlined a plan for implementing agents in a climate model and defined a logical progression toward the ultimate goal of running both types of models simultaneously in a two-way feedback mode, where the behavior of agents influences the climate and climate change affects the agents. Finally, we offer some ''lessons learned'' in attempting to keep a diverse and geographically dispersed group working together by using Web-based collaborative tools.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Murphy, Kathryn; Taylor, Mark A.; Fujii, Joy; Malczynski, Leonard A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Reinert, Rhonda K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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