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1-10 Mbar Laser-Driven Shocks Using the Janus Laser Facility

Description: We report preliminary results using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Janus laser facility to generate high pressure laser-driven shocks in the 1-10 Mbar regime. These experiments address various issues, including shock steadiness, planarity, uniformity and low target preheat, important for making precision EOS measurements on a small (E < 250 J) laser facility. A brief description of the experimental techniques, target design and measurements will be given.
Date: August 10, 2001
Creator: Dunn, J.; Price, D. F.; Moon, S. J.; Cauble, R. C.; Springer, P. T. & Ng, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with capability for super bunch beams

Description: A 60 TeV center of mass hadron collider is proposed, which has capability of using Superbunch beam. With Superbunch beam, the luminosity is expected to be increased by a factor of 20, compared with conventional acceleration using RF cavities. This hadron collider will be built in two stages with a low field magnet ring first and a high field magnet ring later in the same tunnel. The low field magnet rig will be built with Pipetron scheme, with 7 TeV and 7 TeV proton beams, making a 14 TeV center of mass energy high luminosity collider, using Superbunch beams. In the second stage 10 Tesla high field magnets with twin beams, will be installed. It also utilizes Superbunch beams, realizing high luminosity collider. To accelerate Superbunch beams, the barrier bucket and acceleration induction cells will be used, which are made of induction cells, utilizing FINEMET material. The core loss of the FINEMET is estimated for the whole collider is estimated. The synchrotron radiation of the collider is also estimated. Merits of Superbunch beams over RF bunched beams for the high energy experiments is described.
Date: August 22, 2001
Creator: Takayama, Ryuji Yamada and Ken
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

80 HP PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYST SYSTEM

Description: The US economy is linked to efficient heavy vehicle transportation and diesel remains the fuel of choice for mass transportation of goods and services. Diesel engines remain the most reliable and cost effective system for commerce. Recent deleterious effects of diesel exhaust on health and environment have led to an urgent need for cost effective technologies that would bring about reduction in NOx and PM. CARB estimates on-road diesel mobile source will contribute almost 50% NOx and 78% PM emissions by 2010. As a result recent Federal and State mandates have been adopted to reduce emissions from diesel exhaust to 1 Gm/bhp.-Hr of NOx and 0.05 Gm/bhp-hr of PM by the year 2007. The 2007 standard is to be achieved in a stepwise manner starting with the standards for 2002 namely 2 Gm/bhp-hr NOx and 0.1 Gm/bhp-hr of PM. 2002 standards are likely to be met by most engine manufacturer by some modified form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system or by employing a sophisticated engine control system. Importance of cost effective technology requirement is further exaggerated by the fact that in recent years diesel engine production have increased dramatically see figure 1 and has out stripped the gasoline engine production almost 4:1 see figure 2. Currently gasoline engine employs a 3-way catalytic system for NOx and HC reduction and in order for the 3-way system to work the engine is run near stoichiometric air : fuel ratio so that exhaust has virtually no oxygen. This strategy has resulted in a poorer efficiency and hence less efficient utilization of our natural resources. By contrast diesel engine operate on a lean burn principals i.e. air rich and currently there are no commercial technologies available for treating NOx and PM. Technologies being considered for reducing NOx from lean burn (diesel) exhaust are; …
Date: August 5, 2001
Creator: Slone, Ralph
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

11th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes, Extended Abstracts and Papers, 19-22 August 2001, Estes Park, Colorado

Description: The 11th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields. Discussions will include the various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon--their properties, the dynamics during device processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Sessions and panel discussions will review impurities and defects in crystalline-silicon PV, advanced cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and future manufacturing demands. The workshop will emphasize some of the promising new technologies in Si solar cell fabrication that can lower PV energy costs and meet the throughput demands of the future. The three-day workshop will consist of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. Topics to be discussed are: Si Mechanical properties and Wafer Handling, Advanced Topics in PV Fundamentals, Gettering and Passivation, Impurities and Defects, Advanced Emitters, Crystalline Silicon Growth, and Solar Cell Processing. The workshop will also include presentations by NREL subcontractors who will review the highlights of their research during the current subcontract period. In addition, there will be two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results. Some presentations will address recent technologies in the microelectronics field that may have a direct bearing on PV.
Date: August 16, 2001
Creator: Sopori, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2000 Census: Review of Partnership Program Highlights Best Practices for Future Operations

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "To take a more complete and accurate count of the nation's population in the 2000 Census, the Bureau of the Census partnered with other federal agencies, as well as with state, local, and tribal governments; religious, community, and social service organizations; and private businesses. According to the Bureau, about 140,000 organizations participated in the partnership program by assisting in such critical activities as reviewing and updating the Bureau's address list, encouraging people--especially hard-to-count populations--to participate in the census, and recruiting temporary census employees. GAO found that the Bureau spent about $142.9 million on its partnership program, or about two percent of the estimated $6.5 billion the Bureau allocated for the census and an average of about $1.19 for each of the 120 million households that the Bureau estimates are in the nation. The Bureau staffed the partnership program with 594 full-time positions, of which 560 were allocated to the field, while the remaining slots were located in the Bureau's headquarters. Decisions on which organizations to partner with and what events to attend were governed by unwritten guidelines and criteria and were driven by the Bureau's desire to collaborate with virtually any organization that would support the census. The Bureau made the census logo available on its Internet site and encouraged partners to use the logo to help promote the census. However, the Bureau did not have any written guidance on how partners could characterize their association with the Bureau or what constituted appropriate use of the census logo. The Bureau has since prepared written guidelines for making decisions on partnership engagements. However, the guidelines fall short in that they still do not address how partners may (1) characterize their associations with the Bureau and (2) use …
Date: August 20, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2001 Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology [sic], Metabolism. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list]

Description: The Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism [and Molecular Biology] was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, New Hampshire, August 5-10, 2001. The conference was attended by 135 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Ecology and genetic elements; Genomics and evolution; Ecology, genomes and gene regulation; Replication and recombination; Chromatin and transcription; Gene regulation; Post-transcription processing; Biochemistry and metabolism; Proteomics and protein structure; Metabolism and physiology. The featured speaker addressed the topic: ''Archaeal viruses, witnesses of prebiotic evolution?''
Date: August 10, 2001
Creator: Daniels, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2001 Gordon Research Conference on Quantum Control of Light and Matter. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list]

Description: The Gordon Research Conference on Quantum Control of Light and Matter [Quantum Control of Atomic and Molecular Motion] was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, July 29 - August 3, 2001. The conference was attended by 119 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: General perspectives, Phase control, Optimal control, Quantum information, Light manipulation and manipulation with light, Control in the condensed phase, Strong field control, Laser cooling and Bose-Einstein Condensate dynamics, and Control in the solid phase.
Date: August 3, 2001
Creator: Shapiro, Moshe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User's Conference Proceedings (CD)

Description: The 2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User Conference provided an opportunity for engineers in the automotive industry and the research environment to share their experiences in vehicle systems modeling using ADVISOR and PSAT. ADVISOR and PSAT are vehicle systems modeling tools developed and supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory respectively with the financial support of the US Department of Energy. During this conference peers presented the results of studies using the simulation tools and improvements that they have made or would like to see in the simulation tools. Focus areas of the presentations included Control Strategy, Model Validation, Optimization and Co-Simulation, Model Development, Applications, and Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis. Attendees were offered the opportunity to give feedback on future model development plans.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Markel, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

D. A. Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning: Implications for the Development of Music Theory Instructional Material

Description: This research project evaluates the effectiveness of specific music theory instructional strategies in terms of D. A. Kolb’s theory of experiential learning and Kolb’s typology of individual learning style. The project provides an original methodology for the adaptation of music theory instructional material to the individual learning style types described in Kolb’s typology. The study compares the relative effectiveness of two music theory instructional sequences, one of which is adapted for all of the learning style modalities described in Kolb’s typology, and the other adapted for only a limited number of Kolb’s learning style types. In order to compare the potential “learning outcomes” produced by these instructional sequences, a detailed study is proposed, in which computer based instruction (CBI) will deliver the instructional sequences to research participants and electronically record the participants’ responses. The current study demonstrates the effective aspects of the original methodology and suggests methods for the successful adaptation of music theory instructional material to individual student learning styles.
Date: August 2001
Creator: Lively, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Abstraction of Models for Pitting and Crevice Corrosion of Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

Description: This analyses and models report (AMR) was conducted in response to written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999a). ICN 01 of this AMR was developed following guidelines provided in TWP-MGR-MD-000004 REV 01, ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001, Addendum B). The purpose and scope of this AMR is to review and analyze upstream process-level models (CRWMS M and O 2000a and CRWMS M and O 2000b) and information relevant to pitting and crevice corrosion degradation of waste package outer barrier (Alloy 22) and drip shield (Titanium Grade 7) materials, and to develop abstractions of the important processes in a form that is suitable for input to the WAPDEG analysis for long-term degradation of waste package outer barrier and drip shield in the repository. The abstraction is developed in a manner that ensures consistency with the process-level models and information and captures the essential behavior of the processes represented. Also considered in the model abstraction are the probably range of exposure conditions in emplacement drifts and local exposure conditions on drip shield and waste package surfaces. The approach, method, and assumptions that are employed in the model abstraction are documented and justified.
Date: August 29, 2001
Creator: Mon, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands

Description: During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is …
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Leisvik, M & Hamilton, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Accidental Contamination of Samples Used in Canadian Lynx Study Rendered the Study's Preliminary Conclusion Invalid

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This report discusses the validity of the results of a 1998 study of the Canadian lynx. The Forest Service contracted with Dr. John Weaver of the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York City to help survey the Canadian lynx in the Cascade Mountains of Washington and Oregon. In a March 1999 interim report, Dr. Weaver concluded that the Canadian lynx lives in some forests in Washington and Oregon. In March 2000, the Fish and Wildlife Service placed the lynx on its list of threatened species in the forested portions of 13 states, including Washington and Oregon. Issues have since been raised about whether the study's results were falsified. GAO found no evidence that the study was deliberately falsified."
Date: August 14, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Accounting Data to Web Interface Using PERL

Description: This document will explain the process to create a web interface for the accounting information generated by the High Performance Storage Systems (HPSS) accounting report feature. The accounting report contains useful data but it is not easily accessed in a meaningful way. The accounting report is the only way to see summarized storage usage information. The first step is to take the accounting data, make it meaningful and store the modified data in persistent databases. The second step is to generate the various user interfaces, HTML pages, that will be used to access the data. The third step is to transfer all required files to the web server. The web pages pass parameters to Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts that generate dynamic web pages and graphs. The end result is a web page with specific information presented in text with or without graphs. The accounting report has a specific format that allows the use of regular expressions to verify if a line is storage data. Each storage data line is stored in a detailed database file with a name that includes the run date. The detailed database is used to create a summarized database file that also uses run date in its name. The summarized database is used to create the group.html web page that includes a list of all storage users. Scripts that query the database folder to build a list of available databases generate two additional web pages. A master script that is run monthly as part of a cron job, after the accounting report has completed, manages all of these individual scripts. All scripts are written in the PERL programming language. Whenever possible data manipulation scripts are written as filters. All scripts are written to be single source, which means they will function properly on both the …
Date: August 13, 2001
Creator: Hargeaves, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Addressing the Axial Burnup Distribution in PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety

Description: This paper summarizes efforts related to developing a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial burnup distribution in PWR burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The paper reviews available data on the axial variation in burnup and the effect of axial burnup profiles on reactivity in a SNF cask. A publicly available database of profiles is examined to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for general PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. For this assessment, a statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial burnup profile database was performed that identifies the most reactive profiles as statistical outliers that are not representative of typical discharged SNF assemblies. The impact of these bounding profiles on the neutron multiplication factor for a high-density burnup credit cask is quantified. Finally, analyses are presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of assemblies with axial profiles that are not bounded by the existing database. The paper concludes with findings for addressing the axial burnup distribution in burnup credit analyses.
Date: August 2, 2001
Creator: Wagner, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

Description: The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).
Date: August 2001
Creator: Howitt, J.; Anderson, C. W. & Freimuth, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING FOR VOLUMETRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA

Description: Computed tomography (CT) has long been used by industry as a non-destructive evaluation technique for discovering flaws in parts before their use. Traditional linear array computed tomography systems acquired data at a rate that could be reconstructed simultaneously with data acquisition. With new area detectors, the data rate of acquisition has increased exponentially, and the reconstruction algorithm does not scale linearly with increased data. FlashCT DPS (Flat Panel Amorphous Silicon High Resolution Computed Tomography, Data Processing System) is a software package developed by M. Sheats, and A. Davis at LANL to meet the data processing demands of new flat panel array computed tomography. FlashCT--DPS combines several features unique to industrial computed tomography systems. It addresses traditional usability problems by providing an intuitive graphical user interface and powerful analysis tools. It includes the three major CT reconstruction algorithms: parallel backprojection, fan beam resorting, and Feldkamp cone beam. It also provides visualization tools for examination of data after processing. Finally, it is able to perform distributed data reconstruction with a near linear speed increase as a function of the number of processors used. Additionally, utility programs have been developed to support project editing and computing cluster management for the FlashCT system. FlashCT--DPS runs on a standard PC platform and operates well on a variety of processor and memory configurations.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: BERKELEY, M. SHEATS - UC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED DIRECT LIQUEFACTION CONCEPTS FOR PETC GENERIC UNITS

Description: The results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments and supporting technical and economic assessments conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91040 are reported for the period April 1, 2001 to June 30 2001. This work involves the introduction into the basic two-stage liquefaction process several novel concepts, which include dispersed lower-cost catalysts, coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. This project has been modified to include an investigation into the production of value added materials from coal using low-severity liquefaction based technologies.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Berkovich, Adam J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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