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Deposit Summary

Description: Deposit summary of $35.00 made on August 9, 2001.
Date: August 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $454.75 reconciled for the period ending on July 31, 2001.
Date: August 8, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Accounting Data to Web Interface Using PERL

Description: This document will explain the process to create a web interface for the accounting information generated by the High Performance Storage Systems (HPSS) accounting report feature. The accounting report contains useful data but it is not easily accessed in a meaningful way. The accounting report is the only way to see summarized storage usage information. The first step is to take the accounting data, make it meaningful and store the modified data in persistent databases. The second step is to generate the various user interfaces, HTML pages, that will be used to access the data. The third step is to transfer all required files to the web server. The web pages pass parameters to Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts that generate dynamic web pages and graphs. The end result is a web page with specific information presented in text with or without graphs. The accounting report has a specific format that allows the use of regular expressions to verify if a line is storage data. Each storage data line is stored in a detailed database file with a name that includes the run date. The detailed database is used to create a summarized database file that also uses run date in its name. The summarized database is used to create the group.html web page that includes a list of all storage users. Scripts that query the database folder to build a list of available databases generate two additional web pages. A master script that is run monthly as part of a cron job, after the accounting report has completed, manages all of these individual scripts. All scripts are written in the PERL programming language. Whenever possible data manipulation scripts are written as filters. All scripts are written to be single source, which means they will function properly on both the …
Date: August 13, 2001
Creator: Hargeaves, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis of Fabry-Perot Velocimeter Records

Description: Program demonstration and user instructions are presented for FabryVB5. This computer program was created for use in analyzing Fabry-Perot interferometer records that detail the velocity time histories of fast moving surfaces. Graphical curves representing peak fringe positions and fiducial timing dots are extracted from a digitized film record or from a CCD digital image. An analysis is demonstrated on a sample velocimeter record along with some mathematical formula and routine operations. Routines used to analyze calibration records on streak camera distortions are illustrated in an appendix. This is a Microsoft Visual Basic{trademark} version for the PC.
Date: August 3, 2001
Creator: Avara, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ERA-40 SST and Sea Ice Concentration Data

Description: The lower boundary condition of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice concentration (sic) is a critical forcing of the lower frequencies in multi-decadal global atmospheric reanalyses such as ERA-40. Partly in response to the ERA-40 project, new SST/sic data sets have been developed that are considerably improved over those available to the first-generation reanalyses. This paper documents the input SST/sic data sets and the processing that created the daily SST/sic specification for the ERA-40 period 1956-2001. The source data are: (1) the monthly mean HadISST data set from the UKMO Hadley Centre for 1956-1981; and (2) the weekly NCEP 2DVAR data for 1982-present. Both data sets are reanalyses of satellite and conventional SST/sic observations. The principal reason for the higher quality of these source data sets is the use of a common consensus sic and a common sic-SST relationship in the sea ice margins. The use of a common sic resulted in a very smooth transition between HadISST and NCEP 2DVAR, despite differences in data assimilation techniques and monthly versus weekly analyses. No special action was required to insure consistency at the transition unlike as was necessary for the AMIP II experiment (Fiorino, 1997). The only special processing was application of the AMIP II mid-month calculation (Taylor et al., 2000) for the interpolation of monthly mean data to daily values. This scheme insures that the monthly mean of the daily-interpolated data is nearly identical to the input monthly mean. Detailed comparisons of the SST and sic during the HadISST-NCEP transition, and other long time series, are given. We also compare the NCEP 2DVAR (circa 2000) to a newer version of the OISST (V2, circa 2001) and demonstrate that the small differences should have no impact on the ERA-40 atmosphere reanalyses.
Date: August 27, 2001
Creator: Fiorino, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Mechanical Engineering Safety Note PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly

Description: The PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly consists of a spreader bar that will be attached to the PEPC Cell Housing or the Midplane Transportation Fixture during operation. While in use in the OAB (Optics Assembly Building), the Spreader Bar Assembly will be manipulated by the NOID (New Optics Insertion Device). The other critical components of the assembly are the three angular contact bearing swivels that attach the spreader bar to the lifting mechanism and the corner clamps which are used to capture the Cell Housing.
Date: August 26, 2001
Creator: Mason, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Theoretical Model for the EM Effects Induced by High-Energy Photons (Gamma, X-ray) in Dielectric Materials and Electronic Systems

Description: During last twenty years, a number of models have been used to calculate the change of conductivity and dielectric strength in materials caused by the passage of high-energy photons, such as Gamma-rays and X-rays. In these models, the electromagnetic fields generated in the electronic system created by the high-energy photons have not been investigated. That is, the solution of Maxwell's equations has not been obtained for these kinds of problems. We constructed a theoretical model, described by a set of equations to solve such a problem. The model includes the equations that describe the physics of the recombination and generation of electron-hole pairs by the high-energy photons in the dielectric materials, the Compton electron generation rates, and Maxwell's equations. When a beam of gamma photons penetrates into a transmission line or cables, energetic electrons and holes (carriers) are created in the metals and dielectrics of the system by the Compton and photoelectric effects. These energetic electrons and holes in turn create many low-energy holes and electrons through the interaction of the high-energy electrons with the atoms in the solids. Since the density of the solids is very high, the mean free path of the high-energy electrons is very short. In other words, they lose their energy in a very short-time, on the order of picoseconds or less. Since electronic systems typically do not respond in such a short time, we can make the approximation that the number of low-energy carriers can be determined by energy deposition by the gamma photons with the use of a Monte Carlo code and then divide the deposited energy by the average amount of energy necessary to create an electron-hole pair. Then in order to investigate how the electromagnetic wave is created by the gamma photons and its behavior as it propagates through the electronic …
Date: August 3, 2001
Creator: Yee, J H; Mayhall, D J & Bland, M F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Almost Optimal Interior Penalty Discontinuous Approximations of Symmetric Elliptic Problems on Non-Matching Grids

Description: We consider an interior penalty discontinuous approximation for symmetric elliptic problems of second order on non-matching grids in this paper. The main result is an almost optimal error estimate for the interior penalty approximation of the original problem based on the partition of the domain into a finite number of subdomains. Further, an error analysis for the finite element approximation of the penalty formulation is given. Finally, numerical experiments on a series of model second order problems are presented.
Date: August 8, 2001
Creator: Lazarov, R D; Pasciak, J E; Schoberl, J & Vassilevski, P S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Liquid Scoping Study for Tritium-Lean, Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plants

Description: In a thick-liquid protected chamber design, such as HYLIFE-II, a molten-salt is used to attenuate neutrons and protect the chamber structures from radiation damage. The molten-salt absorbs some of the material and energy given off by the target explosion. In the case of a fast ignition inertial fusion system, advanced targets have been proposed that may be Self-sufficient in the tritium breeding (i.e., the amount of tritium bred in target exceeds the amount burned). These ''tritium-lean'' targets contain approximately 0.5% tritium and 99.5% deuterium, but require a large pr of 10-20 g/cm{sup 2}. Although most of the yield is provided by D-T reactions, the majority of fusion reactions are D-D, which produces a net surplus of tritium. This aspect allows for greater freedom when selecting a liquid for the protective blanket (lithium-bearing compounds are not required). This study assesses characteristics of many single, binary, and ternary molten-salts. Using the NIST Properties of Molten Salts Database, approximately 4300 molten-salts were included in the study [1]. As an initial screening, salts were evaluated for their safety and environmental (S&E) characteristics, which included an assessment of waste disposal rating, contact dose, and radioactive afterheat. Salts that passed the S&E criteria were then evaluated for neutron shielding ability and pumping power. The pumping power was calculated using three components: velocity head losses, frictional losses, and lift. This assessment left us with 57 molten-salts to recommend for further analysis. Many of these molten-salts contain elements such as sodium, lithium, beryllium, boron, fluorine, and oxygen. Recommendations for further analysis are also made.
Date: August 14, 2001
Creator: Schmitt, R. C.; Latkowski, J. F.; Durbin, S. G.; Meier, W. R. & Reyes, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Marangoni Convection Induced Ripple on Grazing Incidence Liquid Metal Mirror (GILMM) Used for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy

Description: A spatial variation of temperature in the sodium film on the surface of the grazing incidence liquid metal mirror (GILMM) will give rise to convection due to the temperature dependent variation in surface tension. This is called thermal capillary convection or the Marangoni effect and causes the surface to have ripples or waves. This note estimates the magnitude of this effect and finds, with care, design parameters can be chosen to make the resulting ripples sufficiently small so that a laser beam can be focused on a target of 1/4 mm spot size at 30 m distance, for example. Smaller spot sizes are discussed.
Date: August 27, 2001
Creator: Moir, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Partial Re-vegetation of the Dust and Blowing-Sand Source Area: A proposal for use of a 175 K$ SEP Fine

Description: We propose using the 175 K$ SEP money to stabilize approximately 300-340 acres located to the southwest of the 200 West Expansion Area fence. We propose a procedure that relies on drill seeding a mixture of perennial native grasses followed by truck application of a soil fixative such as Soil Master. This effort would compliment FDH/Duratek activities planned for inside the 200 West fence lines. Assuming that both efforts are successful, the result would be between 2,000 and 2,500 meters of stabilized soil surface upwind of the primary receptors at MO-281/272-WA, which would result in a significant reduction in respirable dust at the receptor site.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Becker, James M. & Sackschewsky, Michael R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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LLNL PuPS Weld Qualification Plan

Description: This plan ensures the quality of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) DOE 3013 Standard Plutonium Packaging System (PuPS) can welds meet the requirements stipulated in the DOE Standard 3013-00 ''Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials'' (Reference 1) and G-ESR-G-00035, Revision 1 dated July 26, 2000, ''Savannah River Site Stabilization and Packaging Requirements for Plutonium Bearing Materials for Storage.'' (Reference 2) This plan also meets the requirements for a weld qualification plan as stipulated in the G-ESR-G-00035. The Outer Can weld must meet ASME VIII & IX. The Outer Can welds will be evaluated initially and during production. The initial evaluation will be done by performing the following: ASME IX welding procedure qualification, ASME IX operator qualification, and a 25 can Dummy Outer Can (DOC) verification run. During production, product cans and DOCs will be evaluated. Product cans will be evaluated by a combination of visual examination of the weld faces and the use of helium leak checking. The DOCs will be examined by visual examination, leak check, radiographic examination and metallographic examination. Appendix 2 summarizes the requirements of each of these evaluations. The Inner Can weld must meet the leak tightness requirements of DOE 3013. The Inner Can weld, while not required to meet ASME requirements, will be controlled as described in this plan to ensure a reliable leak path barrier and consistent production processing behavior. The product Inner Cans will be evaluated by a combination of visual examination of the weld faces and the use of helium leak checking.
Date: August 24, 2001
Creator: Dodson, K E & Riley, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ion Temperature Measurements in SSPX

Description: The Ion Doppler Spectrometer instrument on the Sustained Spheromak Physics experiment is described, along with background about it's operation. Results are presented from recent experimental runs, and the data is compared to the results of simple statistical models of heat exchange in two species gasses.
Date: August 24, 2001
Creator: Auerbach, D W; Hill, D N & McLean, H S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Isotopic Tracing of Fuel Components in Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS)

Description: Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope-ratio measurement technique developed in the late 1970s for tracing long-lived radioisotopes (e.g., {sup 14}C half life = 5760 y). The technique counts individual nuclei rather than waiting for their radioactive decay, allowing measurement of more than 100 low-level {sup 14}C samples per day (Vogel et al, 1995). The LLNL AMS system is shown in Fig.1. The contemporary quantity of {sup 14}C in living things ({sup 14}C/C = 1.2 x 10{sup -12} or 110 fmol {sup 14}C/ g C) is highly elevated compared to the quantity of {sup 14}C in petroleum-derived products. This isotopic elevation is sufficient to trace the fate of bio-derived fuel components in the emissions of an engine without the use of radioactive materials. If synthesis of a fuel component from biologically-derived source material is not feasible, another approach is to purchase {sup 14}C-labeled material (e.g., dibutyl maleate (DBM)) and dilute it with petroleum-derived material to yield a contemporary level of {sup 14}C. In each case, the virtual absence of {sup 14}C in petroleum based fuels gives a very low {sup 14}C background that makes this approach to tracing fuel components practical. Regulatory pressure to significantly reduce the particulate emissions from diesel engines is driving research into understanding mechanisms of soot formation. If mechanisms are understood, then combustion modeling can be used to evaluate possible changes in fuel formulation and suggest possible fuel components that can improve combustion and reduce PM emissions. The combustion paradigm assumes that large molecules break down into small components and then build up again during soot formation. AMS allows us to label specific fuel components, including oxygenates, trace the carbon atoms, and test this combustion modeling paradigm. Volatile and non-volatile organic fractions (VOF, NVOF) in the PM can be further separated. The VOF of the PM …
Date: August 2, 2001
Creator: Buchholz, Bruce A.; Mueller, Charles J. & Garbak, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Update of Environmental and Safety Analyses for the National Ignition Facility: Using a New Model to Track Target Material Usage

Description: The purpose of this paper is to report the methodology and assumptions, data, and results of calculations concerning safety and environmental issues related to excursions to currently planned NIF operations. Many possible uses of NIF have been suggested over the years. While some of these possible uses have been adopted into the baseline plans for NIF, many others have not. While we do not yet know all of the possible approved uses for NIF, one of the items that would bear on whether a certain course use might be adopted or not would be its environmental and safety impact. Here we examine certain excursions from the existing planned operations to determine their environmental and safety impacts. These excursions are related to the use of ''cocktail'' hohlraums as the baseline target for ignition experiments in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as well as possible increased utilization of beryllium and uranium. This paper also addresses the fission products produced from cocktail hohlraum use for high yield experiments. Again, this analyses does not imply an authorization to proceed with such modes of operation, or any intent to proceed beyond this analyses. A detailed analysis of a range of postulated experiments for NIF was conducted for the years 2003 through 2011. The goal was to quantify the amount of target material introduced into the target bay per year. The assumptions outlined in this paper are based on the worst-case scenario from an environmental perspective. A spreadsheet was developed to integrate all the gathered information and to calculate the total amount of materials per year. The spreadsheet was also designed as a tool for future analyses. The total amount of material was used to justify and establish a proposed upper bound for the amount of beryllium and uranium introduced into the target bay in a …
Date: August 3, 2001
Creator: Gillich, D; Tobin, M; Singh, M; Kalantar, D; Brereton, S & MacGowan, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analytical Solutions for Sequentially Reactive Transport with Different Retardation Factors

Description: Integral transforms have been widely used for deriving analytical solutions for solute transport systems. Often, analytical solutions can only be written in closed form in frequency domains and numerical inverse-transforms have to be involved to obtain semi-analytical solutions in the time domain. For this reason, previously published closed form solutions are restricted either to a small number of species or to the same retardation assumption. In this paper, we applied the solution scheme proposed by Bauer et al. in the time domain. Using available analytical solutions of a single species transport with first-order decay without coupling with its parent species concentration as fundamental solutions, a daughter species concentration can be expressed as a linear function of those fundamental solutions. The implementation of the solution scheme is straight forward and exact analytical solutions are derived for one- and three-dimensional transport systems.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Mansoor, K. & Lu, X.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Switchyard Enclosure Seismic Criteria Calculations

Description: Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was conducted on these four Beam Enclosure Assembly drawings: (1) AAA97-108954 (Quad); (2) AAA97-108981 (Quad Intermediate); (3) AAA98-101193 (Bundle); and (4) AAA97-108982 (Double Quad). Each drawing chosen represents one of the four enclosure types: Quad, Quad Intermediate, Bundle, and Double Quad. They were chosen because they have the longest length between supports for their type and are therefore the worse case condition from the standpoint of seismic induced stress. The purpose of the analysis was to find the maximum acceleration that each enclosure assembly can withstand and with this value determine the safety factor.
Date: August 27, 2001
Creator: Paton, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Some Examples of the Application and Validation of the NUFT Subsurface Flow and Transport Code

Description: This report was written as partial fulfillment of a subcontract from DOD/DOE Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) as part of a project directed by the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. The report documents examples of field validation of the Non-isothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) code for environmental remediation, with emphasis on soil vapor extraction, and describes some of the modifications needed to integrate the code into the DOD Groundwater Modeling System (GMS, 2000). Note that this report highlights only a subset of the full capabilities of the NUFT code.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Nitao, J J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Novel Concepts for Damage-Resistant Alloys in Next Generation Nuclear Power Systems Phase II Annual Report

Description: The discovery of a damage resistant alloy based on Hf solute additions is the highlight of the Phase II research. The damage resistance is supported by characterization of damage microstructures, measurement of radiation-induced grain boundary compositions and measurements of cracking in irradiated 316SS alloys with oversize solute additions. The addition of Hf reduced the impact of radiation for two processed conditions, a standard condition and a modified (optimized) condition. Pt additions reduced the impact of radiation on grain boundary segregation but did not reduce the impact on damage development or cracking. Because cracking susceptibility is associated with several material characteristics, separate effect experiments exploring strength effects using nonirradiated SSs were conducted. These crack growth tests suggest that irradiation strength by itself can promote environmental cracking. The novel concept of using oversized solutes to promote catalyzed defect recombination is a major thrust of this Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The successful demonstration of damage resistance in the modified Hf-doped alloy demonstrates promise in the concept for developing damage resistant alloys for future generation nuclear reactors. Differences between irradiation responses for Hf-doped and Pt-doped alloys suggest that the influence of the oversized elements depends on chemical reactivity in addition to solute size. Elimination of void formation to a dose of 50 dpa is a significant improvement in material performance. Strength effects on environmental cracking susceptibility were elucidated using cold-work variation in nonirradiated stainless steels. These results indicate that suppression of RIS alone will not assure that an alloy will be resistant to cracking.
Date: August 31, 2001
Creator: Bruemmer, Stephen M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Simonen, Edward P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Garner, Francis A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Edwards, Danny J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gan, Jian (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Andresen, Peter L. (General Electric Corporate Research and Development) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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What is Air? A Standard Model for Combustion Simulations

Description: Most combustion devices utilize air as the oxidizer. Thus, reactive flow simulations of these devices require the specification of the composition of air as part of the physicochemical input. A mixture of only oxygen and nitrogen often is used, although in reality air is a more complex mixture of somewhat variable composition. We summarize some useful parameters describing a standard model of dry air. Then we consider modifications to include water vapor for creating the desired level of humidity. The ''minor'' constituents of air, especially argon and water vapor, can affect the composition by as much as about 5 percent in the mole fractions.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Cloutman, L. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Mechanical Engineering Safety Note: Analysis and Control of Hazards Associated with NIF Capacitor Module Events

Description: The NIF capacitor module was reviewed with respect to pressure venting and shrapnel containment during failures. A modified module concept was proposed that would adequately vent the pressure, yet be effective at containing shrapnel. Two large vents are provided on each side of the module. These have fixed vent areas, and are immediately accessible for pressure venting at the beginning of a pressure transient. A shrapnel shield is located on the outside of each vent opening forming a chute. The chute contains a collimator. This increases the number of bounces that shrapnel must take on the way out, and directs the shrapnel to the trap beneath. The trap contains a depth of clear pine, sufficient to completely absorb the energy of even the most energetic fragment considered. Based on a review of the evidence from past capacitor failures at the FANTM facility at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, and additional theoretical estimates, the peak pressure generated in the module during explosive events was estimated to be less than 40 psig. This internal pressure in the FANTM module appears to be tolerable, as only minor damage to the module and to internal components was observed after events. The new module concept proposed here provides increased venting area, fully available at the initiation of an event. It is expected that even less damage would be observed if an event occurred in a module with this design. The module joints and connections were formally reviewed with respect to their tolerance to a brief internal pressure as high as 40 psig. With minor modifications that have been incorporated into the design, the module was shown to maintain its integrity during such events. Some of the calculations performed estimated the quantity of dielectric oil that could be involved in a capacitor failure. It was determined that …
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Brereton, S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Hydrodynamic Theory of Atomic Mixing in Multicomponent Gases and Plasmas

Description: Atomic mixing in multicomponent gases and plasmas is usually described as a diffusional process. The diffusional description is an approximation to a more general dynamical description in which the motion of each individual species or material is governed by its own momentum equation, with appropriate coupling terms to represent the exchange of momentum between different species. These equations are not new, but they are scattered in the literature. Here we summarize the form of these species momentum equations, and the coupling coefficients therein, in sufficient detail to facilitate their inclusion and use to simulate atomic mixing in hydrodynamics codes.
Date: August 22, 2001
Creator: Ramshaw, J D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Multi-Isotope (B, Sr, O, H, C) and Age Dating (3H-3He, 14C) Study of Ground Water From Salinas Valley, California: Hydrochemistry, Dynamics, and Contamination Processes

Description: The chemical and isotopic ({sup 11}B/{sup 10}B, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, {sup 2}H/H, {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C, {sup 14}C, {sup 3}He/{sup 3}H) compositions of groundwater from the upper aquifer system of the Salinas Valley in coastal central California were investigated in order to delineate the origin and processes of groundwater contamination in this complex system. The Salinas Valley has a relatively deep, confined ''400-foot'' aquifer, overlain by a ''180-foot'' aquifer, and a shallower perched aquifer, all made up of alluvial sand, gravel, and clay deposits. Groundwater from the aquifers have different {sup 14}C ages; fossil ({sup 14}C = 21.3 pmc) for the 400-foot, and modern ({sup 14}C = 72.2 to 98.2 pmc) for the 180-foot. Fresh groundwater in all aquifers is recharged naturally and artificially and through the Salinas River. The two modes of recharge can be distinguished chemically. We identified several different saline components with distinguishable chemical and isotopic fingerprints. (1) Salt-water intrusion in the northern basin has Cl concentrations up to 1700 mg/l, a Na/Cl ratio <sea water, a marine Br/Cl ratio, a Ca/Cl ratio >seawater, {delta}{sup 11}B between +17 and +38 per mil, and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between 0.7088 and 0.7096. Excess dissolved Ca, relative to the expected concentration for simple dilution of seawater, correlates with {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, suggesting base exchange reaction with clay minerals. (2) Agriculture return flow is high in NO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4}, with a {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr = 0.7082, {delta}{sup 11}B = 19 per mil; and {delta}{sup 13}C between -23 and -17 per mil. The {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He ages (5-17 years) and {sup 14}C data suggest vertical infiltration rates of irrigation water of 3 to 10 m/yr. (3) Non-marine saline water in the southern part of the valley has high TDS up to 3800 mg/l, high SO{sub 4}, Na/Cl …
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Vengosh, A; Gill, J; Davisson, M L & Hudson, B G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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