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Advanced Turbine Systems Program. Topical report

Description: The Allison Gas Turbine Division (Allison) of General Motors Corporation conducted the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program feasibility study (Phase I) in accordance with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s (METC`s) contract DE-AC21-86MC23165 A028. This feasibility study was to define and describe a natural gas-fired reference system which would meet the objective of {ge}60% overall efficiency, produce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions 10% less than the state-of-the-art without post combustion controls, and cost of electricity of the N{sup th} system to be approximately 10% below that of the current systems. In addition, the selected natural gas-fired reference system was expected to be adaptable to coal. The Allison proposed reference system feasibility study incorporated Allison`s long-term experience from advanced aerospace and military technology programs. This experience base is pertinent and crucial to the success of the ATS program. The existing aeroderivative technology base includes high temperature hot section design capability, single crystal technology, advanced cooling techniques, high temperature ceramics, ultrahigh turbomachinery components design, advanced cycles, and sophisticated computer codes.
Date: March 1, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1993

Description: The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and rock physical properties. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental dam acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. In this quarterly report technical progress is summarized for Task 3, data processing and analysis of: preliminary interpretation of interwell seismic data from wells 5-7 and 7-7 at the Gypsy Test Site; and the response of a thin layer in an anistropic shale.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1993

Description: The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and pore fluid permeability. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental data acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating unprecedented high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. Technical progress for the past quarter is summarized for Task 3, data processing and analysis of geological and petrophysical analysis of the interval from 800 to 1100 feet in five wells at the Gypsy Test Site.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Parra, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Porous Carbon Fibers and Related Materials

Description: A one-year subcontract sponsored by the Carbon Materials Technology Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the Department of Geological Sciences, University Of Tennessee, has been completed. A volumetric sorption system has been upgraded, in cooperation with commercial vendor, to allow the acquisition of data relevant to the program for the production of activated carbon molecular fiber sieves (ACFMS). The equipment and experimental techniques have been developed to determine the pore structure and porosity of reference materials and materials produced at ORNL as part of the development of methods for the activation of carbon fibers by various etching agents. Commercial activated coconut shell charcoal (ACSC) has been studied to verify instrument performance and to develop methodology for deducing cause and effects in the activation processes and to better understand the industrial processes (gas separation, natural gas storage, etc.). Operating personnel have been trained, standard operating procedures have been established, and quality assurance procedures have been developed and put in place. Carbon dioxide and methane sorption have been measured over a temperature range 0 to 200 C for both ACFMS and ACSC and similarities and differences related to the respective structures and mechanisms of interaction with the sorbed components. Nitrogen sorption (at 77 K) has been used to evaluate ''surface area'' and ''porosity'' for comparison with the large data base that exists for other activated carbons and related materials. The preliminary data base reveals that techniques and theories currently used to evaluate activated carbons may be somewhat erroneous and misleading. Alternate thermochemical and structural analyses have been developed that show promise in providing useful information related both to the activation process and to industrial applications of interest in the efficient and economical utilization of fossil fuels in a manner that is friendly to the earth's environment.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Fuller, E.L., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of deep seismic reflection and other data from the Southern Washington Cascades; Task No. 2, Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

Description: Limited possibilities exist for new hydrocarbon exploration regimes in the Pacific Northwest. Extensive geophysical studies have been used to outline a proposed sedimentary basin hidden beneath volcanic rocks of the Cascades region of southwestern Washington (Stanley et. al, 1992, AAPG Bull. 76, 1569-1585). Electrical geophysical imaging using the magnetotelluric (MT) method first detected thick, electrically conductive sequences believed to represent late Cretaceous to Oligocene marine sedimentary rocks. The conductive section occurs at depths from about 1 km to 10 km in the area west of a line between Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams, extending westward to a line between Mt. St. Helens and just west of Morton, WA. The conductive rocks reaches thicknesses as great as 10 km. The anomalous rocks appear to be very near the surface in the axis of anticlines that bring Eocene marine shales to shallow depths. Careful consideration of physical properties and the correspondence of the morphology of the units to known fold sets suggests that the high conductivities are related to lithologic/stratigraphic units rather than to variations in physical properties. Our preference for the lithology of the anomalous section, based upon a study of regional geology and structure, is one dominated by marine shales of Eocene and older age. Other possible lithologies that have been evaluated for the conductive section include nonmarine sedimentary units of Tertiary age, highly altered volcanic flows, and pre-Tertiary metasedimentary rocks with large percentages of graphite. We refer to this anomalously conductive region as the southern Washington Cascades conductor (SWCC).
Date: November 29, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geotechnology for low permeability gas reservoirs; [Progress report], April 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

Description: The objectives of this program are (1) to use and refine a basinal analysis methodology for natural fracture exploration and exploitation, and (2) to determine the important characteritics of natural fracture systems for their use in completion, stimulation and production operations. Continuing work on this project has demonstrated that natural fracture systems and their flow characteristics can be defined by a thorough study of well and outcrop data within a basin. Outcrop data provides key information on fracture sets and lithologic controls, but some fracture sets found in the outcrop may not exist at depth. Well log and core data provide the important reservoir information to obtain the correct synthesis of the fracture data. In situ stress information is then linked with the natural fracture studies to define permeability anisotropy and stimulation effectiveness. All of these elements require field data, and in the cases of logs, core, and well test data, the cooperation of an operator.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R. & Teufel, L.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The coprocessing of fossil fuels and biomass for CO{sub 2} emission reduction in the transportation sector

Description: Research is underway to evaluate the Hydrocarb process for conversion of carbonaceous raw material to clean carbon and methanol products. These products are valuable in the market either as fuel or as chemical commodities. As fuel, methanol and carbon can be used economically, either independently or in slurry form, in efficient heat energies (turbines and internal combustion engines) for both mobile and stationary single and combined cycle power plants. When considering CO{sub 2} emission control in the utilization of fossil fuels, the copressing of those fossil fuels with biomass (which may include, wood, municipal solid waste and sewage sludge) is a viable mitigation approach. By coprocessing both types of feedstock to produce methanol and carbon while sequestering all or part of the carbon, a significant net CO{sub 2} reduction is achieved if the methanol is substituted for petroleum fuels in the transportation sector. The Hydrocarb process has the potential, if the R&D objectives are achieved, to produce alternative transportation fuel from indigenous resources at lower cost than any other biomass conversion process. These comparisons suggest the resulting fuel can significantly displace gasoline at a competitive price while mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions and reducing ozone and other toxics in urban atmospheres.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Steinberg, M.; Dong, Yuanji & Borgwardt, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase 3, Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

Description: The objective of this Phase III program for the development of a commercial scale, coal-fired combustion system is to develop and integrate all system components from fuel through total system controls building upon the prior Phase I and II development accomplishments of the MTCI pulse combustion technology and to then field test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During this 13th quarter, a steam generation cost model was developed to compare the economics of steam production in the commercial-scale, coal-fired pulse combustion system with that in a natural gas- or oil-fired system. The purpose of this model is to define the competitive capital cost range for the MTCI system under a specified set of technical and economic conditions. A current preliminary estimate of the MTCI pulse coal combustion system capital cost turns out to be about $120,000 and this is within the target range of the US commercial boiler market sector. European differential fuel costs are expected to be more favorable. Several conceptual arrangements for coal reburn and char burnout were evaluated. The arrangement was selected based on the following considerations viz. utilization of the existing pulse combustor as is, minimization of footprint and vertical space requirement, good mixing of coal, steam and combustion products in the reburn section, and adequate char residence time in the char burnout section.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural gas recovery, storage, and utilization SBIR program

Description: A Fossil Energy natural-gas topic has been a part of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program since 1988. To date, 50 Phase SBIR natural-gas applications have been funded. Of these 50, 24 were successful in obtaining Phase II SBIR funding. The current Phase II natural-gas research projects awarded under the SBIR program and managed by METC are presented by award year. The presented information on these 2-year projects includes project title, awardee, and a project summary. The 1992 Phase II projects are: landfill gas recovery for vehicular natural gas and food grade carbon dioxide; brine disposal process for coalbed gas production; spontaneous natural as oxidative dimerization across mixed conducting ceramic membranes; low-cost offshore drilling system for natural gas hydrates; motorless directional drill for oil and gas wells; and development of a multiple fracture creation process for stimulation of horizontally drilled wells.The 1993 Phase II projects include: process for sweetening sour gas by direct thermolysis of hydrogen sulfide; remote leak survey capability for natural gas transport storage and distribution systems; reinterpretation of existing wellbore log data using neural-based patter recognition processes; and advanced liquid membrane system for natural gas purification.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Shoemaker, H.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hynol -- An economic process for methanol production from biomass and natural gas with reduced CO{sub 2} emission

Description: The Hynol process is proposed to meet the demand for an economical process for methanol production with reduced CO{sub 2} emission. This new process consists of three reaction steps: (a) hydrogasification of biomass, (b) steam reforming of the produced gas with additional natural gas feedstock, and (c) methanol synthesis of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced during the previous two steps. The H{sub 2}-rich gas remaining after methanol synthesis is recycled to gasify the biomass in an energy neutral reactor so that there is no need for an expensive oxygen plant as required by commercial steam gasifiers. Recycling gas allows the methanol synthesis reactor to perform at a relatively lower pressure than conventional while the plant still maintains high methanol yield. Energy recovery designed into the process minimizes heat loss and increases the process thermal efficiency. If the Hynol methanol is used as an alternative and more efficient automotive fuel, an overall 41% reduction in CO{sub 2} emission can be achieved compared to the use of conventional gasoline fuel. A preliminary economic estimate shows that the total capital investment for a Hynol plant is 40% lower than that for a conventional biomass gasification plant. The methanol production cost is $0.43/gal for a 1085 million gal/yr Hynol plant which is competitive with current U.S. methanol and equivalent gasoline prices. Process flowsheet and simulation data using biomass and natural gas as cofeedstocks are presented. The Hynol process can convert any condensed carbonaceous material, especially municipal solid waste (MSW), to produce methanol.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Steinberg, M. & Dong, Yuanji
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 1: World and regional fossil energy dynamics

Description: This report in the Hawaii Energy Strategy Project examines world and regional fossil energy dynamics. The topics of the report include fossil energy characteristics, the world oil industry including reserves, production, consumption, exporters, importers, refining, products and their uses, history and trends in the global oil market and the Asia-Pacific market; world gas industry including reserves, production, consumption, exporters, importers, processing, gas-based products, international gas market and the emerging Asia-Pacific gas market; the world coal industry including reserves, classification and quality, utilization, transportation, pricing, world coal market, Asia-Pacific coal outlook, trends in Europe and the Americas; and environmental trends affecting fossil fuels. 132 figs., 46 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Breazeale, K.; Isaak, D.T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Fridley, D.; Johnson, C. & Long, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hawaii Energy Strategy Project 2: Fossil Energy Review. Task IV. Scenario development and analysis

Description: The Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) Program is a seven-project effort led by the State of Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism (DBEDT) to investigate a wide spectrum of Hawaii energy issues. The East-West Center`s Program on Resources: Energy and Minerals, has been assigned HES Project 2, Fossil Energy Review, which focuses on fossil energy use in Hawaii and the greater regional and global markets. HES Project 2 has four parts: Task I (World and Regional Fossil Energy Dynamics) covers petroleum, natural gas, and coal in global and regional contexts, along with a discussion of energy and the environment. Task II (Fossil Energy in Hawaii) focuses more closely on fossil energy use in Hawaii: current utilization and trends, the structure of imports, possible future sources of supply, fuel substitutability, and energy security. Task III`s emphasis is Greenfield Options; that is, fossil energy sources not yet used in Hawaii. This task is divided into two sections: first, an in-depth {open_quotes}Assessment of Coal Technology Options and Implications for the State of Hawaii,{close_quotes} along with a spreadsheet analysis model, which was subcontracted to the Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division of Argonne National Laboratory; and second, a chapter on liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the Asia-Pacific market and the issues surrounding possible introduction of LNG into the Hawaii market.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Yamaguchi, N.D. & Breazeale, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 3 -- Greenfield options: Prospects for LNG use

Description: This paper begins with an overview of the Asia-Pacific LNG market, its major players, and the likely availability of LNG supplies in the region. The discussion then examines the possibilities for the economic supply of LNG to Hawaii, the potential Hawaiian market, and the viability of an LNG project on Oahu. This survey is far from a complete technical assessment or an actual engineering/feasibility study. The economics alone cannot justify LNG`s introduction. The debate may continue as to whether fuel diversification and environmental reasons can outweigh the higher costs. Several points are made. LNG is not a spot commodity. Switching to LNG in Hawaii would require a massive, long-term commitment and substantial investments. LNG supplies are growing very tight in the Asia-Pacific region. Some of the environmental benefits of LNG are not entirely relevant in Hawaii because Hawaii`s air quality is generally excellent. Any air quality benefits may be more than counterbalanced by the environmental hazards connected with large-scale coastal zone construction, and by the safety hazards of LNG carriers, pipelines, etc. Lastly, LNG is not suitable for all energy uses, and is likely to be entirely unsuitable for neighbor island energy needs.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Breazeale, K.; Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Pezeshki, S. & Wu, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Short-term energy outlook, Quarterly projections. Third quarter 1993

Description: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the third quarter of 1993 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Values for the second quarter of 1993, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data are EIA data published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding.
Date: August 4, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993

Description: The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.
Date: August 6, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural gas imports and exports; Fourth quarterly report, 1993

Description: The Office of Fuels Programs prepares quarterly reports summarizing the data provided by companies authorized to import or export natural gas. Companies are required, as a condition of their authorizations, to file quarterly reports with the OFP. This report is for the fourth quarter of 1993 (October--December). Attachment A shows the percentage of takes to maximum firm contract levels and the weighted average per unit price for each of the long-term importers during the 5 most recent reporting quarters. Attachment B shows volumes and prices of gas purchased by long-term importers and exporters during the past 12 months. Attachment C shows volume and price information for gas imported on a short-term basis. Attachment D shows the gas exported on a short-term basis to Canada and Mexico. During 1993, data indicates gas imports grew by about 10 percent over the 1992 level (2328 vs. 2122 Bcf), with Canadian and Algerian imports increasing by 8 and 82 percent, respectively. During the same time period, exports declined by 41 percent (144 vs. 243 Bcf). Exports to Canada decreased 47 percent from the 1992 level (50 vs. 95 Bcf) and exports to Mexico decreased by 60 percent (38 vs. 95 Bcf).
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well wastewaters. Quarterly technical report, May 25, 1993-August 24, 1993

Description: In the third quarterly report adsorption of heavy metals ions such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI) onto soils drawn from the laboratory-type wetland was shown to be weak. Secondly, it was shown that modified-clays did adsorb Cr(VI) ions strongly at pH 4.5. Further, studies on the pH dependence of the adsorption of {beta}-naphthoic acid, (NA), a well-documented contaminant in many oil and gas well waste waters onto modified-clays were undertaken and it was shown that uptake of NA by modified-clays was of the high affinity type at pH 4.5 and 7.0, but weak at pH 9.0. Adsorption of heavy metal ions, Cu{sup 2+}, and Cr(VI) onto algae, a proposed wetland amendment, was carried out and the results were presented and discussed in the fourth quarterly report. Uptake of NA by the soil component of the laboratory-type wetland was monitored as a function of pH. This quarterly report presents results from studies on the uptake of phenol and {beta}-naphthoic acid by laboratory-type wetlands designed and built during the earlier phases of this study. The uptake of phenol by the wetlands is quite rapid, and nearly complete in 50 hours, but it was also found that evaporative losses of phenol from the supernatant water during the same time period was considerable. On the other hand, {beta}-naphthoic acid (NA) is sorbed quite slowly and there was no indication of evaporative losses in the case on NA.
Date: October 4, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity; Final report, November 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

Description: The Alaskan North Slope comprises one of the Nation`s and the world`s most prolific oil province. Original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at nearly 70 BBL (Kamath and Sharma, 1986). Generalized reservoir descriptions have been completed by the University of Alaska`s Petroleum Development Laboratory over North Slope`s major fields. These fields include West Sak (20 BBL OOIP), Ugnu (15 BBL OOIP), Prudhoe Bay (23 BBL OOIP), Kuparuk (5.5 BBL OOIP), Milne Point (3 BBL OOIP), and Endicott (1 BBL OOIP). Reservoir description has included the acquisition of open hole log data from the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (AOGCC), computerized well log analysis using state-of-the-art computers, and integration of geologic and logging data. The studies pertaining to fluid characterization described in this report include: experimental study of asphaltene precipitation for enriched gases, CO{sup 2} and West Sak crude system, modeling of asphaltene equilibria including homogeneous as well as polydispersed thermodynamic models, effect of asphaltene deposition on rock-fluid properties, fluid properties of some Alaskan north slope reservoirs. Finally, the last chapter summarizes the reservoir heterogeneity classification system for TORIS and TORIS database.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Sharma, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1993

Description: Natural gas hydrates are crystalline materials formed of natural gas and water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures. Because natural gas hydrates can plug drill strings, pipelines, and process equipment, there is much effort expended to prevent their formation. The goal of this project was to provide industry with more economical hydrate inhibitors. The specific goals for the past year were to: continue both screening and high pressure experiments to determine optimum inhibitors; investigate molecular mechanisms of hydrate formation/inhibition, through microscopic and macroscopic experiments; begin controlled tests on the Exxon pilot plant loop at their Houston facility; and continue to act as a forum for the sharing of field test results. Progress on these objectives are described in this report.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

Description: The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An experimental study of NO{sub x} recycle in the NOXSO flue gas cleanup process. Final report

Description: NO{sub x} recycle represents one part of the NOXSO process. This process can remove 90% of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} simultaneously from flue gas by using a fluidized bed of sorbent. Spent sorbent is regenerated by treatment at high temperatures with a reducing gas. Adsorbed NO{sub x} is evolved on heating the sorbent to a regeneration temperature. The concentrated stream of NO{sub x} produced is returned to the boiler with the combustion air and reduced in the flame, which is called NO{sub x} recycle. The concept of NO{sub x} recycle has been experimentally evaluated at the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). NO{sub x} destruction has been demonstrated on a 500 lb/hr pulverized coal combustor and a 1.7 MMBtu/hr tunnel furnace combustor firing both natural gas and coal-water slurry. The NO{sub x} recycle experimental study discussed in this report and performed on Babcock & Wilcox (B&W)`s six MMBtu/hr Small Boiler Simulator (SBS) is a pilot-scale test. The objective is to provide further fundamental understanding and necessary information for the NOXSO full-scale demonstration at Ohio Edison`s Niles Power Plant which uses the same type of cyclone burners. The experimental testing included injection of NO, NO{sub x} and different combinations of NO/NO{sub 2} with tile primary air (PA) and secondary air (SA) to the combustor. Results are consistent with earlier test data obtained on PETC`s facility and will be used for the design of the NOXSO commercial demonstration plant at Niles.
Date: March 1993
Creator: Zhou, Q.; Haslbeck, J. L. & Neal, L. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct aromatization of methane; Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

Description: The pyrolysis of methane in the absence of a quench was studied at temperatures between 900 and 1050{degrees}C and methane flows of 80--200 Scc/min. At 1050{degrees}C and a methane flow rate of 100 Scc/minute, methane conversion ranged between 15--19% with the major products being benzene, acetylene, and ethylene. The benzene molar selectivity was ca. 50%, corresponding to molar yield of ca. 7.5--10%. The reaction resulted in the formation of visible amounts of solid carbon, particularly at 1050{degrees}C. The resulting solid consisted partly of carbon and partly of a yellowish tar-like material which was soluble in toluene and contained various heavy hydrocarbons and polyring aromatics.
Date: October 8, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proceedings of the 1993 InterAmerican Petroleum and Gas Conference

Description: The 1993 InterAmerican Petroleum and Gas Conference (IPGC) took place September 27--28, 1993, in Dallas Texas. The EPGC was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, organized by the East-West Center and hosted by the Institute for the Study of Earth and Man at Southern Methodist University. The IPGC brought together senior oil industry and government representatives from the United States and Latin America to discuss energy security and more efficient resource utilization through improved cooperation and integration of upstream and downstream activities in the United States and Latin America with an emphasis on technology investments and complementary trade strategies. Special attention was given to the growing opportunities for private and foreign investment, trade and joint commercial ventures between US and Latin American companies. The papers included in these proceedings include most of the presentations offered at the conference that addressed a number of key issues including financial challenges of the hydrocarbon sector, regional and national outlook on the world oil market, upstream and downstream outlook, role of natural gas, and environment and infrastructure requirements. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fifteenth combustion research conference

Description: The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.
Date: June 1, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department