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Report of the Task Force on detector Research and Development for the Superconducting Super Collider

Description: This report contains a: Report of the working group on tracking devices; report of the working group on calorimetry; report of the working group on muon, electron and hadron identification; report of the working group on electronics, triggering, data acquisition and computing; report of the working group on superconducting magnets; and report of the working group on Monte Carlo development.
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle identification in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions

Description: The role of particle identification (PID) in both fixed-target and colliding-beam studies of ultrarelativistic nuclear (URN) collisions is examined. The demands placed on the PID systems by peculiarities of URN collisions, such as large multiplicities and the need for simultaneous measurement of a number of observables, are discussed. A variety of PID techniques are reviewed, with emphasis on their applicability and efficiency in the environment of such collisions. Two examples of PID as incorporated into existing fixed-target nuclear-beam experiments are presented. 18 refs., 5 figs.
Date: April 1, 1986
Creator: DiGiacomo, N.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of a uranium liquid argon calorimeter

Description: We present results on the performance of a uranium and liquid argon calorimeter in the NW test beam at Fermilab. We describe the calorimeter, and discuss its performance with electrons, pions and muons from 10 GeV to 150 GeV. The performance perameters measured include response, linearity, resolution, compensation, and e/..pi.. separation.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Tuts, P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Forward spectrometers at the SSC

Description: Most of SSC phase space and a great deal of physics potential is in the forward/backward region (absolute value of theta < 100 mrad). Comprehensive open-geometry spectrometers are feasible and very cost effective. Examples of such devices are sketched. Because such spectrometers are very long and may operate at high ..beta.. and longer bunch spacing, they impact now on SSC interaction - region design. The data acquisition load is as heavy as for central detectors, although there may be less emphasis on speed and more emphasis on sophisticated parallel and/or distributed processing for event selection, as well as on high-capacity buffering.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Bjorken, J.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

Description: LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.
Date: April 1, 1986
Creator: Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Identifying heavy Higgs bosons

Description: Two techniques for identifying heavy Higgs bosons produced at SSC energies are discussed. In the first, the Higgs boson decays into ZZ, with one Z decaying into an e-pair or ..mu..-pair and the other into a neutrino pair. In the second, the production of the Higgs boson by WW fusion is tagged by detecting the quarks that produced the bremsstrahlung virtual W's. The associated Higgs decay is identified by one leptonic and one hadronic decay. Both methods appear capable of finding a heavy Higgs boson provided the SSC design parameters are achieved. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1986
Creator: Cahn, R.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test beam results for silicon microstrip detectors with VLSI read-out

Description: A telescope consisting of three silicon microstrip detectors has been tested in a high energy positron beam at SLAC. Each detector has trips with 25 micron pitch and is read out by two 128-channel NMOS integrated circuits (''Microplex''). Results on the signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution, and two-track separation are given.
Date: April 1, 1986
Creator: Adolphsen, C.; Litke, A.; Schwarz, A.; Turala, M.; Lueth, V.; Breakstone, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decays of the tau lepton

Description: Previous measurements of the branching fractions of the tau lepton result in a discrepancy between the inclusive branching fraction and the sum of the exclusive branching fractions to final states containing one charged particle. The sum of the exclusive branching fractions is significantly smaller than the inclusive branching fraction. In this analysis, the branching fractions for all the major decay modes are measured simultaneously with the sum of the branching fractions constrained to be one. The branching fractions are measured using an unbiased sample of tau decays, with little background, selected from 207 pb/sup -1/ of data accumulated with the Mark II detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The sample is selected using the decay products of one member of the ..gamma../sup +/..gamma../sup -/ pair produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to identify the event and then including the opposite member of the pair in the sample. The sample is divided into subgroups according to charged and neutral particle multiplicity, and charged particle identification. The branching fractions are simultaneously measured using an unfold technique and a maximum likelihood fit. The results of this analysis indicate that the discrepancy found in previous experiments is possibly due to two sources. First, the leptonic branching fractions measured in this analysis are about one standard deviation higher than the world average. The measured leptonic branching fractions correspond to a tau lifetime of (3.0 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -13/ s. Secondly, the total branching fraction to one charged hadron plus at least one neutral particle is measured to be (7 +- 3)% higher than the branching fraction expected from a combination of previous measurements and theoretical predictions. It is shown that decay modes involving the eta are not expected to contribute more than 3% to this excess.
Date: February 1, 1986
Creator: Burchat, P.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Colliding beam detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

Description: After a brief discussion of the requirements for the detectors to be used at the SSC, the components of a typical detector are discussed individually, and how they may fit into a full detector is indicated. The requirements indicated include the ability to detect and measure the directions and energies of quarks, gluons, leptons and photons; ability to handle appropriately high energies and high luminosities; and affordability, buildability, and operability. The components discussed include tracking detectors (such as drift chambers, calorimeters, lepton identification and energy measurement systems, triggering, and a 4..pi.. detector. (LEW)
Date: October 1, 1986
Creator: Trilling, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the working group on detector simulation

Description: An ad hoc group at Snowmass reviewed the need for detector simulation to support detectors at the SSC. This report first reviews currently available programs for detector simulation, both those written for single specific detectors and those aimed at general utility. It then considers the requirements for detector simulation for the SSC, with particular attention to enhancements that are needed relative to present programs. Finally, a list of recommendations is given.
Date: January 1, 1986
Creator: Price, L.E. & Lebrun, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department