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Heber Geothermal Project, binary-cycle demonstration plant. Volume II. Proposal abstract

Description: San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E) believes that the binary-cycle offers an improved method of converting moderate temperature geothermal resources into electric power. The process, shown schematically in figure 1-1, has significant advantages over existing methods of geothermal power generation. The advantages of the binary process are that greater amounts of power can be generated from a given resource, fewer wells are needed to support a given power output, and the binary-cycle is expected to be more economical than the flash process for this type of resource. Another advantage is that the binary-cycle is a closed process and thus enhances environmental acceptability. In addition, this process is applicable to a larger range of the nations geothermal reservoirs. It is estimated that 80% of the nation's hydrothermal resources can be classified as moderate temperature (300 to 410 F) resources. The flash process, commonly used to convert high temperature geothermal resources to electric power, is technically feasible for moderate temperature resources. However, when compared to the binary process for moderate temperature applications, the flash process conversion efficiency is lower, environmental impacts may require abatement, and power production costs may not be commercially competitive.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Lacy, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES

Description: Ecologically sound operations of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants can be insured by careful attention to the marine environment during the design phase. this requires quality information from regions of potential OTEC interest, coordinated with required assessment studies to insure legal compliance. Currently, preliminary or actual surveys and laboratory studies are being conducted in the waters of Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii, and Guam for potential moored or seacoast OTEC plants and in the equatorial South Atlantic for proposed plant-ship operations to provide such benchmark and baseline data. These data plus existing archival information can be used to model effects of OTEC operations based on projected design schemes. Four major areas of concerns (1) redistribution of oceanic properties, (2) chemical pollution, (3) structural effects, and (4) socio-legal-economic; and 11 key issues associated with OTEC deployment and operation have been identified. In general mitigating strategies can be used to alleviate many deleterious environmental effects of operational problems as biostimulation, outgassing, etc. Various assessment research studies on toxicity, biocide releases, etc., are under way or are planned to investigate areas where no clear mitigating strategy is available. Data from the monitoring and assessment programs is being integrated into a series of environmental compliance documents including a comprehensive programmatic environmental impact assessment.
Date: June 1, 1979
Creator: Wilde, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Energy Market Study on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A Review of Recent Energy Price Projections for Traditional Space Heating Fuel 1985-2000

Description: In order to develop an initial estimate of the potential competitiveness of low temperature (45 degrees C to 100 degrees C) geothermal resources on the Eastern Coastal Plain, the Center for Metropolitant Planning and Research of The Johns Hopkins University reviewed and compared available energy price projections. Series of projections covering the post-1985 period have been made by the Energy Information Administration, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and by private research firms. Since low temperature geothermal energy will compete primarily for the space and process heating markets currently held by petroleum, natural gas, and electricity, projected trends in the real prices for these fuels were examined. The spread in the current and in projected future prices for these fuels, which often serve identical end uses, underscores the influence of specific attributes for each type of fuel, such as cleanliness, security of supply, and governmental regulation. Geothermal energy possesses several important attributes in common with electricity (e.g., ease of maintenance and perceived security of supply), and thus the price of electric space heating is likely to be an upper bound on a competitive price for geothermal energy. Competitiveness would, of course, be increased if geothermal heat could be delivered for prices closer to those for oil and natural gas. The projections reviewed suggest that oil and gas prices will rise significantly in real terms over the next few decades, while electricity prices are projected to be more stable. Electricity prices will, however, remain above those for the other two fuels. The significance of this work rests on the fact that, in market economies, prices provide the fundamental signals needed for efficient resource allocation. Although market prices often fail to fully account for factors such as environmental impacts and long-term scarcity value, they nevertheless embody a considerable amount of information and are the primary ...
Date: March 1, 1979
Creator: Weissbrod, Richard & Barron, William
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Assessment -- Hydrothermal Geothermal Subprogram

Description: This environmental impact assessment addresses the design, construction, and operation of an electric generating plant (3 to 4 MWe) and research station (Hawaii Geothermal Research Station (HGRS)) in the Puna district on the Island of Hawaii. The facility will include control and support buildings, parking lots, cooling towers, settling and seepage ponds, the generating plant, and a visitors center. Research activities at the facility will evaluate the ability of a successfully flow-tested well (42-day flow test) to provide steam for power generation over an extended period of time (two years). In future expansion, research activities may include direct heat applications such as aquaculture and the effects of geothermal fluids on various plant components and specially designed equipment on test modules. Construction-related impacts would be relatively minor. Construction of the facility will require the distance of about 1.7 ha (4.1 acres). No further disturbance is anticipated, unless it becomes necessary to replace the seepage pond with an injection well, because the production well is in service and adjacent roads and transmission lines are adequate. Disruption of competing land uses will be minimal, and loss of wildlife habitat will be acceptable. Noise should not significantly affect wildlife and local residents; the most noise activities (well drilling and flow testing) have been completed. Water use during construction will not be large, and impacts on competing uses are unlikely. Socio-economic impacts will be small because the project will not employ a large number of local residents and few construction workers will need to find local housing.
Date: June 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study of upgrading Byllesby and Buck power plants on the New River in the Commonwealth of Virginia

Description: The feasibility of upgrading alternatives of the 66-year-old Byllesby and Buck hydroelectric developments located on the New River in Virginia was investigated. Evaluation of technical, economic and environmental factors led to the conclusion that modernization of the plants could result in an annual generation increase of 20.2 GWh at a cost of $6.1 million and with a benefit-cost ratio of 2.32. The recommended retrofitting includes replacing existing runners with new, more efficiently designed runners, modifying draft tube and wicker gate, and rewinding the generators. (LCL)
Date: May 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility assessment of low-head hydroelectric development at the Peninsular Paper Company dam in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Final report

Description: The results of a study into the feasibility of developing a small, low-head dam site for hydroelectric generation in southeastern Michigan are presented. Average hydraulic head at the site is 13.0 ft, mean stream flow is 498 cfs. Economic, environmental and institutional factors were considered. Seven specific hypothetical designs were examined in detail, including vertical, bulb, cross-flow and tubular turbine designs. It was determined that the production capacity of the facility had an important influence on the cost-effectiveness of the project. A detailed benefit/cost analysis was conducted to identify the optimum facility size in terms of incremental costs and benefits. From an economic standpoint, it was found that the most cost-effective design for developing the site, although profitable, would not be financially attractive to the owner compared to other investment opportunities with which the company is faced. The projected after-tax return on investment for the project, based on current costs, was projected to be from 2 to 6%, depending upon the depreciation basis used. The project would, however, have a favorable effect on the corporation's working capital. The environmental issues associated with the development of the site would be relatively minor. The most important consequence would be enhanced public safety due to structural repairs to the dam and the availability of a small, independent source of electric generation that could be called on in times of power outages or natural disaster.
Date: March 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal energy systems plan for Boise City

Description: This is a plan for development of a downtown Boise geothermal district space heating system incorporating legal, engineering, organizational, geological, and economic requirements. Topics covered include: resource characteristics, system design and feasibility, economic feasibility, legal overview, organizational alternatives, and conservation. Included in appendices are: property ownership patterns on the Boise Front, existing hot well data, legal briefs, environmental data, decision point communications, typical building heating system retrofit schematics, and background assumptions and data for cost summary. (MHR)
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of the feasibility of recommissioning the French Landing Hydroelectric Facility in Van Buren Township, Michigan. Final report

Description: The results of a study of the feasibility of recommissioning a small, low-head hydroelectric facility in southeastern Michigan are presented. The study concludes that there are several cost-effective designs for recommissioning the site, based on the use of vertical turbines and the sale of power to nearby industrial markets. In terms of the bulk sale of power to the local electric utility, no cost-effective alternatives were found to exist. A major burden on project cost-effectiveness was found to be the relatively large costs for structural repairs to the dam and powerhouse needed to insure safe operation and on adequate service life. From an engineering standpoint it was found that the items of equipment needed to recommission the site are readily available from both US and foreign manufacturers. A variety of hydraulic turbine designs could be successfully adapted to the existing powerhouse, without extensive new construction. It was determined that the production capacity of the facility had an important influence on the cost-effectiveness of the project. A detailed benefit/cost analysis was conducted to identify the optimum facility size in terms of incremental costs and revenues. A detailed environmental assessment using an impact matrix methodology concluded that the development of the facility for hydroelectric generation would have important positive environmental consequences related to improved impoundment and flow management techniques as well as enhanced public safety due to structural repairs to the dam. The institutional and regulatory implications of developing the site for hydroelectric generation were found to be significant but manageable.
Date: February 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Development Plan for space applications

Description: The Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies the planning and management requirements and schedules needed to evaluate and assess the environmental, health and safety aspects of the Space Applications Program. Environment is defined in its broadest sense to include environmental, health (occupational and public, safety, socioeconomic, legal, and institutional apsects. EDP has been limited to consideration of: (1) space nuclear power system nuclear fuel fabrication; (2) space nuclear power system heat source fabrication; (3) testing of subsystems and assembled systems; (4)research and development (R and D) in support of space nuclear system development; (5) nuclear system responses to launch and reentry accidents: and (6) nuclear system environmental behavior and recovery. (TFD)
Date: September 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of geothermal heat for sugar refining in Imperial County: environmental assessment and monitoring plan

Description: This environmental monitoring and reporting plan is based on requirements set by the State of California, Water Quality Control Board, and the Division of Oil and Gas as well as special requirements by the County of Imperial, Air Pollution Control Board and other county offices. This plan addresses all of the applicable environmental impacts identified in the Final Environmental Report. Each item of the environmental monitoring and reporting requirements is addressed in terms of (a) impact; (b) mitigation measures and/or engineering practices; and (c) monitoring and reporting requirements. An overall summary of all of the reporting requirements is contained.
Date: December 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Woodruff Narrows low head hydroelectric power plant feasibility determination

Description: Woodruff Narrows Reservoir, owned by the State of Utah, was built in 1961 as an irrigation reservoir. The reservoir outlet works and spillway are in need of repair, and plans have been made to enlarge the reservoir from its present capacity of 28,000 acre-feet to 53,200 acre-feet when these repairs are made. The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to add hydropower facilities when the reservoir is repaired and enlarged. A computer simulation model based on mean monthly values, utilizing 26 years of recorded streamflow into the reservoir, was used to determine the mean annual energy potential for the following configurations: (1) present dam, (2) the proposed enlarged dam, (3) a new dam at the lower site with a maximum head of 65 feet, and (4) a new dam at the lower site which would store water to the same elevation as the proposed enlarged dam. Results of the simulation study show that maximum power capacities are respectively 2.1, 3.0, 3.9, and 4.5 megawatts. The marketing potential for this electric power, cost estimates and financial analysis, and environmental, social, and regulatory aspects of the proposed hydropower facilities were evaluated. The results showed the addition of hydroelectric power development at the Woodruff Narrows site would have minimal social and environmental effects on the area, would result in little or no changes in the present patterns of water and land use, income, population, and employment and would not result in any significant changes of the social structure or characteristics of the area. However, hydroelectric power development at the Woodruff Narrows site is not economically feasible at the present time. (LCL)
Date: March 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary analysis of the study of a Nuclear Energy Center at Green River, Utah

Description: The planning phase for the study of a conceptualized Regional Nuclear Energy Center (NEC) at Green River, Utah to serve a four state area is discussed and an outline of the proposed study is presented. It is assumed that the more technical issues of a NEC have already been studied in detail for generic sites and that this study will address the site specific impacts of a NEC at a representative site. The emphasis will be on the institutional, legal, political, sociological, economic and environmental impacts of a NEC. An assessment is made of the willingness and ability of related public and private entities to participate in the study. These include local, state and regional government agencies, colleges and universities, research organizations, private firms and consultants, and relevant federal agencies in Utah and the region.
Date: March 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study of low-head hydrolectric power on Carlyle Reservoir for the Carlyle, Illinois Municipal Electric Utility - City of Carlyle, Illinois

Description: The feasibility of the city of Carlyle, Illinois developing hydroelectric power on Carlyle Reservoir was determined. The hydrologic conditions under which the proposed project would operate were investigated herein along with the marketability of production from the facility and the facility's compatability with present reservoir functions as well as with the environment. A conceptual plant design has been developed in detail for a power plant consisting of two horizontal shaft, adjustable blade, fixed vane hydroelectric turbines each connected through speed increasing gear boxes to 4375 kW generators. The site selected is west of and immediately adjacent to the stilling basin of the spillway for Carlyle Reservoir. Two 13.5 penstocks would be bored through the existing concrete non-overflow dam adjacent to the present gated spillway structure. The total estimated project cost is $7,550,000 or an average of $863.00 per installed kilowatt. The development of the proposed project is believed to require 45 months and will produce an estimated average annual output of approximately 21,500,000 kWh. The conceptual design herein developed is believed to have the capability of an eventual detailed engineering design which will be acceptable to all approving authorities, and particularly the U.S. Corps of Engineers.
Date: March 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program: Phase I, Volume I. Final report

Description: The Energy Economic Data Base Program, which deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations, provides periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel, and operating and maintenance) information of significance to DOE. The information allows for evaluation and monitoring of US civilian nuclear power programs and provides a consistent means of evaluation the nuclear option against alternatives. Currently, the EEDB contains 6 nuclear electrical generating plant technical models and 5 comparison coal-fired electrical generating plant technical models. Each of these technical plant models is a complete conceptual design for a single unit, steam electric power generating station located on a standard, hypothetical Middletown site. A description of the site is provided in Appendix A-1 (Volume 2) for nuclear plants, and Appendix A-2 (Volume 2) for coal-fired plants. The EEDB also includes a conceptual design of a coal liquefaction plant for comparison purposes. Volume 1 provides a description of the current Data Base, as of September 30, 1978: gives assumptions and ground rules for the initial-cost update; summarizes the initial cost update, with cost results tabulated; details the initial update of the technical conceptual design, the capital cost, the quantities of commodities and their unit costs, and craft labor man hours and costs for each EEDB program model; and details the fuel-cycle-cost initial update and the operating- and maintenance-cost initial update. Finally, an extensive list of references and a glossary are presented.
Date: December 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy self-sufficiency in Northampton, Massachusetts

Description: The study is not an engineering analysis but begins the process of exploring the potential for conservation and local renewable-resource development in a specific community, Northampton, Massachusetts, with the social, institutional, and environmental factors in that community taken into account. Section I is an extensive executive summary of the full study, and Section II is a detailed examination of the potential for increased local energy self-sufficiency in Northampton, including current and future demand estimates, the possible role of conservation and renewable resources, and a discussion of the economic and social implications of alternative energy systems. (MOW)
Date: October 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems: program summaries for 1979

Description: This Center, founded in January 1976, is one of four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major ongoing activities of the Center concern integrated, quantitative analyses of technological, economic, and environmental aspects of energy at the regional, national, and international levels. The objectives, activities, and sources of support of each of the programs are described and the major accomplishments during the year are outlined. Some of the planned future activities of the Center are indicated, and recent publications are listed.
Date: December 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program: Small-Scale Industrial Project. Environmental assessment statement

Description: Solid, liquid, and gaseous by-products and wastes are generated during coal storage and processing, gasification, and gas cleanup. Recovery systems have been designed to collect and utilize by-products. Wastes will be placed in storage areas designed to prevent release of the materials to the environment. The coal gasification plant along with the solid waste disposal area will occupy approximately 115 acres. To prevent, to the fullest extent possible, degradation of groundwater and surface water resources, the coal stockpile, landfill, collection pond, settling basin, and drainage ditches will be constructed to prevent the seepage of potential contaminants into groundwater or the drainage of runoff into surface waters. Cooling water is the primary water requirement of the project. None of the water utilized in the gasification plant will be released into the area surface water system, but will be either recycled or directed into the settling basin. The gasification facility has the potential of emitting a broad spectrum of pollutants into the atmosphere. However, effective emission control procedures such as off-gas recycling, hydrogen sulfide removal, particulate removal, and flaring will be applied to minimize the plant's emissions. The necessity of monitoring the more exotic pollutants such as acid gases, trace elements, metal carbonyls, and a multitude of organic compounds, will be determined as the gasification facility becomes more of a reality and the latest literature and research developments can be surveyed to evaluate the emission rates, biological significance, and monitoring techniques for these pollutants.
Date: February 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heat-pump-centered integrated community energy systems. Final report

Description: A Heat Pump Centered-Integrated Community Energy System (HP-ICES) concept was explored and developed that is based on use of privately owned ice-making heat pumps in each building or complex within a community. These heat pumps will provide all of the space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water needs. All of the community input energy required is provided by electrical power, thereby eliminating a community's dependence on gas or oil supplies. The heat pumps will operate in both air and water source modes, deriving performance advantages of both. The possible forms of an HP-ICES system, the technical and economic limitations, environmental impacts and other factors are discussed from a general viewpoint. The concept is applied to a specific planned community and its performance and economic features are examined in detail. It is concluded that the HP-ICES concept is technically viable, but that its economic desirability as compared with conventional heat pump systems is hampered by much higher initial costs, and that the economic feasibility of HP-ICES systems will depend on future fuel source costs and supply and on electric power rates. (LCL)
Date: November 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program: Westmorland Development Project, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment

Description: The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by DOE to finance geothermal exploration, development, and testing by Mapco Geothermal, Inc. and Republic Geothermal, Inc. in the Westmorland area of Imperial County, California. Initial drilling and flow testing of up to three production wells will occur in the exploratory phase. Exploration is proposed for either or both of two portions of the leasehold area. If exploration confirms the presence of a viable resource in the Sweetwater area, the preferred site based on limited temperature data, then up to 19 new production wells and three new injection wells may be drilled and tested there in preparation for the construction of a 55-MW double-flash electric power plant. If, however, the Sweetwater resource proves infeasible, further exploration and possible full-field development may occur instead at the Dearborn-Kalin-Landers area. At this site, up to 19 new production wells and three new injection wells may be drilled and tested, with six existing wells also used for injection. This environmental assessment chiefly addresses effects of the drilling and testing program. In summary, this paper discusses the proposed action, describes the existing environment and discusses the potential environmental impacts. 75 refs. (LSP)
Date: April 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Satellite Power Systems (SPS): concept development and evaluation program, preliminary assessment

Description: The Satellite Power System (SPS) is an emerging concept for capturing solar energy in space for use in producing electrical energy on earth. To develop an understanding of the technical and economic feasibility and of the environmental and societal acceptability of the SPS is an enormous challenge. The Department of Energy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are engaged in a three-year assessment of the SPS that began in the fall of 1977 and will be completed in the summer of 1980. The DOE/NASA assessment is engaging the efforts of many organizations in the United States and is developing a large body of information. At approximately the mid-point of the assessment, this preliminary project assessment report describes what has been done and what has been learned with an emphasis on the overriding issues.
Date: September 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Description and assessment of the Raft River Lotic system in the vicinity of the Raft River Geothermal Area. Annual report

Description: The Raft River is the only perennial lotic system within this area and one concern has been the impact a spill of geothermal water would have on the biota of the stream. Identification of the structure of these communities is the baseline information which was the objective of this study. The results of the inventory in terms of potential recovery of downstream communities from the impact of geothermal water induced perturbations are discussed.
Date: December 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment: Geokinetics, Inc. oil shale research project, Uintah County, Utah

Description: Geokinetics, Inc. (GKI) proposes to complete the remaining experimental program to develop the LOFRECO modified horizontal in situ oil shale retorting process. This Environmental Assessment Report addresses the impacts of the project, located in a remote area of east-central Utah, about 70 miles south of both Vernal and Roosevelt.
Date: December 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment: tar sand in situ steam injection experiment

Description: A field experiment is planned for the in situ recovery of bitumen from tar sand. The site is located on a ten acre site 6.5 miles West of Vernal, Utah, and the experiment will last about six months. The experiment will utilize steam to lower the viscosity of the bitumen and drive it into production wells where it is recovered. Due to the small scale of this experiment, the impact of the proposed action will be minimal. Impact on local biological life will be minimal. The experiment will have no effect on aquatic habitats. No rare or endangered biological species will be affected by the experiment.
Date: December 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental development plan: geothermal energy systems

Description: To ensure that environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) considerations are addressed adequately in the technology decision making process, the Environmental Development Plan (EDP) identifies and evaluates EH and S concerns; defines EH and S research and related assessments to examine or resolve the concerns; provides a coordinated schedule with the technology program for required EH and S research and developement; and indicates the timing for Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Environmental Readiness Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports. This EDP for geothermal energy systems covers all current and planned activities of the DOE Geothermal Energy Systems. Hydrothermal convection systems, geopressured systems, and hot-dry-rock systems are covered. Environmental concerns and requirements for resolution of these concerns are discussed at length. (MHR)
Date: August 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department