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Presentation to the Atomic Energy Commission and the Air Force, June 14, 1962

Description: This volume contains the charts and backup material presented to the Atomic Energy Commission and Air Force on June 14, 1962 concerning General Electric's Nuclear Materials and Propulsion Operation (formerly the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Department), during its work on the development of a nuclear power plant for manned aircraft.
Date: October 1, 1962
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Equilibrium panel surface temperatures in the SNAP-2 instrument compartment

Description: By equating net radiation to space to I/sup 2/R heating in the SNAP-2 instrument compartments, and neglecting internal radiation between compartments, the panel surface equilibrium temperatures were computed for hot and cold temperature extremes. These extremes are defined by: (1) cold - pre-start phase in the shade, (2) hot - full power phase facing the sun. The results of the heat balances for hottest and coldest cases are presented graphically. These figures relate the equilibrium surface temperatures to the I/sup 2/R heat load dissipated by the panel surface for hot and cold orbits before and after startup. Included as parameters are effective panel area (dependent on Agena-interface design details) and the ..cap alpha../epsilon ratio for the surface coating. If ..cap alpha../epsilon = .3/.9 and A = 1 ft/sup 2/, the extremes of temperatures suffered are from -191/sup 0/F to +212/sup 0/F. This study shows that the normal R/C surface coating (..cap alpha../epsilon = .3/.9) is acceptable regarding allowable maximum surface temperatures, if the effective panel area is not less than 1 ft/sup 2/. It also indicates that further work is warranted regarding internal radiative distribution of heat in order to limit the lowest temperatures to -65/sup 0/F.
Date: September 14, 1962
Creator: Gresho, P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor statistics, Section III, April 1961--May 15, 1962. Reactor Simulation Study, Reactor 5

Description: The discussion and summary report presented here illustrate the type of information that is currently in data processing machine language and available to those who require it. During the progress meetings at which these reports were discussed, several persons indicated a desire to have a documented explanation of the report and a personal copy to scan. This is the answer to these requests. The reports are comprised of three major sections. The first is a map indicating the number of recordings of data in the category defined by the function number code. The second is a summary of the data, in terms of hours, for each of the functions performed during an outage, except secondary function code number 21 which is the number of tubes associated with the basic function performed. The third is a summary of the secondary functions performed within a basic function class, the associated delay total, and the number of tubes involved for those functions where a delineation by tube count may be of interest.
Date: June 13, 1962
Creator: Burke, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor statistics, Section III, April 1961--May 15, 1962. Reactor 2

Description: The discussion and summary report presented here illustrate the type of information that is currently in data processing machine language and available to those who require it. During the progress meetings at which these reports were discussed, several persons indicated a desire to have a documented explanation of the report and a personal copy to scan. This is the answer to these requests. The reports are comprised of three major sections. The first is a map indicating the number of recordings of data in the category defined by the function number code. The second is a summary of the data, in terms of hours, for each of the functions performed during an outage, except secondary function code number 21 which is the number of tubes associated with the basic function performed. The third is a summary of the secondary functions performed within a basic function class, the associated delay total, and the number of tubes involved for those functions where a delineation by tube count may be of interest.
Date: June 13, 1962
Creator: Burke, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor statistics, Section III, April 1961--May 15, 1962. Reactor 3

Description: The discussion and summary report presented here illustrate the type of information that is currently in data processing machine language and available to those who require it. During the progress meetings at which these reports were discussed, several persons indicated a desire to have a documented explanation of the report and a personal copy to scan. This is the answer to these requests. The reports are comprised of three major sections. The first is a map indicating the number of recordings of data in the category defined by the function number code. The second is a summary of the data, in terms of hours, for each of the functions performed during an outage, except secondary function code number 21 which is the number of tubes associated with the basic function performed. The third is a summary of the secondary functions performed within a basic function class, the associated delay total, and the number of tubes involved for those functions where a delineation by tube count may be of interest.
Date: June 13, 1962
Creator: Burke, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SNAP re-entry orbit; comments on the atmospheric entry and discussion of a proposed test

Description: In order to evaluate entry into the atmosphere of an oblate (equatorial bulge) earth a standard atmosphere was used in conjunction with the standard rotating oblate spheroid. The density variation encountered in any one polar orbit around the earth will vary by about a factor of ten, due to oblateness. Therefore, the important effects on the re-entry trajectory are atmospheric density and oblateness of the earth. The SNAP configuration burn up characteristics will differ considerably between the steep (6/sup 0/) entry of the NASA Scout test and the orbital decay trajectory. However, the test can verify heat transfer rates on the actual configuration, and by proper calculation of material response, the actual decay breakup prediction can be improved.
Date: August 3, 1962
Creator: Ackermann, W.O.; Arthur, P.D. & Nelson, D.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Examination of rupture from 1372-H (RM 454)

Description: A production fuel element which failed in tube 1372-H on March 12, 1962 at 263 MWD/T exposure was transferred to the Radiometallurgy Laboratory for examination to determine the cause of failure. The fuel geometry was 0 III N-B and the parent Lot was KZ-135 D. The failure was the result of mechanical damage to the cladding and cap at the male end prior to irradiation. A scrape or gouge at the male end reduced the cladding thickness drastically so that water entry to the uranium occurred after an incubation period of operation. Fabrication was not a factor in the failure as the male weld was found to be in good condition when metallurgically examined. The element as received may be seen in Figure 1. The mechanical damage on the cap in line with the rupture cavity was plainly visible. The formation of aluminum oxide over the marred surface indicated that the damage occurred prior to irradiation. The cladding was missing from over the rupture cavity and the fragments attached to the edge of the cap were extremely thin. It is possible that the entire cladding thickness was removed by the mechanical damage prior to or during charging. A diagonal split in the uranium emanating from the cavity isolated a small section of the fuel at the male end. Subsequent examination indicated that the split was the result of internal stress caused by the formation of voluminous uranium-water reaction product. Negligible corrosion of the cladding and supports was noted.
Date: September 12, 1962
Creator: Gruber, W. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactivity and efficiency trends vs. operating trends for C, H, KE, and KW reactors - 1956 through 1960

Description: Changes in operation and corresponding changes in the reactivity status of Hanford reactors are the result of a continuing effort to improve operating efficiency. Trends data related to these changes in operation and reactivity have been published previously for the periods from 1950 through 1959. The purpose of this report is to include trends data for 1960. All included data were selected from the sources listed. Bar graphs in the first part of the report show yearly averages of selected data, and the line graphs in the second part show the interrelationship of some of the yearly averages depicted in the first part. The tables in Appendix I show maximum, average, and minimum values. This document presents trends data for C, H, KE, and KW reactors. A second document, HW-72855, presents trends data for B, D, DR, and F reactors.
Date: March 1, 1962
Creator: Perl, E. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department