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REACTOR PRODUCING 3000 F STEAM FOR PROCESS HEAT

Description: A conceptual design is presented for a reactor producing 3000 deg F, 400 psi steam to supply process heat for high temperature endothermic chemical reactions. Specifically, the supplying of heat to a coal hydrogenation plant is studied but other applications are possible. Such a market for nuclear heat is economically interesting because the competition is with the relatively expensive oxygen combustion of coal. It was assumed that in the present state of the art a ceramic heat source could not contain nuclear fuel in an open cycle due to the hazard of fission product leakage into the process stream. This assumption limited the high temperature heat source to the order of 10% of the total reactor power. The particular design studied was found to be not economically feasible due 10 the unusually large inventory of enriched uranium required. However, it is felt that with the suggested changes, nuclear process heat from this type of reactor oould be competitive if the excess power produced could be sold economically. (auth)
Date: August 1, 1956
Creator: Roberts, J.T.; Lagarias, J.S.; Remick, F.J.; Ritzmann, R.W.f Roberts, J.O.; Roberts, W.J.; Schmidt, J.E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT. PART I. STUDY PROGRAM ON HIGH SPEED COMPUTER. PART II. MATHEMATICAL RESEARCH AND PROGRAMMING. PART III. MATHEMATICAL ANALYTICAL PROGRAM. PART IV. ILLIAC USE AND OPERATION--GENERAL LABORATORY INFORMATION

Description: Work on a study program on high-speed computers is reported. Computer programming is discussed. ILLIAC use and operation are summarized. (For preceding period see AECU-3373.) (W.D.M.)
Date: September 1, 1956
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Danger Coefficient Measurements Using a Water Boiler Reactor

Description: The use of a water boiler reactor as a danger coefficient test instrument has been investigated, with emphasis on the testing of reactor materials for neutron absorbing impurities and the testing of uranium for enrichment variations. After calibration of the WBNS course control rod, tests were made on a variety of materials including beryllium, boron trifluoride, iron and steel, natural uranium metal and oxide, and uranium metal of various enrichments. Several experiments were conducted to evaluate the sources and magnitudes of errors in danger coefficient testing. On the basis of the data obtained from sample testing and auxiliary experiments, the sensitivity of the WBNS for absorption and enrichment testing was determined, as well as other constants relating to danger coefficient measurements. The Water Boiler Neutron Source has been found to be well suited to danger coefficient testing. Small absorption differences between samples of similar geometry and nuclear propenties can be determined to a standard deviation of 0.002 cm/sup 2/. The danger coefflcient technique using the WBNS compares favorably with other methods of absorption detecting methods, such as the shotgun test or chemical analysis. Enrichment differences between natural uranium samples of only 500 grams can be detected to plus or minus .0008 per cent U/sup 235/ by weight, and between 3 per cent enriched samples to plus or minus 0.0028 per cent U/sup 235/. In enrichment testing relative values can be found to an accuracy equivalent to those obtained from spectrographic analyses. With improvements in the WBNS core arrangement so that larger samples could be handled, and relocation of the glory hole to the flux center of the core, greater sensitivity could be obtained. The WBNS compares favorably to other reactors used for danger coefficient work (auth)
Date: March 1, 1956
Creator: Engholm, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A PILOT PLANT FOR THE REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE TO URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE

Description: Pilot plant experiments are described in which trichloroethylene was used for the reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride. After unsatisfactory preliminary results with liquid phase reduction, satisfactory results were obtained with a vapor phase reduction system. It was found that vapor phase reduction at approximately 450 deg F, produced a low density product which contained only small quantities of uranium(VI); sintering the uranium tetrafluoride in a hydrogen fluoride atmosphere increased the product density to approximately 3 g/cc. The reduction was essentially complete, and the effluent gas contained less than 1 ppm of uranium hexafluoride. The purity of the uranium tetrafluoride produced was equivalent to that of the uranium hexafluoride used as feed. A complete discussion is given of the operation of the various parts of the system. (auth)
Date: May 31, 1956
Creator: Baker, J.E.; Klaus, H.V.; Schmidt, R.A. & Smiley, S.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department