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Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program facilities newsletter, May 2002.

Description: Eight eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement systems are now deployed throughout the ARM SGP CART site. These systems are used to determine the flux (flow) of sensible heat, the flux of latent heat, and air momentum just above cropland a few hundred feet upwind of the ECOR locations. Sensible heat is energy we feel as warmth. Latent heat is the energy that evaporated water vapor measured in the atmosphere. The ECOR systems actually measure wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, water vapor, and barometric pressure. The surface flux values for sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum are calculated from these measurements.
Date: June 3, 2002
Creator: Holdridge, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, May 2000.

Description: This month the authors will visit an ARM CART site with a pleasant climate: the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) CART site, along the equator in the western Pacific Ocean. The TWP locale lies between 10 degrees North latitude and 10 degrees South latitude and extends from Indonesia east-ward beyond the international date line. This area was selected because it is in and around the Pacific warm pool, the area of warm sea-surface temperatures that determine El Nino/La Nina episodes. The warm pool also adds heat and moisture to the atmosphere and thus fuels cloud formation. Understanding the way tropical clouds and water vapor affect the solar radiation budget is a focus of the ARM Program. The two current island-based CART sites in the TWP are in Manus Province in Papua New Guinea and on Nauru Island.
Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Sisterson, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, May 2001.

Description: To help communities guard against the devastation that can result from severe weather, the National Weather Service (NWS) has developed a new program called StormReady. The aim is to build, at the community level, the communication and safety skills necessary to prevent loss of life and property in the event of severe weather. Each year weather-related disasters lead to 500 deaths and $14 billion in damage. The NWS hopes that prepared communities implementing StormReady can reduce these numbers when local emergency managers have clear-cut guidelines for improving their hazardous weather operations.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: Holdridge, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department