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ELECTROSTATIC MODELING OF THE JEFFERSON LABORATORY INVERTED CERAMIC GUN

Description: Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently developing a new 500kV DC electron gun for future use with the FEL. The design consists of two inverted ceramics which support a central cathode electrode. This layout allows for a load-lock system to be located behind the gun chamber. The electrostatic geometry of the gun has been designed to minimize surface electric field gradients and also to provide some transverse focusing to the electron beam during transit between the cathode and anode. This paper discusses the electrode design philosophy and presents the results of electrostatic simulations. The electric field information obtained through modeling was used with particle tracking codes to predict the effects on the electron beam.
Date: May 1, 2010
Creator: P. Evtushenko ,F.E. Hannon, C. Hernandez-Garcia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CONTROL OF NONLINEAR DYNAMICS BY ACTIVE AND PASSIVE METHODS FOR THE NSLS-II INSERTION DEVICES

Description: Nonlinear effects from insertion devices are potentially a limiting factor for the electron beam quality of modern ring-based light sources, i.e., the on and off-dynamical aperture, leading to reduced injection efficiency and beam lifetime. These effects can be modelled by e.g. kick maps ({approx}1/{gamma}{sup 2}) and controlled by e.g. first-order thin or thick magnetic kicks introduced by 'magic fingers,' 'L-shims,' or 'current strips'. However, due to physical or technological constraints, these corrections are typically only partial. Therefore, a precise model is needed to correctly minimize the residual nonlinear effects for the entire system. We outline a systematic method for integrated design and rapid prototyping based on evaluation of the 3D magnetic field and control of the local trajectory with RADIA, and particle tracking with Tracy-3 for validation. The optimal geometry for the compensating magnetic fields is determined from the results of these simulations using a combination of linear algebra and genetic optimization.
Date: May 20, 2012
Creator: J., Bengtsson; Chubar, O.; Kitegi, C. & Tanabe, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plasma Treatment of Niobium SRF Cavity Surfaces

Description: Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate non- superconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region of the SRF cavity surface and to remove mechanically damaged surface layer improving surface roughness. We have demonstrated on flat samples that plasma etching in Ar / Cl2 of bulk Nb is a viable alternative surface preparation technique to BCP and EP methods, with comparable etching rates. The geometry of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb defines the use of asymmetric RF discharge configuration for plasma etching. In a specially designed single cell cavity with sample holders, discharge parameters are combined with etched surface diagnostics to obtain optimum combination of etching rates, roughness and homogeneity in a variety of discharge types, conditions, and sequences. The optimized experimental conditions will ultimately be applied to single cell SRF cavities.
Date: May 1, 2010
Creator: J. Upadhyay, M. Raskovic, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A.-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Benchmark of Different Electromagnetic Codes for the High Frequency Calculation

Description: In this paper, we present benchmarking results for highclass 3D electromagnetic (EM) codes in designing RF cavities today. These codes include Omega3P [1], VORPAL [2], CST Microwave Studio [3], Ansoft HFSS [4], and ANSYS [5]. Two spherical cavities are selected as the benchmark models. We have compared not only the accuracy of resonant frequencies, but also that of surface EM fields, which are critical for superconducting RF cavities. By removing degenerated modes, we calculate all the resonant modes up to 10 GHz with similar mesh densities, so that the geometry approximation and field interpolation error related to the wavelength can be observed.
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang, Frank Marhauser, Guangfeng Cheng, Chuandong Zhou
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

Description: Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.
Date: May 29, 2007
Creator: Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald & Simon, Joan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-photon Photoemission of Organic Semiconductor Molecules on Ag(111)

Description: Angle- and time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) was used to study systems of organic semiconductors on Ag(111). The 2PPE studies focused on electronic behavior specific to interfaces and ultrathin films. Electron time dynamics and band dispersions were characterized for ultrathin films of a prototypical n-type planar aromatic hydrocarbon, PTCDA, and representatives from a family of p-type oligothiophenes.In PTCDA, electronic behavior was correlated with film morphology and growth modes. Within a fewmonolayers of the interface, image potential states and a LUMO+1 state were detected. The degree to which the LUMO+1 state exhibited a band mass less than a free electron mass depended on the crystallinity of the layer. Similarly, image potential states were measured to have free electron-like effective masses on ordered surfaces, and the effective masses increased with disorder within the thin film. Electron lifetimes were correlated with film growth modes, such that the lifetimes of electrons excited into systems created by layer-by-layer, amorphous film growth increased by orders of magnitude by only a few monolayers from the surface. Conversely, the decay dynamics of electrons in Stranski-Krastanov systems were limited by interaction with the exposed wetting layer, which limited the barrier to decay back into the metal.Oligothiophenes including monothiophene, quaterthiophene, and sexithiophene were deposited on Ag(111), and their electronic energy levels and effective masses were studied as a function of oligothiophene length. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO decreased with increasing chain length, but effective mass was found to depend on domains from high- or low-temperature growth conditions rather than chain length. In addition, the geometry of the molecule on the surface, e.g., tilted or planar, substantially affected the electronic structure.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Yang, Aram & Yang, Aram
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Probing the Geometry of Warped String Compactifications at the LHC

Description: Warped string compactifications, characterized by the nonsingular behavior of the metric in the infrared (IR), feature departures from the usual anti?de Sitter warped extra dimensions. We study the implications of the smooth IR cutoff for Randall-Sundrum- (RS-)type models. We find that the phenomenology of the Kaluza-Klein gravitons (including their masses and couplings) depends sensitively on the precise shape of the warp factor in the IR. In particular, we analyze the warped deformed conifold, find that the spectrum differs significantly from that of RS, and present a simple prescription (a mass-gap ansatz) that can be used to study the phenomenology of IR modifications to 5D warped extra dimensions.
Date: May 28, 2007
Creator: Walker, Devin; Shiu, Gary; Underwood, Bret; Zurek, Kathryn M. & Walker, Devin G. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Where Water is Oxidized to Dioxygen: Structure of thePhotosynthetic Mn4Ca Cluster

Description: Oxidation of water to dioxygen is catalyzed withinphotosystem II (PSII) by a Mn4Ca cluster, the structure of which remainselusive. Polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)measurements on PSII single crystals constrain the Mn4Ca cluster geometryto a set of three similar high-resolution structures. Combining polarizedEXAFS and X-ray diffraction data, the cluster was placed within PSIItaking into account the overall trend of the electron density of themetal site and the putative ligands. The structure of the cluster fromthe present study is unlike either the 3.0 or 3.5 Angstrom resolutionX-ray structures, and other previously proposed models.
Date: May 31, 2006
Creator: Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Sauer, Kenneth; Latimer, Matthew J.; Pushkar, Yulia; Biesiadka, Jacek et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental evidence of a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect in C-60(+)

Description: Detailed analysis of the HOMO bandshape in the photoelectron spectrum of gaseous C60 reveals a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60+. The direct observation of three tunneling states asserts a D3d geometry for the isolated cation, originating from a strong vibronic coupling. These results show that the ionic motion of the ions plays an important role in the electron-phonon interaction.
Date: May 20, 2002
Creator: Canton, S.E.; Yencha, A.J.; Kukk, E.; Bozek, J.D.; Lopes, M.C.A.; Snell, G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

Description: Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction ...
Date: May 24, 2007
Creator: Li, L.; Steefel, C.I. & Yang, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mapping the geometry of the F4 group

Description: In this paper, we present a construction of the compact form of the exceptional Lie group F4 by exponentiating the corresponding Lie algebra f4. We realize F4 as the automorphisms group of the exceptional Jordan algebra, whose elements are 3 x 3 Hermitian matrices with octonionic entries. We use a parametrization which generalizes the Euler angles for SU(2) and is based on the fibration of F4 via a Spin(9) subgroup as a fiber. This technique allows us to determine an explicit expression for the Haar invariant measure on the F4 group manifold. Apart from shedding light on the structure of F4 and its coset manifold OP2 = F4/Spin(9), the octonionic projective plane, these results are a prerequisite for the study of E6, of which F4 is a (maximal) subgroup.
Date: May 28, 2007
Creator: Bernardoni, Fabio; Cacciatori, Sergio L; Scotti, Antonio & Cerchiai, Bianca L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR THREE VISUAL EXAMINATION AND TRU REMEDIATION GLOVEBOX FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Description: Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums at three separate facilities at the Savannah River Site. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements using cooled HPGe spectrometers are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. {sup 239}Pu is the main nuclide of interest; however, {sup 241}Pu, equilibrium {sup 237}Np/{sup 233}Pa and {sup 238}Pu (if detected) are typically assayed. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) facility {sup 243,244,245}Cm are also generally observed and are always reported at either finite levels or at limits of detection. A complete assay at each of the three facilities includes a measure of TRU content in the gloveboxes and HEPA filters in the glovebox exhaust. This paper includes a description of the {gamma}-PHA acquisitions, of the modeling, and of the calculations of nuclide content. Because each of the remediation facilities is unique and ergonomically unfavorable to {gamma}-ray acquisitions, we have constructed custom detector support devices specific to each set of acquisitions. This paper includes a description and photographs of these custom devices. The description of modeling and calculations include determination and application of container and matrix photon energy dependent absorption factors and also determination and application of geometry factors relative to our detector calibration geometry. The paper also includes a discussion of our measurements accuracy using off-line assays of two SRNL HEPA filters. The comparison includes assay of the filters inside of 55-gallon drums using the SRNL Q{sup 2} assay system and separately using off-line assay with an ...
Date: May 4, 2007
Creator: Dewberry, R & Donald Pak, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR VISUAL EXAMINATION GLOVEBOXES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Description: Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. High Cs-137 backgrounds in the VE glovebox areas preclude the use of a sodium iodide spectrometer, so a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, having superior resolution, is used. Plutonium-239 is usually the nuclide of interest; however, Pu-241, Np-237 (including its daughter Pa-233) and Pu-238 (if detected) are typically assayed. Cs-137 and Co-60 may also be detected but are not reported since they do not contribute to the Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent or Pu-239 Equivalent Curies. HEPA filters, drums and waste boxes are also assayed by the same methodology. If--for example--the HEPA is contained in a stainless steel housing, attenuation corrections must be applied for both the filter and the housing. Dimensions, detector locations, materials and densities are provided as inputs to Ortec's ISOTOPIC software to estimate attenuation and geometry corrections for the measurement positions. This paper discusses the methodology, results and limitations of these measurements for different VE glovebox configurations.
Date: May 3, 2006
Creator: Sigg, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of Higher Order Mode Dampers in the 56MHz SRF Cavity for RHIC

Description: A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed for a luminosity upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), including requirements for Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping. In this paper, we describe our optimization of the damper's performance, and modifications made to its original design. We also show the effects of the damper geometry on the cavity's HOM impedance. To reduce the likelihood of magnetic breakdown, we lowered the magnetic field enhancement at the ports to a value less than the highest field in the cavity. We simulated all monopole and dipole HOMs up to 1GHz with their frequencies, mode configurations, R/Qs, and shunt impedances, verifying that all modes are well-damped with the optimized design and configuration. The 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity is a quarterwave resonator designed to have a gap voltage of 2.5 MV. Our plans are to place this beam-driven resonator at a common section of RHIC to provide a storage RF potential for both rings. The large bucket of the cavity will reduce spill due to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS), and thus increase the luminosity for the detectors. It is very important to damp all the cavity's Higher Order Modes (HOMs) to avoid beam instabilities. The design chosen for the HOM damper is a magnetically coupled loop located at the rear end of the cavity. The loop and its port geometry must be optimized to assure sufficient damping, avoid a large enhancement of the local magnetic field. A high-pass filter is included in the circuit to reduce the power extraction from the fundamental mode. The number of HOM dampers used and their configuration also are important factors for the damping and cooling system. A small loop area will couple out less power from the cavity's fundamental mode, thus reducing the voltage and power dissipation in the damper's ...
Date: May 23, 2010
Creator: Wu, Q. & Ben-Zvi, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A GUINIER CAMERA FOR SR POWDER DIFFRACTION: HIGH RESOLUTION AND HIGH THROUGHPUT.

Description: The paper describe a new powder diffraction instrument for synchrotron radiation sources which combines the high throughput of a position-sensitive detector system with the high resolution normally only provided by a crystal analyzer. It uses the Guinier geometry which is traditionally used with an x-ray tube source. This geometry adapts well to the synchrotron source, provided proper beam conditioning is applied. The high brightness of the SR source allows a high resolution to be achieved. When combined with a photon-counting silicon microstrip detector array, the system becomes a powerful instrument for radiation-sensitive samples or time-dependent phase transition studies.
Date: May 28, 2006
Creator: SIDDONS,D.P.; HULBERT, S.L. & STEPHENS, P.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational fluid dynamics analyses of lateral heat conduction, coolant azimuthal mixing and heat transfer predictions in a BR2 fuel assembly geometry.

Description: To support the analyses related to the conversion of the BR2 core from highly-enriched (HEU) to low-enriched (LEU) fuel, the thermal-hydraulics codes PLTEMP and RELAP-3D are used to evaluate the safety margins during steady-state operation (PLTEMP), as well as after a loss-of-flow, loss-of-pressure, or a loss of coolant event (RELAP). In the 1-D PLTEMP and RELAP simulations, conduction in the azimuthal and axial directions is not accounted. The very good thermal conductivity of the cladding and the fuel meat and significant temperature gradients in the lateral directions (axial and azimuthal directions) could lead to a heat flux distribution that is significantly different than the power distribution. To evaluate the significance of the lateral heat conduction, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, using the CFD code STAR-CD, were performed. Safety margin calculations are typically performed for a hot stripe, i.e., an azimuthal region of the fuel plates/coolant channel containing the power peak. In a RELAP model, for example, a channel between two plates could be divided into a number of RELAP channels (stripes) in the azimuthal direction. In a PLTEMP model, the effect of azimuthal power peaking could be taken into account by using engineering factors. However, if the thermal mixing in the azimuthal direction of a coolant channel is significant, a stripping approach could be overly conservative by not taking into account this mixing. STAR-CD simulations were also performed to study the thermal mixing in the coolant. Section II of this document presents the results of the analyses of the lateral heat conduction and azimuthal thermal mixing in a coolant channel. Finally, PLTEMP and RELAP simulations rely on the use of correlations to determine heat transfer coefficients. Previous analyses showed that the Dittus-Boelter correlation gives significantly more conservative (lower) predictions than the correlations of Sieder-Tate and Petukhov. STAR-CD 3-D simulations ...
Date: May 23, 2011
Creator: Tzanos, C. P. & Dionne, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARISON OF THE ACCURACY OF VARIOUS SPATIAL DISCRETIZATION SCHEMES OF THE DISCRETE ORDINATES EQUATIONS IN 2D CARTESIAN GEOMETRY

Description: We present a comprehensive error estimation of four spatial discretization schemes of the two-dimensional Discrete Ordinates (SN) equations on Cartesian grids utilizing a Method of Manufactured Solution (MMS) benchmark suite based on variants of Larsen’s benchmark featuring different orders of smoothness of the underlying exact solution. The considered spatial discretization schemes include the arbitrarily high order transport methods of the nodal (AHOTN) and characteristic (AHOTC) types, the discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DGFEM) and the recently proposed higher order diamond difference method (HODD) of spatial expansion orders 0 through 3. While AHOTN and AHOTC rely on approximate analytical solutions of the transport equation within a mesh cell, DGFEM and HODD utilize a polynomial expansion to mimick the angular flux profile across each mesh cell. Intuitively, due to the higher degree of analyticity, we expect AHOTN and AHOTC to feature superior accuracy compared with DGFEM and HODD, but at the price of potentially longer grind times and numerical instabilities. The latter disadvantages can result from the presence of exponential terms evaluated at the cell optical thickness that arise from the semianalytical solution process. This work quantifies the order of accuracy and the magnitude of the error of all four discretization methods for different optical thicknesses, scattering ratios and degrees of smoothness of the underlying exact solutions in order to verify or contradict the aforementioned intuitive expectation.
Date: May 1, 2011
Creator: Schunert, Sebastian; Azmy, Yousry Y. & Fournier, Damien
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF HD2, A HIgh Nb3Sn DIPOLE MAGNET

Description: The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has designed and tested HD2, a 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator-type dipole based on a simple block-type coil geometry with flared ends. HD2 represents a step toward the development of cost-effective accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The design was optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and to address iron saturation and conductor magnetization effects. Field quality was measured during recent cold tests. The measured harmonics are presented and compared to the design values.
Date: May 4, 2009
Creator: Wang, X.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R. R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Coaxial Static-Electromagnetic Velocity Spectrometer for HighEnergy Particles

Description: An apparatus is described in which crossed E and H fields will be used to separate high-energy charged particles of different masses. It is shown that use of coaxial geometry is expected to effect satisfactory separation within a considerably shorter system than would be possible in a parallel-plate system with a comparable separation criterion, A summary is given of the operational characteristics of a spectrometer now under construction.
Date: May 7, 1957
Creator: Murray, Joseph J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications

Description: Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) present higher efficiency, larger production rate, and can be operated in deeper wells than the other geothermal artificial lifting systems. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300 C geothermal water at 80kg/s flow rate in a maximum 10-5/8-inch diameter wellbore to improve the cost-effectiveness. In this paper, an advanced ESP design tool comprising a 1D theoretical model and a 3D CFD analysis has been developed to design ESPs for geothermal applications. Design of Experiments was also performed to optimize the geometry and performance. The designed mixed-flow type centrifugal impeller and diffuser exhibit high efficiency and head rise under simulated EGS conditions. The design tool has been validated by comparing the prediction to experimental data of an existing ESP product.
Date: May 31, 2012
Creator: Qi, Xuele; Turnquist, Norman & Ghasripoor, Farshad
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 2: Multi-Surface Contact

Description: A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems use multiple interfaces and a combination of enforcement methods to assess the basic functionality of the contact algorithms. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions during contact. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where multiple bodies interact with each other via multiple interfaces. The test problems focus on whether any ordering issues exist in the contact logic by using a combination of interface types, contact enforcement options (i.e., penalty, Lagrange, and kinematic), and element interactions within each problem. The influence of rigid materials on interface behavior is also examined. The companion report (McMichael, 2006) and associated test problems address the basic contact scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. The test problems are analyzed using version 5.2 (compiled on 12/22/2005) of DYNA3D. The analytical results are used to form baseline solutions for subsequent regression testing. In section 2, the test problems are presented, and the static solution is developed ...
Date: May 10, 2006
Creator: McMichael, L D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contact Interface Verification for DYNA3D Scenario 1: Basic Contact

Description: A suite of test problems has been developed to examine contact behavior within the nonlinear, three-dimensional, explicit finite element analysis (FEA) code DYNA3D (Lin, 2005). The test problems address the basic functionality of the contact algorithms, including the behavior of various kinematic, penalty, and Lagrangian enforcement formulations. The results from the DYNA3D analyses are compared to closed form solutions to verify the contact behavior. This work was performed as part of the Verification and Validation efforts of LLNL W Program within the NNSA's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program. DYNA3D models the transient dynamic response of solids and structures including the interactions between disjoint bodies (parts). A wide variety of contact surfaces are available to represent the diverse interactions possible during an analysis, including relative motion (sliding), separation and gap closure (voids), and fixed relative position (tied). The problem geometry may be defined using a combination of element formulations, including one-dimensional beam and truss elements, two-dimensional shell elements, and three-dimensional solid elements. Consequently, it is necessary to consider various element interactions for each contact algorithm being verified. Most of the contact algorithms currently available in DYNA3D are examined; the exceptions are the Type 4--Single Surface Contact and Type 11--SAND algorithms. It is likely that these algorithms will be removed since their functionality is embodied in other, more robust, contact algorithms. The automatic contact algorithm is evaluated using the Type 12 interface. Two other variations of automatic contact, Type 13 and Type 14, offer additional means to adapt the interface domain, but share the same search and restoration algorithms as Type 12. The contact algorithms are summarized in Table 1. This report and associated test problems examine the scenario where one contact surface exists between two disjoint bodies. These test problems focus on whether a particular contact algorithm properly represents the ...
Date: May 10, 2006
Creator: McMichael, L D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preconditioner and convergence study for the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) nonlinear poisson problem posed on the Ottawa Flat 270 design geometry.

Description: A numerical study aimed to evaluate different preconditioners within the Trilinos Ifpack and ML packages for the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) non-linear Poisson problem implemented within the Albany code base and posed on the Ottawa Flat 270 design geometry is performed. This study led to some new development of Albany that allows the user to select an ML preconditioner with Zoltan repartitioning based on nodal coordinates, which is summarized. Convergence of the numerical solutions computed within the QCAD computational suite with successive mesh refinement is examined in two metrics, the mean value of the solution (an L{sup 1} norm) and the field integral of the solution (L{sup 2} norm).
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Kalashnikova, Irina
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department